CPU Motherboard Reviews Workstations

AMD Ryzen 9 7950X and Ryzen 7 7700X Review with gaming and workstation benchmarks- A new era begins with Zen 4 an the new Socket AM5

AMD let us release tests of the four new Zen 4 CPUs today in the form of the Ryzen 9 7950X, Ryzen 9 7900X, Ryzen 7 7700X and Ryzen 5 7600X. We have already reported about it for a long time, but now the necessary test samples are finally materializing in the form of the real CPUs, which can provide answers to the many questions that have been burning our interest for weeks. Whereby, in addition to the initial answers, new questions have also emerged as a result of the tests. But more on that (and in other follow-ups), of course. But for now, we want to focus on today’s tests before the final products are officially on retailers’ shelves tomorrow.

Well, who has the longest? Box of the Ryzen 9 7950X

Important preliminary remark about the test field and the test methodology

The fact that I only have two CPUs in the test field today with the Ryzen 9 7950X and the Ryzen 7 7700X for the time being is simply due to the fact that the other two samples are still lost in the unfathomable depths of global world trade for logistical reasons and AMD has also insisted that no one is supported in a more or less legal way by already supplied retailers in order to maintain equal opportunities for all editors. You can look at it either way, but in the end it doesn’t make a difference because you can retest. Personally, I think the two missing copies are highly interesting alternatives, but of course I will make up for that and dutifully follow the rules.

I’m deliberately putting the second sentence in the introduction this time so that it doesn’t get read over again. I test ALL processors with the default options of the motherboard manufacturers, as they were also communicated by the two chip manufacturers. That’s why I don’t stick rigidly to PL1 and PL2 with Intel and Alder Lake, but rather let the whole thing run rather unlimited with the respective PL2 corner data even with PL1. AMD can be happy about Precision Boost Overdrive in Zen 3 and Zen 4, which has already been preset by default. The normal user will not manually cap the power consumption to the respective TDP class anyway. I also refer to a counter-test that I once did for PBO and that shows that the power consumption does not increase disproportionately in games, but the performance does.

So the whole thing today is also a kind of test with the buyer, even though I still have a lot to report about the cooling. It is also important to me that I test all current platforms, i.e. Alder Lake and Zen 4 with DDR5 6000 CL30, which I will then also continue for Raptor Lake for better comparability. I got the appropriate RAM, which also ran everything stable and problem-free via XMP (Intel) and EXPO (AMD). The AM4 system ran with DDR4 3600 CL14. All CPUs were cooled equally well, at least within the limits of what they allowed. But we will come to the exact test setup in a moment. I didn’t test other CPUs like the 11 models in today’s test (and the two still to come) due to time constraints, but that’s what the older tests are for, to restore the relation if necessary.

Further follow-ups on the Ryzen 7000 topic

At this point, I also want to introduce further articles that will round off the launch article afterwards, because everything doesn’t fit into a single review, it would simply be too much. Besides the RAM, the cooling will of course also play a role, so stay tuned!

The big Ryzen 7000 Memory and OC Tuning Guide – Infinity Fabric, EXPO, Dual-Rank, Samsung and Hynix DDR5 in Practice test with Benchmarks and Recommendations

The new CPUs: AMD Ryzen 7000 ‘Zen 4 Raphael’ including specifications

We finally come to the CPUs, which, as already mentioned, initially consist of four SKUs based on the Zen 4 core architecture, the AMD Ryzen 9 7950X, AMD Ryzen 9 7900X, AMD Ryzen 7 7700X and the AMD Ryzen 5 7600X. The fact that the nomenclature is slightly different and a Ryzen 7 7800X is currently missing naturally leaves room for speculation. They will simply want to keep their backs open for another CPU, which could possibly be a counter to Intel’s upcoming 13th CPU. Generation could represent. So that you don’t have to risk a name confusion like with the Ryzen 7 5800 X3D, the courage to leave a gap remains for the time being.

Before we turn to the core specifications of these four SKUs, we must point out that the AMD Ryzen 7000 CPUs are based on a TSMC 5nm process node with a CCD die size of 70mm2 compared to 83mm2 for Zen 3 and feature a total of 6.57 billion transistors, a 58% increase over the Zen 3 CCD with 4.  The CPUs adopt the Zen 4 architecture, which brings a 13% IPC increase, but most of the performance benefit comes from the higher clock speeds and a higher TDP added to each chip compared to the previous generation.

   

AMD has announced an increase of up to 29% in single-threaded performance, over 35% in multi-threaded performance, and 25% better perf/watt when comparing Zen 4 and Zen 3 cores, and it will be my pleasure to review that today as well. The IOD of the new CPUs is manufactured on the 6nm process node and accommodates an iGPU with 2 RDNA 2 compute units that operate at up to 2200 MHz. The size of the chip is 124.7 mm2, which is almost the same as that of the Zen 3 IOD, which measures 124.9 mm2. Compared to Zen 3, the Zen 4 architecture is also said to be very efficient, offering 62% less power for the same performance and 49% more performance for the same power. 

According to AMD, the increases in IPC come from a new Front End & Load/Store + Branch Predictor, which should already account for about 80% of the improvements, while L2 cache structuring and execution engines should account for the remaining 20% of the improvements. In addition, AVX-512 and VNNI are said to be able to increase FP32 (multi-thread) performance by up to 30% and INT8 (multi-thread) CPU performance by 2.5 times. In addition to the larger caches, the micro-op cache has been increased from 4 KB to 6.75 KB and the L1I and L1D caches have been increased to 32 KB. The size of the L2 cache has also doubled to 1 MB and now also runs at 14 instead of 12 cycles, while the L3 cache has increased from 46 to 50 cycles. The L1 BTB was also increased from 1 KB to 1.5 KB.

AMD Ryzen 9 7950X

The AMD Ryzen 9 7950X tested today offers a count of 16 cores and 32 threads, which is retained from the previous two generations. The CPU has a base frequency of 4.5 GHz and a boost clock of up to 5.7 GHz (5.85 GHz F-Max) , which on paper should make it 200 MHz faster than Intel’s Alder Lake Core i9-12900KS, which offers a boost frequency of 5.5 GHz with an active core. One should have gone to the limits here and exhausted what is still somehow stably possible within the 170 W TDP (230 W PPT). As for the cache, the CPU has 80 MB, 64 MB of which comes from L3 (32 MB per CCD) and 16 MB from L2 (1 MB per core). The CPU consists of an IOD and two chiplets (CCD). The flagship will cost 849 Euros incl. VAT in Germany. (MSRP), which means it is priced above the Core i9-12900K but offers a significant performance boost in multi-threaded applications.

AMD Ryzen 7 7700X

The AMD Ryzen 7 7700X is an 8-core / 16-thread processor. AMD is effectively positioning this CPU as the sweet spot for gamers and as such, the CPU will have a base clock of 4.5 GHz and a boost clock of 5.4 GHz, but will come with a lower TDP of 105 W (142 W PPT). The CPU has a 40 MB cache pool, which consists of 32 MB L3 from the single CCD and 8 MB L2 from the Zen 4 cores. The special feature (also in terms of cooling) is that these smaller CPUs (as well as the Ryzen 5 7600X) only use one chiplet (CCD) next to the centrally placed IOD. The Ryzen 7 7700X will be available at a price of 479 Euros incl. VAT. and is supposed to compete with the Core i7-12700K at market launch.

 

261 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

SpielerZwei

Mitglied

17 Kommentare 2 Likes

Und los geht's ;)!

Antwort 2 Likes

ianann

Veteran

336 Kommentare 232 Likes

Merci x1000!
Seite Eins: "Dass ich heute mit dem Ryzen 9 5950X und dem Ryzen 7 7700X vorerst nur zwei CPUs im Testfeld habe" - das soll sicher 7950X heißen, oder?

Antwort Gefällt mir

M
Moeppel

Urgestein

873 Kommentare 312 Likes

Bisher sehen alle Reviews recht stark nach einer 5800X3D Show aus, wenn man nicht gerade Verwendung für einen 7950X hat bzw. ins Zeit ist Geld Segment fällt 😉

Werde wohl erst RDNA 3 und 4K Benchmarks abwarten, oder gar 7000er 3Ds, wenn nicht gänzlich aussetzen.

Antwort 3 Likes

Megaone

Urgestein

1,762 Kommentare 1,661 Likes

"Preis von 840 Euro inkl. MwSt. (UVP) zeugt von AMDs neuem Selbstbewusstsein."

Das zeigt eher das die Krankheit an der NVDIA leidet ansteckend ist, und womöglich zur Pandemie wird. :cool:

Leider ist keine Impfung in Sicht.

Was im übrigen auch wenig Hoffnung für andere kommende Produkte läst.

Antwort 2 Likes

G
GenFox

Mitglied

32 Kommentare 12 Likes

Eigentlich wollte ich meiner 2080Ti mal endlich ein Upgrade vom Ryzen 2600 auf Zen 4 gönnen.
Das scheint sich durch den neuen Sockel/Ram/CPU-Wasserblock wohl eher doch nicht zu lohnen, wo doch beim 5800X3D, bei ähnlicher Gaming-Leistung, der gesamte Unterbau (AM4/DDR4/CPU-Wasserblock) bestehen bleiben könnte.

Antwort 5 Likes

ianann

Veteran

336 Kommentare 232 Likes

Vielen Dank für die gewohnt hervorragende Durchführung und Bewertung des Testparcours! Insgesamt eine gute Leistung, wenn man sich allerdings zu Gemüte führt dass man für ein neues System eben nicht nur die CPU, sondern zusätzlich ein Board und neuen RAM benötigt, puh - sportlich - fragt man sich dann doch, ob es einem die Mehrperformance "wert" ist. Bin mal gespannt wo die AM5 Bretter am Ende preislich landen. Schade finde ich, dass bis auf die paar "Workstation/ Creator"-Boards immer mehr Military-blab-bling-gefahren wird, anstatt mal wieder ein schlicht anmutendes Mainboard anzubieten.

Antwort 4 Likes

konkretor

Veteran

306 Kommentare 313 Likes

sehr schön auch LTspiceXVII zu sehen.

Danke für den Test

Antwort Gefällt mir

HerrRossi

Urgestein

6,790 Kommentare 2,246 Likes

Danke für den Test! Für mich bedeutet das: viel Geld nicht ausgegeben.

Die Anwendungsleistung ist natürlich über alle Zweifel erhaben, aber da ich den 5590X nur sehr selten auslaste, reicht der mir noch ein Weilchen. In Gaming ist Zen 4 zwar auch schneller, aber da ich hier eher durch die Grafikkarte gebremst werde, muss ich auch dafür nicht unbedingt wechseln. Für Cities Skylines könnte ich zwar mehr Power brauchen, aber es geht auch so. Vllt. sollte ich dafür einfach mal den 5800X3D testen.

Bei Poisson und SRMP fehlen aber die neuen CPUs!?

Antwort 2 Likes

D
DavyB

Mitglied

52 Kommentare 34 Likes

Gehöre dann doch wohl eher zu jenen die sich deutlich mehr an Leistung erhofft haben. Im Teillast Bereich kaum schneller als das "Current Gen" Team Blau Sortiment und das bei doch etwas mehr Verbrauch, höherer Temperatur und höheren Anschaffungskosten. Über Workload will ich nicht urteilen, dass der mit der Kernanzahl nach oben hin skaliert dürfte klar sein. Zumal ich als niederer Programmierer (3tes Semester im Informatik Studium) noch nicht in die Situation gekommen bin dass ich eine derartige Kernanzahl wirklich sinnvoll brauchen/nutzen könnte. AMD ist zumindest im CPU Bereich auf Intel Preis Niveau angekommen. Hier macht es keinen Unterschied was man sich holt, teuer sind beide.

Bleibt zu hoffen dass das nicht auch bei den GPUs Schule macht (vor allem Stromverbrauch und Temperatur) sonst wird dort ausschließlich nach Feature Umfang gekauft (Vor allem hier muss AMD liefern). Bei den Preisen gehe ich davon aus dass auch dort auf Nvidia Niveau angehoben wird.

Antwort 2 Likes

G
Guest

Ganz schöne Ballermänner.
Naja. Nichts, was mich mit einem ohnehin massiv zuwenig genutzem 5900X vom Sofa hochholt.
Aber man muss zugeben, dass die neuen Teilchen doch ganz gut abgehen.
Kommt immer drauf an, von welcher Plattform man kommt und was man braucht. Die Abwärme- und Kühlproblematiken werden allerdings also weiterhin Foren über Foren füllen :D. Schon ganz schön heftig, was die beiden Hersteller da ab Werk an Auto-Overclocking par Excellence rausballern. Das ist echt einfach unglaublich. Overclocker vor 15-20 Jahren, ach was 10 Jahren waren wohl höchst selten so "mutig". Da wird rausgeballert, was geht.

Antwort 1 Like

mer

Veteran

228 Kommentare 127 Likes

Danke.
Ich wart auf den 7800X3D.
Und dann wart ich wahrscheinlich weiter auf den 8800X3D 9800X3D.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Lagavulin

Veteran

233 Kommentare 189 Likes

@Igor Wallossek
Vielen Dank für den fundierten, aussagekräftigen Test und die vielen technischen Infos!

Mich würde noch interessieren, welche Temperatur über stundenlangen Betrieb für einen 7950X noch „gesund“ ist. Du schreibst „Beim Gaming sollte man stets unter 90 °C bleiben können“. Beim 5950X gab es eine Aussage von AMD, dass 80 Grad auf Dauer kein Problem sind (ich weiß aber nicht, ob AMD mit 80 Grad sichergehen wollte, falls jemand 24/7 rendert).

Antwort Gefällt mir

S
Staarfury

Veteran

257 Kommentare 206 Likes

Der 7950 scheint im Workstation Bereich schwer zu toppen.

7700/7600 könnten es aber schwer haben, ihren Preis gegen die kommende 13er Generation zu rechtfertigen. Bleibt nur zu hoffen, dass sich Intel nicht noch die Watt-Brechstange verbiegt...

Antwort 1 Like

M
Moeppel

Urgestein

873 Kommentare 312 Likes

Laut anderen Outlets ist es von AMD beabsichtigt, dass die Teile auf ihre 95°C tJunction Temperatur kommen und damit das beste/höchste für sich rausholen. Das benennt AMD selbst auch ganz klar so. Zen 4 läuft in erster Linie in eine Temperaturwand, bevor irgendetwas anderes limitiert.

Wie man dazu steht, mag jeder für sich selbst entscheiden.

Ein der8auer Delidding zeigte bereits erhebliche Verbesserung in der Kühlung, was nicht heißt, dass ich diesen Weg empfehlen würde.

Kurzum: Die Teile werden heiß und es ist beabsichtigt, dass sie es werden und wurden um die Tatsache herum designed. So zumindest offizielle Verlautbarungen ;)

Antwort 1 Like

S
Staarfury

Veteran

257 Kommentare 206 Likes

Ist ja eigentlich nur der alte Preis des 5950 mit der neuen Wechselkursrealität.

Aber das neue Selbstverständnis von AMD hat sich ja schon vor 2 Jahren gezeigt, als man es nicht nötig hatte, eine Zen 3 CPU unter 300 Euro anzubieten.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Haru

Veteran

116 Kommentare 65 Likes

Bin ich hier gefühlt der einzige, der wirklich enttäuscht von Zen 4 ist?

Mit ach und krach kommt man an den 12900k ran, macht das Teil teurer und dank der Hitze deutlich unattraktiver?

Nee lass mal. Da bin ich ja mal auf Raptor Lake gespannt.

Antwort 3 Likes

ric84

Mitglied

63 Kommentare 30 Likes

Wie immer hat Igor und sein Team die meisten Balken im Angebot, danke für den ausführlichen Test :)

Ich werde mir wohl mal im Sale einen 5800x3D gönnen, der hält ja super mit, vor allem beim zocken.

Antwort 2 Likes

P
ParrotHH

Veteran

178 Kommentare 191 Likes

Na ja, ich gehe hier zunächst mal nur von einer Erstverschlimmerung aus... ;)
Das wird sich m. E. eher einrenken als die GPU-Preise, denn der Markt für Gamer ist ja nur eine Enthusiasten-Nische des PC-Marktes.

Erstaunlich finde ich den vergleichsweise kleinen Schritt, den eine jeweils neue Prozessorgeneration - im Vergleich zu GPUs - für den Benutzer bringt. Für 20 - 30% mehr Leistung lohnt es sich m. E. jedenfalls nicht, die "alte" Hardware zu entsorgen. Wer noch eine CPU aus der Generation Zen 2 im Gehäuse stecken hat, bekommt hier vielleicht wirklich einen echten Gegenwert, aber selbst dann kauft man vielleicht besser einen 5800X3D, und freut sich noch ein/zwei Jahre über eine - im Wortsinne - preiswerte Plattform, bevor man alles neu kauft.

Antwort Gefällt mir

HerrRossi

Urgestein

6,790 Kommentare 2,246 Likes

??? Der 7950X liegt doch 7% vor dem 12900K:

View image at the forums

Antwort 2 Likes

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung