CPU Motherboard Reviews Workstations

AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D Review with Gaming and Workstation – Ultra-fast gaming with half the fuel of a Core i9-13900K

Take a Ryzen 7 7700X, piggyback some 3D V-cache and halve the power consumption of the Intel Core i9-13900K. The half Ryzen 9 7950X is ready, which now comes to the customer as Ryzen 7 7800X3D without the second die and can still usually act just as fast in gaming. It’s not squaring the circle, but it’s close. As long as you use applications, i.e. games, that can also fully utilize the cache in terms of feed. Away from that, it gets a bit tighter, but gamers were probably less interested in that.

Nevertheless, I will test both gaming AND also workstation, because the required “whitelist” of suitable applications is omitted here and the only CCD with the V-Cache always has to work, whether it wants to or not. The fact that gaming works isn’t really an issue, but the overall work environment is actually the much more exciting topic. The Ryzen 7 7800X3D is also limited by the power limit (board manufacturer?), which I personally approve of. I will be happy to prove that this is not a criterion for exclusion. But our Ryzen with the Janus head has two faces and that’s exactly what I want to show you today. Enthusiasm or disappointment aside. Both are simply part of the game.

Update from 08.04.2023 at 05.25 a.m.

After an attentive reader’s tip, I also noticed that there was still a calculation error in the cumulative overviews of the power consumption. While the single data of all games was correct as usual, there was a calculation error in the final summary because I had removed some games from the test field again for plausibility reasons. Since I handle and calculate the power consumption separately from the performance, I unfortunately did not notice this circumstance.

However, the overall picture and the assessment do not change at all, especially since the order of the CPUs remains exactly the same. After all, all tested CPUs were affected to the same extent. But since I attach great importance to transparency and accuracy, I have of course corrected the values and replaced all the graphics. By the way, I didn’t have to change the text, it is still valid. Thank you for your understanding! Something like this can happen in the daily stress, but it should not.

The new AMD Ryzen 7800X3D ‘Zen 4 Raphael’ with specifications

Let’s finally get to the new CPU, which is also based on the Zen 4 core architecture and is basically a halved version of the well-known Ryzen 9 7950X3D. The fact that the nomenclature differs somewhat with the X3D is due to the special construction and the (stacked) 3D-V cache mounted on the single CCD. The model without V-cache is the Ryzen 7 7700X, except that the die is removed to make room for the cache.

 

The AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D tested today offers a count of 8 cores and 16 threads, which is retained from the previous two generations and the current X version. The CPU has a base frequency of 4.2 GHz instead of the Ryzen 7 7700X’s 4.5 GHz and a boost clock of up to 5.0 GHz (5.5 GHz for the Ryzen 7 7700X). One should have gone to the limits here and exhausted what is still somehow stably possible within the 120 W TDP (105 watts for the Ryzen 7 7700X, 90 watts for my motherboard). As for the cache, the CPU has a total of 104 MB of cache. The CPU consists of an IOD and a single chiplet (CCD). The MSRP is $449, which is about 50 Euros higher than the Ryzen 7 7700X, whose street price is currently only about $345

Important preliminary remark about the test field and the test methodology

The fact that I decided to use a GeForce RTX 4090 and not a Radeon RX 7900XTX as a graphics card after some plausibility tests in the run-up, I certainly don’t have to comment at length, because I will test all four resolutions of interest from 1280 x 720 pixels to 3840 x 2160 pixels this time and need a graphics card that is as non-limiting as possible for that. In fact, we will see later that there are even games that can show differences in Ultra HD, even without DLSS. Unfortunately, this was no longer possible with the Radeon RX 7900XTX.

Since the new Ryzen 7 7800X3D is more about the question of when and if the 3D V-cache is of any use, I had tested almost 20 games in advance and analyzed their behavior. After that, I sorted out games with similar results and kept one of each in the pool. This ranges from enormous performance gains to no response at all. And I’ll talk about a game that AMD even had in the slides themselves, because it simply doesn’t belong in such a slide and distorts everything. You can’t use it that way.

Rainbow Six Extraction prefers CPUs with fewer cores and even the tests in 720p and 1080p are neither plausible nor usable in a direct comparison. Of course, that’s also a statement, and that’s exactly why I bring up this bad example right in the introduction. that’s exactly why I controlled the benchmarks very carefully and tried to use as representative a mix as possible without such dropouts in the end. Unfortunately, some things have fallen by the wayside. In fact, you can actually pre-program any conclusion through a targeted selection of games (which doesn’t do anyone any good), so you really have to differentiate hard here.

I have counter-tested this on a few systems and always came to the same, yet very skewed result. That’s why I removed this game from the statistics again, even though it was given completely with all CPUs. A lot of effort for nothing. So much more important here are the games that decide victory or defeat in a fair and balanced way, and their weighting. For this I also let myself be guided a little by the experiences of the very (time)consuming workstation part.

I also don’t want to hide the fact that I once again and very consciously decided against my Z790 system for the Intel test system and rely on a very stable running Z690 system. To be fair, I’ve been a bit suspicious of the performance loss on the Z790 boards since Intel’s last IME update and the new BIOSes. Between two similar boards from the same manufacturer, there was up to 5% performance difference after all updates (and once even more) with otherwise the same RAM and CPU. I deliberately deviate from AMD’s system configuration, but you have to be fair. Raptor Lake Refresh? This is perhaps how you create certain “progress” at Intel in advance.

In general, I already decided against simply continuing to use older results when testing the Ryzen 9 7950X3D because there were simply too many differences in the last few months. Even if it would have shortened the time considerably. New AGESA versions, new chipset drivers, game updates and graphics card drivers. And you just don’t work with interpolation and calculators. I need almost a day per SKU with gaming and workstation, which also explains the test scope better. But then at least the results are right. And so I also included the Ryzen 9 7900X3D in the tests this time, which MIFCOM was kind enough to lend me.

More articles from igor’sLABon the topic of Ryzen 7000

At this point, I also want to introduce further articles that round off the launch article, because everything doesn’t fit into a single review and there would also be too much redundant content. Therefore, I ask you to simply read across here if there is a need for further information.

 

330 Antworten

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Ginmarr

Mitglied

68 Kommentare 25 Likes

Ist gekauft :D Aber ich warte noch paar Wochen ^^

Antwort Gefällt mir

Case39

Urgestein

2,543 Kommentare 962 Likes

Wie zu erwarten eine Top Leistung AMDs. Wann soll die CPU verfügbar sein?

Antwort Gefällt mir

c
com1

Mitglied

11 Kommentare 3 Likes

Ab 06.04. kann man die erwerben. Vielleicht hat AMD ja einen Berg produziert und deswegen war der 7950X3D so schlecht erhältlich... Bin gespannt.

Antwort 1 Like

Gregor Kacknoob

Urgestein

529 Kommentare 443 Likes

Und wenn die X3D Familie explizit für Gamer gedacht ist, dann macht man mit einer Kaufempfehlung für Gamer absolut alles richtig. Mensch, vergiss doch mal kurz das Arbeitstier in dir und lasse den Gamer sprechen. Jaa, geiler Prozessor zum zoggön o/

Antwort 3 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,420 Kommentare 19,430 Likes

Die X3D-Familie basiert ja auf dem Epyc und der ist nun mal zum Arbeiten da. :D

Der Honk in mir hatte den Knopf auch schon auf der Bestellung, aber es sind ja immerhin 500 Euro. Habs trotzdem gemacht, der hat ja einen Kauftipp :D

Trotzdem würde ich mich beeilen. Es sind welche auf Lager, aber die Stückzahlen... Ich weiß nicht, ob die Leute bei dem aktuellen Preis trotzdem losrammeln. Dann wirds knapp. Aber eine Daddel-CPU mit 40 Watt.... Mega!

Antwort 8 Likes

Rudi69

Mitglied

16 Kommentare 6 Likes

Noch effizienter als der 79503D. Wahnsinn! :love:Die meisten Spiele werden wohl mit gerade einmal mit 40 Watt laufen... Wenn ich da an mein ex i9-10850K denke der wohl bei gleichen Settings das dreifache an Saft gezogen hätte.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,420 Kommentare 19,430 Likes

Mein Q6600 fraß locker 160 Watt mit OC bei 4 GHz. Immerhin hielt der gefühlte Ewigkeiten. Die CPU samt DFI Lanparty X38 laufen immer noch. Zusammen mit dem Adata Extreme (der gute rote) :D

Antwort 2 Likes

CyberNomad7

Neuling

7 Kommentare 1 Likes

@Igor Wallossek

Hast du ausprobiert wieviel man über die PBO Curve noch optimieren kann?

Antwort 1 Like

FritzHunter01

Moderator

1,178 Kommentare 1,599 Likes

Erwartungen erfüllt....

Schnelleste Gaming-CPU ever (sogar in noch UHD messbar), die sparsamste Gaming-CPU ever!
Intel wird insbesondere in Sachen Effizienz gnadenlos gedemütigt --> genau mein Humor!

Antwort 5 Likes

ssj3rd

Veteran

225 Kommentare 156 Likes
RedF

Urgestein

4,798 Kommentare 2,669 Likes

Der liefert echt ab, ist mir mit peripherie aber zu teuer.
( noch macht der 5800X3D ja ganz gut mit )

Antwort 4 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,420 Kommentare 19,430 Likes

Nicht mehr viel. Der ist schon am minimalistischen Limit. Zumal mein Brett lustigerweise eh nur 90 Watt freigibt. Mehr Takt bekomme ich auch beim 7950X3D nicht mehr hin, da gehen keine 100 MHz.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,420 Kommentare 19,430 Likes

Die Shops haben den heute erst physikalisch geliefert bekommen, da war AMD echt vorsichtig :D
Ab morgen dann auch über den Tresen...

Antwort 1 Like

c
cunhell

Urgestein

561 Kommentare 527 Likes

Mein Xeon E5-2697v3 hat schon im Idle mehr gezogen als der 7800X3D beim Zocken :)

Cunhell

Antwort 1 Like

hrcn

Mitglied

21 Kommentare 21 Likes

Danke für deinen Test inkl. re-benchen mit all den anderen CPUs. Und für die klaren Worte zum Thema Effizienz bzw. dass du das so herausstellst! AMD führt Intel hier regelrecht vor.

Wie erwartet eine wahnsinnig gute CPU für Spieler. Der Preis von etwa 500€ habe ich auch in etwa erwartet, dürfte vielen Leuten aber auch gerade im Hinblick auf die weiterhin hohen Plattformkosten ein bisschen zu hoch sein. Dennoch wird die CPU wahrscheinlich sofort ausverkauft sein, auf lange Sicht muss der Preis aber mMn gute 100€ runter.

Antwort 1 Like

Ghoster52

Urgestein

1,442 Kommentare 1,111 Likes

:eek: Mein Sohn hat den auch auf 4 GHz geknüppelt auf ein NForce Brett

Antwort 2 Likes

Tronado

Urgestein

3,895 Kommentare 2,048 Likes

Sehr nett die CPU, aber wirklich nur für's Spielen. Effizienz als Kaufargument? Bei 25W Unterschied doch eher nicht. Da gönne ich dem PC aber sehr gerne die 15€ im Jahr, ach nee, wird ja schon wieder billiger der Strom.

Antwort Gefällt mir

hrcn

Mitglied

21 Kommentare 21 Likes

Es geht ja nicht nur um die Stromkosten, sondern auch um Abwärme.

Antwort 4 Likes

Tronado

Urgestein

3,895 Kommentare 2,048 Likes

Bei 60W ist die Abwärme auch kein Problem, Beim Multitasking-Arbeiten ab 200W wird's interessant..

Antwort 2 Likes

Danke für die Spende



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About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

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