Audio Audio/Peripherals Basics Gaming Headphones Headsets Practice Reviews Sound Systems Soundcards

Onboard sound disadvantages, problems, workarounds, external and internal solutions, headphone guide and basics

Headphone sensitivity, amplifier power and amplification (gain)

I’ll now generously declare the fed signals to be the ideal case and deliberately leave things like the graphics card under full load out of it. We just had that. Let’s take a look at what comes out of a normal, average motherboard and why different headphones can reach different volume levels. This is exactly where a very important manufacturer’s specification comes into focus, which our dear horn manufacturers like to keep quiet about. One thing I’ll say first: the right impedance does not necessarily mean that the headphones (or the headset) will automatically play well and loud enough! And V is not equal to Vrms. But more on that in a moment.

The most important factor for the harmony between amplifier and headphones is its so-called sensitivity. This provides information about the minimum output power that an amplifier must deliver at the impedance of the headphones in question in order for them to reach a certain volume level.

 

A suitable headphone amplifier therefore offers enough maximum power at the output, as well as enough gain to reach the desired power level with a certain source at all, because the sources also vary greatly in their level, regardless of whether in-game sound or external feeds (CD, BR) are listened to. To make a long story short: a quiet source must be able to be amplified well enough for the headphone amplifier (onboard or external) to reach full output at all. However, this full scale level must then also be sufficiently high to get headphones of any impedance to a desired volume level. Otherwise, it will either remain quiet, or it will already distort because the amplifier has to overdrive to make it loud at all.

I don’t presume to provide exact measurements of the distortion factor for the motherboard at this point, but I also want to make it clear and prove with measurements how beautiful and how often marketing bubbles can miss the mark. If the appropriate output power is missing, even the best Japanese gold capacitors are of no use. And this is exactly what we are talking about now!

What do Vrms mean and how do you calculate the correct output power?

Power is the product of voltage and current. But since I only measure voltages here and no currents, the formula can (and must) be rearranged quite easily, because I deliberately work with (stable) ohmic load resistances that I know. And don’t worry that it’s going to be complicated now, because it’s really simple! Let’s just look at the motherboard measurement, where I determined the maximum distortion-free output voltage Vrms of this model at 1 KHz and 32 ohms:

 

While the upper graph shows several waves of the 1 kHz sine wave, I have zoomed out a single wave for the lower graph, also to show that the curve is still displayed reasonably cleanly even at the peak. So nothing distorts here yet and I can use the determined value for Vrms with a clear conscience. We can also see very nicely in the picture that the maximum voltage is actually 0.694 volts, while the Vrms value is only 0.48 volts. This is also referred to as the RMS value (root mean square) or Veff.

However, since the effective voltage Vrms has been used for years (root mean square) and I want to remain comparable, I have permanently installed this calculation and from now on only refer to this effective value. So the mainboard delivers a maximum of 0.4805 Vrms at 32 ohms. But what does this mean for the output power? If you now remember the famous URI triangle of Ohm’s law, you can rearrange the formula very easily. Of course, these are actually impedances, where the resistance value (induction!) also changes depending on the frequency, but at 1 KHz this can be neglected.

Now just multiply Vrms (U) by itself and then divide this by the resistance (R) to get the power (P = U x I). So I calculate (0.4805 Vrms)² / 32 ohms = 7.2162 mW RMS. At 1 KHz at 32 ohms, the amplifier thus produces an ample 7.2 mW RMS, which is again quite ridiculous. Especially since the pure sine power with (0.694 V)² / 32 ohms = 15.05 mW sine per channel may look like more at first glance, but in the end it loses significance with complex sounds.

Now we at least also know why the wattage specifications in RMS are used on the speakers and amplifiers. About 20 years ago and earlier, output power was specified in watts of continuous sine wave power at 1 KHz. But since almost everyone has now bowed to the dictates with the RMS and thus the chaos is perfect for the layman, I also stick to the Vrms and Watt RMS, even if it looks a bit more complicated. But what actually happens with high impedance transducers with e.g. 600 Ohm impedance? Again, this is easy to calculate, because for Vrms I measure without distortion up to 1.3649 Vrms. So the maximum output power at 1 KHz into 600 ohms is (1.3649 Vrms)² / 600 ohms = 3.105 mW RMS! That’s even less than half of what I could measure at 32 ohms!

Since the manufacturers often only specify the power in watts and deliberately omit the abbreviation RMS, I will also do this in the following text so that the quoted manufacturer specifications and the curves do not confuse us. However, this does not make it any more correct.

Good amplifiers therefore have a so-called “gain” switch, which ensures that the voltage at the output is increased by a resulting higher amplification factor. This is automatically accompanied by an increased output power, which is needed for higher volume levels. However, the gain switch is primarily intended for a voltage increase in order to still achieve the maximum output power at higher impedances.

 

Output power and sound level

With output powers of less than 10 mW, the desired volume level is rarely reached, and those who want to use high-impedance headphones are downright punished with the onboard sound. This sounds thin and false and also distorts at the slightest sneeze! If you buy headphones, the so-called sensitivity is therefore a very important indicator of how loud it can be operated at all in the end, i.e. what sound pressure level (SPL) it can still cleanly achieve at what amplifier power.

The only thing is that a certain sound pressure is not always generated in the same way. A lot depends on the material being played, so if you’re aiming for an average, well-tolerated level (SPL) of, say, 85 dB (safe for children and not damaging in the long run), you should add another 25 to 30 dB for the peaks of, say, classical music and its high dynamic range (Wide Dynamic Range). This also applies to good games with 12 to 18 dB. Pop music, on the other hand, is usually “only” 8 to 12 dB markup as a rule of thumb. Stupidly, manufacturers specify either milliwatts (mW) or required rms voltage (Vrms) for a given SPL value. Or nothing at all. And now we also know why I had to reckon with you in the previous section, because now you can care about the different specifications, as long as something was specified at all! We can now convert it ourselves.

My Beyerdynamic Amiron Home, for example, is rated at 102 dB / 1 mW, which would theoretically even come close with the 3.1 mW of the motherboard at 600 ohms, because the impedance of the headphones is 250 ohms, which is still significantly lower. But – and here comes the nasty but: we also need the peak SPL for a good dynamic reproduction without distortions! For example, to achieve 115 dB (85 dB average + 30 dB peak boost), I would need almost 20 mW, which the onboard sound can’t deliver at all.

Depending on the quality of the headphones and the resulting sensitivity, up to 1 watt of output power at the required impedance would be required for the 115 dB SPL as the assumed peak value! Onboard sound (with a few exceptions) can never deliver something like this! And now we also know why the dynamics on the motherboard don’t work and why some things just sound horrible, even have to sound horrible. The better (and more sensitive) the headphones, the better it still harmonizes with the motherboards. But good is almost always not, just less bad.

For the lazy ones I have prepared something… The first table shows us rather poor headphones with a sensitivity of 85 dB/mW up to 94 dB/mW and what amplifier power must be applied to achieve between 90 and 115 dB maximum sound pressure level. Whether the parts can withstand and survive this at all is, of course, another matter.

Here I would still have the slightly better headphones, where it is limited with the output power.

 

Interim summary

This should also make the purpose of a good headphone amplifier clear: it always provides a sufficiently high output power or Vrms to be able to play back pieces with a high dynamic range without distortion and limitation. Sound at children’s room volume or not, this is about pushing the technology to the limit. This is exactly why the approach of some blind tests to use the highest possible quality and most expensive headphones for such tests on the motherboard is completely misleading.

Because these very high-priced specimens are extremely sensitive and require much lower output power than the usual suspects with under 100 dB / mW. What is just fine with the noble headphones on the motherboard, as long as you listen to music in idle, is a big mess with the normal headphones. And usually these are not even to blame for the dilemma! That’s why I always measure headphones on a high-quality end device to rule out exactly this problem from the start.

The more insensitive the headphones are, the better the headphone amplifier must deliver! And this is exactly where the inexpensive onboard solutions almost always reach their limits. By the way, this also affects many headphones with a built-in USB sound card, because the provider does not consider what his headphones really need. But that would really be the point where the industry would play along again and offer things that you can use with a clear conscience. But we will come to that in a moment

That’s why I think the usual tests of motherboards with a few OC benchmarks are a bit incomplete and I can only advise the colleagues to also measure the output power and Vrms. Because exactly this information is essential and yet never found in the motherboards’ data sheets. 

173 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

DrWandel

Mitglied

83 Kommentare 68 Likes

Danke für die ausführlichen Informationen!

Ich muss jedoch sagen, dass für meine Zwecke (vor allem Spielen und Hintergrundmusik) der Realtek ALC892 auf meinem X370-Board (MSI) völlig ausreicht. Brummen, Zirpen und ähnliche Effekte habe ich kaum wahrnehmbar. Sicher, das ist bestimmt keine HiFi, aber für mich gut genug. Vielleicht habe ich auch einfach nur Glück, aber auch über Kopfhörer ist der Sound recht ordentlich, obwohl ich meistens lieber meine uralten (ca. 30 Jahre) Sony-Aktivboxen verwende.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,293 Kommentare 19,077 Likes

Kaum ist nicht nicht ;)

Je potenter die Grafikkarte, umso mehr Grillen muss man zertreten :D

Antwort 1 Like

ipat66

Urgestein

1,368 Kommentare 1,366 Likes

Es lässt sich erahnen,warum wir länger auf diesen Artikel warten mussten.
Sehr informativ.
Da hat man noch für später was zu lesen !

Freue mich schon auf Teil 2...:)
Danke Igor

Antwort Gefällt mir

ssj3rd

Veteran

219 Kommentare 155 Likes

Hatte auch extreme Störgeräusche mit meiner On-Board Karte aber auch mit meiner intern verbauten Soundblaster AE9. Lustigerweise aber immer erst dann, sobald ich ein Spiel gestartet habe.
Nach vielen vielen testen und Herumprobieren mit (teils sehr teuren) abgeschirmten Cinch+Strom Kabeln hat schlussendlich ein kleines 10€ Wunder-Kästchen Ruhe im Karton verschafft: (der ja auch im Artikel erwähnt wird)
https://www.amazon.de/dp/B076JGVJGP...t_i_MBY9S0CEJQR0XDFXMYNC?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1
Da ich halt 5.1 habe musste ich natürlich 3 Stück davon abbringen, aber seitdem ist absolut Ruhe im Karton.
Da ich auch öfters beim Autoradio mal ein knistern hatte habe ich es auch dort angebracht, auch dort kein knistern mehr, nix.

Ist für mich echt ein kleines Zauber Kästchen 🙏

PS:
Übrigens hat bei mir eine externe Soundkarte über USB die exakt gleichen Störgeräusche auf den Boxen verursacht wie die interne. In die gleiche Steckdose stecken hat auch nicht geholfen, was genau ist den eine symmetrische Verkabelung von der hier im Artikel gesprochen wird?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Igor Wallossek

1

10,293 Kommentare 19,077 Likes

Dafür gibts ja den Goldfisch aus dem Oehlbach, der schnappt dann beim USB nach Luft :p

BTW: den Feintech habe ich ja im Artikel :D

View image at the forums

Antwort Gefällt mir

ssj3rd

Veteran

219 Kommentare 155 Likes

Damit ist was genau gemeint?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,293 Kommentare 19,077 Likes

Ertappt! Du hast den Artikel nicht gelesen :p

Seite 3:

Dein Feintech steht übrigens auf Seite 2 ;)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Ghoster52

Urgestein

1,430 Kommentare 1,095 Likes

Vielen Dank Igor! (y)
Zur AE-5 sei noch gesagt, den Stromanschluss benötigt man nur für den ARGB (scheiß) Streifen.
So ist es jedenfalls bei der NonPlus.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,293 Kommentare 19,077 Likes

Ich habe hier die AE-9 auch gerade ohne PCIe am Laufen ;)
Allerdings braucht der externe Kasten leider den 6-Pin

Antwort Gefällt mir

S
SpiritWolf448

Veteran

122 Kommentare 35 Likes

Schöner Artikel, Igor, der wie üblich Lust auf mehr macht. :)

Ich hier habe eine externe SoundBlasterX G6 in Gebrauch, gekoppelt an einen SwissSonic HAD-1 Kopfhörer-DAC von Thomann (via TOSLink). Damit befeuere ich meine Beyerdynamic DT990 (250 Ohm Variante). Ich bin kein Audiophiler, von daher kann ich sagen, das ich mit der Kombo sehr zufrieden bin. (Unter Windows. Linux benutze ich nicht, daher kann ich dazu nichts sagen.)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,293 Kommentare 19,077 Likes

Die G6 ist drin so ähnlich wie die X4 ;)

Antwort 1 Like

c
cunhell

Urgestein

556 Kommentare 523 Likes

Ich habe noch zwei SB X-Fi Titanium PCIe. eine davon an einer analogen 5.1 Anlage. Klingt einfach gut. Zumindest beim Zocken und für meine Ohren ;)
Ich bin auf den Test der AE-9 sehr gespannt. Meine beste Freundin wollte die unbedingt im Rechner haben und hat sie sich besorgt.
Ihr Rechner ist seh schön aufgeräumt was das Kabelmanagement angeht, aber dadurch die Hölle, wenn man ein weiteres PCIe Kabel anstecken will/muss. Viele Flüche später hat es dann geklappt. Soviel zu dem Thema, kannst du mal schnell meine Soundkarte einbauen. :)

Cunhell

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,293 Kommentare 19,077 Likes

Tipp:
Es gibt so windige PCIe zu Molex-Adapter, die man bei Grafikkarten ja nicht nehmen sollte. Aber hierfür geht das bestens! :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

Ghoster52

Urgestein

1,430 Kommentare 1,095 Likes

Das letzte was noch unter Linux anstandslos lief, war die Audigy2 & X-Fi.
Die Audigy4 & Z wurden zwar noch erkannt (aber kein Sound), weiß nicht ob es jetzt besser ist, Creative verweigert sich den Linux-Support. (n)

Ich hatte zuletzt (bis 2021) eine ESI@Juli SoKa im Linux-PC, schon sehr sehr alt aber dennoch sehr gut, nur leider kein KH-Ausgang.

PS: der "Realtek ALC1220" (Asrock Taichi RE / B550 & X570) läuft aktuell auf alle 3 Betriebssysteme ohne Fehler (Fehlfunktionen)
Win 10/11, Mint 19.3 und MX-Linux 21.
Der RME Adi 2 Pro AE hatte unter Mint leichte Stumm- und Umschalt-Knackser, wenn über USB angesteuert.
Schon fast unscheinbar, der kleine xDuoo X3 II DAP (32 Ohm@220mW), läuft auch auf allen Systemen ohne Treiber als USB-DAC (KHV).
Schade, die xDuoo DAPs sind seit der Chip-Krise nicht mehr lieferbar....

PPS: die AE-9 war für (alle meine) KH mit das Beste, was ich je im PC verbaut hatte,
nur lief die letztes Jahr noch nicht absturzsicher (lag es am X570 oder AMDs AGESA Version ???)

Nachtrag: Obwohl dem Sabber-DAC bei Asrock noch ein paar NE-5532 spendiert wurden, verhungern auch meine "guten" Kopfhörer
am "OnBoard-Soundchip" (D5000 25Ohm @106db, Oppo PM2+3 unter 50 Ohm @ 102db und auch ein günstiger OneOdio Pro50
32Ohm @ 110db, nur als Beispiele). Für genussvollen Sound ist KHV Pflicht, über DAC-Klang möchte ich mich nicht auslassen... :LOL:

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
c
cunhell

Urgestein

556 Kommentare 523 Likes

Ich wusste ja nicht mal, dass die Karte den PCIe-Anschluss hat und unter der Netzteilabdeckung war so wenig Platz, dass ich mir fast die Finger gebrochen habe. Und es wären eh nur SATA-Stromanschlüsse vorhanden gewesen. Molex hätte ich genauso reinfummeln müssen :)
Aber sie ist nun glücklich und das ist doch das wichtigste. Und ich hab was gut ;)

Cunhell

Antwort Gefällt mir

D
Deridex

Urgestein

2,218 Kommentare 851 Likes

Schöner Artikel.

Kleine Ergänzung:
- Meist sind es Schaltflanken (ist für die meisten wohl besser verständlich als Transienten) die rein streuen. Aus meiner Sicht sind da starke Schaltnetzteile mit stark variable Last ein ziemliches Problem.
- die EMV decken meines Wissens nach tatsächlich nicht den hörbaren Bereich ab
- Bei meinem Laptop habe ich ähnliches am Kopfhörerausgang festgestellt. Ich gehe davon aus, dass viele Laptops ebenfalls von der Problematik betroffen sind.

Antwort Gefällt mir

RedF

Urgestein

4,724 Kommentare 2,598 Likes

Habe eine GC-7 mit einem MMX 300 ist die mit der X4 vergleichbar?

Antwort Gefällt mir

F
Furda

Urgestein

663 Kommentare 371 Likes

Dieser PureClock kostet bei Oehlbach 69€, nicht 20€. Bin ich da beim falschen Produkt gelandet? 🤔

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,293 Kommentare 19,077 Likes

View image at the forums

Ich habs von Amazon. War billiger. 21 netto.

Antwort 1 Like

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung