Audio Audio/Peripherals Basics Gaming Headphones Headsets Practice Reviews Sound Systems Soundcards

Onboard sound disadvantages, problems, workarounds, external and internal solutions, headphone guide and basics

There are many possible reasons why something hums that shouldn’t and why you, in particular, are affected. If you break it down, there is a global and a local reason, so to speak, but always one after the other, because sometimes both apply at the same time, so don’t rejoice too soon!

Electricity is in the air: the 50 Hz plague (“The Big Hum”)

Who doesn’t know the slight humming sound caused by unplugged jack plugs or unearthed and switched off devices? You don’t even have to touch the contact surfaces with your fingers; it’s often enough that they’re lying around in the open. We are always and constantly concerned about microwaves, cell phone radiation and radio mice, but the 50 (or 60) Hz world hum (“The big hum”) is often ignored. At the same time, these rather long waves are really ubiquitous in any household! Every piece of cable acts as an antenna, and in this case it is bad luck that the frequency falls within the audible range. The first graph shows a 100 ms section from a measurement on a PC that is not switched on and physically also separated from the socket, which also eliminates the ground via the (common) protective earth conductor at the PC.

And please don’t be surprised that they are not nice sinusoidal waves, because this ideal case is rather the exception in the wild with the wave salad from all possible sources. Here it jiggles really nasty and I can still measure almost 5 mV “antenna voltage” at 1 kOhm input impedance. If I were to turn off all running, mains-powered devices in the room (and unfortunately there are far too many), this reading would decrease significantly. In my audio lab, where only a 48V DC network is available in the larger area, I then measure almost nothing. Feat.

All well and good, but this can be heard quite clearly on an analog amplifier, although the ground wire of the audio cable (here also used as a shield) actually has the contact to the PC case and the ground plane of the mainboard. But such an operation with the plug pulled out is not the rule. So I simply plug the power plug of the PC into the socket again. The difference is measurable and audible, because it is only 0.0003 instead of 0.005 volts. You have to turn up the volume on the amplifier to hear anything disturbing. But again, there’s still something there that you don’t really like. Albeit in very quiet.

Ok, now let’s run the PC and wait until the Windows desktop becomes visible. Now I measure with plenty of 2 mV, that is 0.0021 volts at the connection with 1 kOhm, the usual “PC noise”, which results as a sound carpet as a sum of all possible sources. This is exactly one of the problems of the onboard sound, but there is another chapter for that. This is first about the hum, which has now disappeared. But we can already see: something is actually always bothering.

By the way, the general rule is that asymmetrical cables (as in our case) always have the disadvantage that the signal is transmitted via the actual audio line and via the shielding in the cable, which also serves as a ground conductor. With balanced cables, which will certainly be the subject of the second part, the signal is transmitted via two different audio lines in the cable and no longer via the shielding, which also reduces the ground hum that will be described shortly.
 
The biggest advantage, however, is that these balanced cables virtually “cancel out” interference signals from outside. This works so well because the signals are oppositely polarized and thus phase-rotated. The signals subtract from each other and the interspersed noise signals are elegantly cancelled out. However, the effort for a symmetrical transmission is significantly higher and only a few devices in the PC sector can handle it. Anyone familiar with the so-called XLR connectors knows that they are hardly ever found on the rather inexpensive technology in the consumer sector.
 
The following picture (we already know this from the teaser) now shows interspersed noise signals (yellow curve), which we just discussed, and the dreaded ground hum caused by a so-called ground loop (blue curve).  And if you look very carefully, you will even discover a slight phase overlap of two different interference voltages in the blue curve. That’s something you really don’t want to hear in the interaction. But where does that actually come from?
 
Mass hum vs. interspersion
 

Escalation mode: the mass or ground loop and possible solutions

If you connect external amplifiers to your PC in an analog and not digital way, you might also know the slight humming noise that is difficult to eliminate at first glance, because all cables are actually of high enough quality and, above all, plugged in correctly. By the way, this effect also occurs on normal music systems if not all components are connected to the same socket or power strip. But the causes are usually the same, and if you don’t know them, you’ll quickly search yourself to death. This is because it is not only due to the cables and their shielding, but also to the so-called potential differences in the ground line (grounding, protective earth).

This ground hum, which is unfortunately clearly audible as interference voltage (also ground or earth loop), occurs when there is a so-called potential difference between the respective protective conductors (“grounding”) of the connected devices. This is caused by the internal resistances of the respective supply line up to the common ground or earth point. The further away this point is, the higher the probability of this potential difference leading to an interference current. DIN VDE 0100-410:2007-06 regulates the connection of all conductive enclosures with a grounded protective conductor and with the main grounding bar of the respective building / main connection. The ideal case would also still be a local equipotential bonding, which leads to the main grounding rail via a protective equipotential bonding conductor.

But if you’re not building your own house and you’ve put a lot of emphasis on hi-fi cabling, you can help yourself out here by plugging all the devices in question into the same power strip! If this is not possible, the shortest way to a common potential should be sought in spite of everything. Widely spaced sockets are highly problematic here. By the way, if you use balanced cabling, you are in the clear, since the interference current only flows through the shielding, which does not carry an audio signal. This also means that no more hum is generated by the flowing interference current. Only what do all those do who up to this point could not change (and reconnect) anything?

For these users, there is a simple but extremely effective solution: galvanic isolation by means of a ground isolator (“ground lift”).  Such a ground isolator (picture above) is simply used as an audio filter in the signal line. The whole thing has a nice side effect in the living room, if, for example, a receiver is still connected to a TV cable for the satellite system, a cable connection or an antenna. The very distant grounding points of such signal sources can also result in different ground potentials. I don’t want to know how many unnecessary and expensive electrician hours have been incurred by users due to such problems, although such an inexpensive filter would also have done the job.

The impedances of such filters with galvanic isolation are usually in the range between 500 ohms and 1 kOhm, which is completely unproblematic as long as the connection between the individual components is concerned. Low impedance inputs and outputs should not be used with this, however, as low frequencies may be lost. That should be enough for now, because if you follow the advice, the hum should be history. But if all those who like it more digital can hardly sit still in their chairs with gloating, they’ve rejoiced too soon. To do this, you just have to keep scrolling.

173 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

DrWandel

Mitglied

83 Kommentare 68 Likes

Danke für die ausführlichen Informationen!

Ich muss jedoch sagen, dass für meine Zwecke (vor allem Spielen und Hintergrundmusik) der Realtek ALC892 auf meinem X370-Board (MSI) völlig ausreicht. Brummen, Zirpen und ähnliche Effekte habe ich kaum wahrnehmbar. Sicher, das ist bestimmt keine HiFi, aber für mich gut genug. Vielleicht habe ich auch einfach nur Glück, aber auch über Kopfhörer ist der Sound recht ordentlich, obwohl ich meistens lieber meine uralten (ca. 30 Jahre) Sony-Aktivboxen verwende.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,292 Kommentare 19,076 Likes

Kaum ist nicht nicht ;)

Je potenter die Grafikkarte, umso mehr Grillen muss man zertreten :D

Antwort 1 Like

ipat66

Urgestein

1,368 Kommentare 1,366 Likes

Es lässt sich erahnen,warum wir länger auf diesen Artikel warten mussten.
Sehr informativ.
Da hat man noch für später was zu lesen !

Freue mich schon auf Teil 2...:)
Danke Igor

Antwort Gefällt mir

ssj3rd

Veteran

219 Kommentare 155 Likes

Hatte auch extreme Störgeräusche mit meiner On-Board Karte aber auch mit meiner intern verbauten Soundblaster AE9. Lustigerweise aber immer erst dann, sobald ich ein Spiel gestartet habe.
Nach vielen vielen testen und Herumprobieren mit (teils sehr teuren) abgeschirmten Cinch+Strom Kabeln hat schlussendlich ein kleines 10€ Wunder-Kästchen Ruhe im Karton verschafft: (der ja auch im Artikel erwähnt wird)
https://www.amazon.de/dp/B076JGVJGP...t_i_MBY9S0CEJQR0XDFXMYNC?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1
Da ich halt 5.1 habe musste ich natürlich 3 Stück davon abbringen, aber seitdem ist absolut Ruhe im Karton.
Da ich auch öfters beim Autoradio mal ein knistern hatte habe ich es auch dort angebracht, auch dort kein knistern mehr, nix.

Ist für mich echt ein kleines Zauber Kästchen 🙏

PS:
Übrigens hat bei mir eine externe Soundkarte über USB die exakt gleichen Störgeräusche auf den Boxen verursacht wie die interne. In die gleiche Steckdose stecken hat auch nicht geholfen, was genau ist den eine symmetrische Verkabelung von der hier im Artikel gesprochen wird?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Igor Wallossek

1

10,292 Kommentare 19,076 Likes

Dafür gibts ja den Goldfisch aus dem Oehlbach, der schnappt dann beim USB nach Luft :p

BTW: den Feintech habe ich ja im Artikel :D

View image at the forums

Antwort Gefällt mir

ssj3rd

Veteran

219 Kommentare 155 Likes

Damit ist was genau gemeint?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,292 Kommentare 19,076 Likes

Ertappt! Du hast den Artikel nicht gelesen :p

Seite 3:

Dein Feintech steht übrigens auf Seite 2 ;)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Ghoster52

Urgestein

1,430 Kommentare 1,095 Likes

Vielen Dank Igor! (y)
Zur AE-5 sei noch gesagt, den Stromanschluss benötigt man nur für den ARGB (scheiß) Streifen.
So ist es jedenfalls bei der NonPlus.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,292 Kommentare 19,076 Likes

Ich habe hier die AE-9 auch gerade ohne PCIe am Laufen ;)
Allerdings braucht der externe Kasten leider den 6-Pin

Antwort Gefällt mir

S
SpiritWolf448

Veteran

122 Kommentare 35 Likes

Schöner Artikel, Igor, der wie üblich Lust auf mehr macht. :)

Ich hier habe eine externe SoundBlasterX G6 in Gebrauch, gekoppelt an einen SwissSonic HAD-1 Kopfhörer-DAC von Thomann (via TOSLink). Damit befeuere ich meine Beyerdynamic DT990 (250 Ohm Variante). Ich bin kein Audiophiler, von daher kann ich sagen, das ich mit der Kombo sehr zufrieden bin. (Unter Windows. Linux benutze ich nicht, daher kann ich dazu nichts sagen.)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,292 Kommentare 19,076 Likes

Die G6 ist drin so ähnlich wie die X4 ;)

Antwort 1 Like

c
cunhell

Urgestein

556 Kommentare 523 Likes

Ich habe noch zwei SB X-Fi Titanium PCIe. eine davon an einer analogen 5.1 Anlage. Klingt einfach gut. Zumindest beim Zocken und für meine Ohren ;)
Ich bin auf den Test der AE-9 sehr gespannt. Meine beste Freundin wollte die unbedingt im Rechner haben und hat sie sich besorgt.
Ihr Rechner ist seh schön aufgeräumt was das Kabelmanagement angeht, aber dadurch die Hölle, wenn man ein weiteres PCIe Kabel anstecken will/muss. Viele Flüche später hat es dann geklappt. Soviel zu dem Thema, kannst du mal schnell meine Soundkarte einbauen. :)

Cunhell

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,292 Kommentare 19,076 Likes

Tipp:
Es gibt so windige PCIe zu Molex-Adapter, die man bei Grafikkarten ja nicht nehmen sollte. Aber hierfür geht das bestens! :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

Ghoster52

Urgestein

1,430 Kommentare 1,095 Likes

Das letzte was noch unter Linux anstandslos lief, war die Audigy2 & X-Fi.
Die Audigy4 & Z wurden zwar noch erkannt (aber kein Sound), weiß nicht ob es jetzt besser ist, Creative verweigert sich den Linux-Support. (n)

Ich hatte zuletzt (bis 2021) eine ESI@Juli SoKa im Linux-PC, schon sehr sehr alt aber dennoch sehr gut, nur leider kein KH-Ausgang.

PS: der "Realtek ALC1220" (Asrock Taichi RE / B550 & X570) läuft aktuell auf alle 3 Betriebssysteme ohne Fehler (Fehlfunktionen)
Win 10/11, Mint 19.3 und MX-Linux 21.
Der RME Adi 2 Pro AE hatte unter Mint leichte Stumm- und Umschalt-Knackser, wenn über USB angesteuert.
Schon fast unscheinbar, der kleine xDuoo X3 II DAP (32 Ohm@220mW), läuft auch auf allen Systemen ohne Treiber als USB-DAC (KHV).
Schade, die xDuoo DAPs sind seit der Chip-Krise nicht mehr lieferbar....

PPS: die AE-9 war für (alle meine) KH mit das Beste, was ich je im PC verbaut hatte,
nur lief die letztes Jahr noch nicht absturzsicher (lag es am X570 oder AMDs AGESA Version ???)

Nachtrag: Obwohl dem Sabber-DAC bei Asrock noch ein paar NE-5532 spendiert wurden, verhungern auch meine "guten" Kopfhörer
am "OnBoard-Soundchip" (D5000 25Ohm @106db, Oppo PM2+3 unter 50 Ohm @ 102db und auch ein günstiger OneOdio Pro50
32Ohm @ 110db, nur als Beispiele). Für genussvollen Sound ist KHV Pflicht, über DAC-Klang möchte ich mich nicht auslassen... :LOL:

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
c
cunhell

Urgestein

556 Kommentare 523 Likes

Ich wusste ja nicht mal, dass die Karte den PCIe-Anschluss hat und unter der Netzteilabdeckung war so wenig Platz, dass ich mir fast die Finger gebrochen habe. Und es wären eh nur SATA-Stromanschlüsse vorhanden gewesen. Molex hätte ich genauso reinfummeln müssen :)
Aber sie ist nun glücklich und das ist doch das wichtigste. Und ich hab was gut ;)

Cunhell

Antwort Gefällt mir

D
Deridex

Urgestein

2,218 Kommentare 851 Likes

Schöner Artikel.

Kleine Ergänzung:
- Meist sind es Schaltflanken (ist für die meisten wohl besser verständlich als Transienten) die rein streuen. Aus meiner Sicht sind da starke Schaltnetzteile mit stark variable Last ein ziemliches Problem.
- die EMV decken meines Wissens nach tatsächlich nicht den hörbaren Bereich ab
- Bei meinem Laptop habe ich ähnliches am Kopfhörerausgang festgestellt. Ich gehe davon aus, dass viele Laptops ebenfalls von der Problematik betroffen sind.

Antwort Gefällt mir

RedF

Urgestein

4,724 Kommentare 2,597 Likes

Habe eine GC-7 mit einem MMX 300 ist die mit der X4 vergleichbar?

Antwort Gefällt mir

F
Furda

Urgestein

663 Kommentare 371 Likes

Dieser PureClock kostet bei Oehlbach 69€, nicht 20€. Bin ich da beim falschen Produkt gelandet? 🤔

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,292 Kommentare 19,076 Likes

View image at the forums

Ich habs von Amazon. War billiger. 21 netto.

Antwort 1 Like

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung