CPU Motherboard Reviews Workstations

AMD Ryzen 9 7950X3D Gaming and Workstation Review – Intel’s Core i9-13900K(S) lost the “Gaming Crown”

Sure, the title sounds lurid at first, but it actually contains everything that really characterized this review of the AMD Ryzen 9 7950X3D, because this is where a highly efficient and in many areas really extremely fast CPU meets smaller, self-imposed hurdles. This may sound more dramatic at first than it really is in the end, and it shouldn’t be anything that can’t be solved. But in order to be able to call up the full potential and then also appreciate it accordingly, I have to go a bit further this time. Euphoria is allowed, of course, but you can’t just iron out the worry lines either.

The new AMD Ryzen 7950X3D ‘Zen 4 Raphael’ with specifications

Let’s finally get to the new CPU, which is also based on the Zen 4-core architecture and is basically derived from the well-known Ryzen 9 7950X. The fact that the nomenclature differs somewhat with the X3D is due to the special construction and the (stacked) 3D-V cache mounted on one of the two CCDs. Both CCDs are nevertheless the same height in the end, because in order to be able to place the cache, the die in question is simply ground down to fit beforehand. The heatspreader therefore also remains the same.

 

The AMD Ryzen 9 7950X3D tested today offers a count of 16 cores and 32 threads, which is retained from the previous two generations and the current X version. The CPU has a base frequency of 4.2 instead of the 4.5 GHz and a boost clock of up to 5.7 GHz (5.85 GHz F-Max) on the core without 3D cache. One should have gone to the limits here and exhausted what is still somehow stably possible within the 120 W TDP (162 W PPT). As for the cache, the CPU has a total of 128 MB L3 and 16 MB L2 cache. The CPU consists of an IOD and two chiplets (CCD). The flagship will cost 789 Euros incl. VAT in Germany. (MSRP), which is cheaper than they had called for the Ryzen 9 7950X at launch.

Important preliminary remark about the test field and the test methodology

The fact that I decided to use a GeForce RTX 4090 and against a Radeon RX 7900XTX as graphics card after some plausibility tests in the run-up, I surely don’t have to comment at length, because I will test all four resolutions of interest from 1280 x 720 pixels to 3840 x 2160 pixels this time and need a graphics card that is as non-limiting as possible for that. In fact, we will see later that there are even games that can show differences in Ultra HD, even without DLSS. Unfortunately, this was no longer possible with the Radeon RX 7900XTX.

Since the new Ryzen 9 7950X3D is more about the question of when and whether the 3D V-cache is useful at all, as well as which hurdles have to be cleared so that the optimal die is selected, I tested almost 20 games in advance and analyzed their behavior. After that, I sorted out games with similar results and kept one of each in the pool. This ranges from enormous performance gains to no response at all. And I’ll talk about a game that AMD even had in the slides themselves, because it simply doesn’t belong in such a slide and distorts everything.

Yes, the Ryzen 9 7950X is a few percentage points ahead of the Intel Core i9-13900K here, but unfortunately you always have to see it in the overall context as well, since almost every smaller CPU is simply faster. I have counter-tested this on a few systems and always came to the same, yet very skewed result. Since the results from the Ryzen 9 7950X and 7950X3D are almost exactly the same, we can assume a complete ignorance of the 3D cache here, especially since this game only generates very few threads with real loads. Apparently, the correct assignment does not work at all then. That’s why I removed this game from the statistics again, even though it was given completely with all CPUs. A lot of effort for nothing.

So much more important here are the games that decide victory or defeat in a fair and balanced way, and their weighting. For this I also let myself be guided a little by the experiences of the very (time)consuming workstation part. I also don’t want to hide the fact that I deliberately decided against my Z790 system for the Intel test system and rely on a very stable running Z690 system. To be fair, I’ve been a bit suspicious of the performance loss on the Z790 boards since Intel’s last IME update and the new BIOSes. Between two similar boards from the same manufacturer, there was up to 5% performance difference after all updates (and once even more) with otherwise the same RAM and CPU. I deliberately deviate from AMD’s system configuration with this, but you have to be fair. Raptor Lake Refresh? This is perhaps how you create certain “progress” at Intel in advance.

In general, I decided against continuing to use older results because there were simply too many differences in the last few months. Even if it would have shortened the time considerably. New AGESA versions, new chipset drivers, game updates and graphics card drivers. And you just don’t work with interpolation and calculators. I need almost one day per SKU with gaming and workstation, which also explains the test scope better. But then at least the results are right.

Cache or clock, or both?

It was puzzled beforehand how AMD would manage to select the optimal die for each process, i.e. to make the important decision which of the two CCDs is the optimal one for an application. More cache or better more clock? And what happens if there are more than 16 threads? Or an application lands on the “wrong” CCD over and over again? Automatisms or not, you will always run into the limits and find negative examples, like I did in the workstation test.

Unfortunately, important entries are still missing in the current BIOSes to be able to enter one’s preferences manually and independent of the operating system. When I asked the motherboard manufacturer, they told me that this was possible, but that it was blocked for the time being due to a lack of clearance (communication!). Meanwhile, some manufacturers are said to have distributed this feature as a beta version on their own risk. It is not pretty and I could therefore not test it, although AMD had explicitly pointed out this option to the reviewers.

AMD didn’t told our BIOS team to enable this feature when 7000X3D is installed. So existing BIOS follows original rule: this option is not available

 

And if it can’t be done manually, what does the automatism do? Games are still relatively easy to recognize here, because you won’t find so many other applications that (exclusively) run in full screen on the desktop. And yet AMD is challenged here to offer some kind of program that works as a graphically designed white list and where I can explicitly prioritize my own applications myself. That would have been the least we could have expected, even in the run-up to the launch. Unfortunately, AMD has not delivered exactly that so far. We will see later where something like this could have helped in productive use. I had communicated my concerns to AMD in detail beforehand, but in the end (just like everyone else) I only got a terse mail that everything was completely uncomplicated:

at launch AMD will publish a blog with simple steps to get ready for X3D. The process should be very similar to any other upgrade or new build setup
  1. Update the system BIOS & chipset driver. This is the only required step.
  2. Run all Windows updates & Microsoft Store updates – Including the Xbox Game Bar App. Windows Updates and Microsoft Store updates are on by default.
  3. Ensure Windows “Settings > Gaming > Game Mode” has Game mode set to On. Game mode is on by default in Windows 11, but worth double checking.
  4. Reboot & wait a few minutes for logon scheduled tasks to run.
  5. Game!

Customers will be required to update the BIOS and chipset driver – however all other software will update automatically over the course of time.

 

Jain. If I had only done that alone, my results today would have been about 3 percent worse. At least. Other colleagues also had this value as a difference. i don’t want to dissect this in detail now, but there is a nice command-line workaround that even AMD gave the reviewers to achieve the best possible values. Stupidly, most here aborted because no one noticed that the command line input was still running. Even with a freshly installed Windows, this can take 15 to 30 minutes, I even had to wait a whopping 53 minutes on my system, during which you should do NOTHING on the PC!

To AMD’s credit, it has to be said that the execution ofidle tasks primarily helps the system to complete pending tasks. But that is only one side of the coin, because often enough some program from the background pushed itself back onto the “good” CCD during the tests. If you love command lines and a smooth running system, you should already do this. After all, this is possible on any Windows computer:

%windir%system32rundll32.exe advapi32.dll,ProcessIdleTasks

 

If you are afraid of the puristic input, here is a small tinkering instruction for all with administrator account:

  • Right-click the desktop and select: New -> Shortcut
  • Enter the path for the item: %windir%system32rundll32.exe advapi32.dll,ProcessIdleTasks
  • Click Next
  • On the next screen, enter a name for this shortcut (e.g. Edit running tasks)
  • Click Finish

The shortcut is now created, and whenever you feel that the system is no longer responding smoothly to commands, simply execute this command and the system should run again.

More articles from igor’sLABon the topic of Ryzen 7000

At this point, I also want to introduce further articles that round off the launch article, because everything doesn’t fit into a single review and there would also be too much redundant content. Therefore, I ask you to simply read across here if there is a need for further information.

 

229 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

A
A1MSTAR_

Mitglied

68 Kommentare 31 Likes

danke für die tests

mein fazit:
also kann man overall sagen das intel 13900k schneller ist weil dieser eben mit deutlich schnelleren ram mega gut skaliert (da kann man ja zb. easy 8000mhz drauf packen) - es wurde hier ja lediglich 6200mhz ram verwendet bei Intel.

und man kann den 13900k auch wunderbar übertakten :)

ps: ich verstehe nicht wieso man der cpu/chipsatz nicht das gibt was sie/er schafft -> kann der ryzen zb nur 6400mhz dann gib ihm doch die 6400mhz - kann der intel 8000mhz dann sollte er auch diese erhalten um seine volle leistung zu entfalten

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,173 Kommentare 18,758 Likes

Auch dann schafft er es nicht. Und der 13900K säuft sich zu Tode. Die Performance skaliert nun einmal nicht linear mit dem RAM-Takt.

Antwort 11 Likes

D
Denniss

Urgestein

1,514 Kommentare 547 Likes

Es wurde gleicher RAM genutzt um Einfluß auf den CPU-Vergleich rauszunehmen. 8000er RAM wird sicherlich nicht so einfach bei Raptor Lake laufen und wenn dann mit reichlich hoher Spannung. Würde dann aber auch zum saufenden OC 13900K passen

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,173 Kommentare 18,758 Likes

Wer behauptet, er bekomme 8000er auf einem normalen Z790 zum Laufen, der lügt sich selbst in die Tasche. Booten vielleicht, aber nicht stabil in Applikationen.

Antwort 10 Likes

Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,337 Likes

Wird ne knappe Kiste mit dem 13700K und dem 7800X3D.
Mit 143Watt und richtiger Optimierung könnte der 7950X3D dann schon gut an einen Standard 7950X ran kommen.
Schöner Test.

Antwort 1 Like

A
A1MSTAR_

Mitglied

68 Kommentare 31 Likes

was ist denn ein unnormales z790 ? ;)

war ja jetzt auch nur ein beispiel und es gibt einige auf diversen seiten die 8000mhz ddr5 beim 13900k mit einem hochwertigen board zum laufen bekommen haben. (problemlos) und auch komplett stable sind.

7600mhz läuft mit jeder halbwegs guten cpu und einem "normalen z790" (was auch immer normal und unnormal bedeutet)

add: die effizienzkrone hat der 7950x3d aufjedenfall ... bei allem anderen find ich es "fragwürdig" vorallem hätte man auch den "schnellsten amd" vs "schnellsten intel" testen können ... und nicht den "schnellsten amd" vs "zweit schnellsten intel"

trotzdem danke für die tests und die viele arbeit :)

Antwort Gefällt mir

P
Pokerclock

Veteran

424 Kommentare 362 Likes

Rein interessehalber gefragt. Wie sieht das denn bei Vollbestückung aus, sprich 128 GB RAM? Ich finde nirgends verlässlich Tipps und Praxisberichte zu Systemen mit Vollbestückung. Egal, ob AMD oder Intel. Ich habe imme rmehr mit Workstations zu tun und da ist das die Normalität. Oftmals geht kaum mehr als DDR5-3600.

Antwort 1 Like

SchmoWu

Mitglied

91 Kommentare 23 Likes

Danke für den Test.
Klingt soweit super, ist mir zum reinen Spielen aber zu "dick".
Umsomehr freue ich mich auf den 7800X3D.
Der kleine soll ja die selbe TDP haben, kann man dann mit bischen mehr Leistung oder weniger Verbrauch rechnen?
AMD spricht immer von 6000MHz als Optimum für den Speicher, schaffen die im Regelfall tatsächlich schon mehr?

mfg
Schmo

Antwort 1 Like

M
MasterElwood

Neuling

6 Kommentare 1 Likes

Danke für den Test in der gewohnten IGOR-Qualität!

"Meine Bitte an AMD wäre, da ich das hybride Konzept mit den zwei unterschiedlichen CCDs durchaus interessant finde: Ein simples White-List-Programm, wo man als Anwender seine präferenzierten Applikationen hinterlegen kann, die dann per Voreinstellung explizit den CCD mit dem Cache oder den mit dem höheren Takt priorisieren."

Was ist mit Tools wie Process Lasso? Könnte man das nicht dort integrieren?

Wobei ich trotzdem der Meinung bin, das sollte alles AUTOMATISCH passieren und die CPU sollte von selbst erkennen, ob Cache oder Takt gefragt ist. Das ist schon AMD´s Aufgabe das zu lösen, so dass die CPU immer optimal arbeitet!

Antwort Gefällt mir

M
Moeppel

Urgestein

862 Kommentare 312 Likes

Das hatte fast was von Eier auf den Tisch latzen.

Generell steht und fällt das Ganze zukünftig mit der Whitelist Handhabe. Als mehr Linux als Windows Nutzer diese Tage kämpft man hier auch mit zwei Schedulern und ggf. zwei Arten der Wartung.

Ich hoffe, dass man es nicht versaut.

HWUnboxed hat pauschal einen 7800X3D über die Suite hinweg simuliert, nachdem Factorio ein sehr dubioses Ergebnis lieferte.

Der 7800X3D wird ein Klotzer.

Antwort 1 Like

G
Guest

Beeindruckendes Gerät.
Ich fand die Design-Idee mit einen CCD mit 3D-Cache interessant und mutig und zum Glück scheint es auch zu funktionieren. Schön.
Auf kurze Sicht ist der 7800x3D vielleicht sogar noch interessanter für reine Spielernaturen. Aber der 7950x3D ist einfach schon beeindruckend und bringt zusätzlich noch reichlich Kerne, sollte es denn mal eng werden.
Schon früher fand ich den Ansatz besser mit mehr Cache & Co zu arbeiten. Logisch, dass das hin und wieder auch mal nichts bringt. Aber wenn, dann bei dem gigantische Cache ja auch mal richtig was. Der Preis ist natürlich sportlich. Aber man muss ja meistens nicht und wird meistens nicht gezwungen. Finde das öfter lustig zu lesen, wenn einige Leute direkt wieder Geld ausm Fenster werfen müssen :D. Naja der 5900x reicht noch ne Weile. Technisch überzeugt mich der Ansatz jedenfalls deutlich mehr als "wir setzen ein irre hohes Powerlimit und lassen bis zum Anschlag rasseln". "Und den Boardpartnern sagen wir: komm, schaltet das Powerlimit gleich aus, is noch geiler".

Antwort 2 Likes

Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,337 Likes

Das kannst im Bios machen.

Antwort 1 Like

p
pintie

Veteran

172 Kommentare 131 Likes

Kenne das Problem. 128GB funktionieren zur Zeit nur in sehr wenigen kombinationen. Bei meinem Dell Notebook mit den neuen Riegelformat laufen 128GB DDR5 aber mit deutlich reduziertem Takt.
bei den AMDs hab ich 128GB noch nicht stabil zum laufen bekommen. Da kommt man nicht an Epic vorbei

Antwort Gefällt mir

M
MasterElwood

Neuling

6 Kommentare 1 Likes

Der wohl UNPRAKTISCHTE Ort für sowas. Aber wie gesagt: ich will auch nicht dort - ich will AUTOMATSCH!

Antwort 1 Like

Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,337 Likes

Ähhhh wenn du extra ne Software verwendest und es zuweisen musst ist es doch auch nicht Automatisch......
Wie es am Ende aussehen wird müssen genaue Test zeigen.

View image at the forums

Antwort 1 Like

grimm

Urgestein

3,081 Kommentare 2,034 Likes

Nach meinen Erfahrungen mit der Kühlung des 5800X3D bin ich starker Befürworter von Layouts mit zwei CCDs und der Whitelist Lösung. Ist doch echt deppert, dass AMD das nicht anbietet.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,173 Kommentare 18,758 Likes

Lies mal meinen Bericht. Asus hat das als Beta auf eigene Kappe geöffnet, die anderen nicht. AMD hatte es NICHT freigegegeben.

Antwort 1 Like

g
genervt

Mitglied

50 Kommentare 10 Likes

Hast du Probleme mit der Kühlung? Ich finde der 5800X3D verhält sich sehr ähnlich zum 3700X, den ich vorher hatte.
Bleibt problemlos unter 70° mit meinem Alpenföhn Brocken3.

Zum Thema: bin positiv überrascht bzgl. Effizienz und Leistungsgewinn beim 7950X3D.
Saubere Arbeit. Bin selbst aber AM4 treu geblieben mit dem 5800X3D. Verschafft mir wieder Ruhe für 3 Jahre +

Antwort 2 Likes

Gregor Kacknoob

Urgestein

524 Kommentare 442 Likes

Yeay, da hat sich das Zögern doch gelohnt. Nun noch ein paar Erfahrungsberichte abwarten und in ein paar Monaten darf dann Projekt - Unvernunft V2 starten o/

Antwort 2 Likes

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung