Basics Cooling Practice Reviews Watercooling

The big radiator material test: How much copper and technology is in the Watercool Mo-Ra3 360 Pro? | Part 4

In today’s fourth part, I sacrifice my private Mo-Ra3 360 Pro from the lab in the service of science, simply because space was needed for something bigger. Yes, I admit that the working radiator, which unfortunately is no longer available to buy new, could certainly have been sold for a profit on kleinanzeigen.de. But firstly, I generally don’t do that kind of thing and secondly, curiosity was ultimately greater than the desire to maximize profits, because I have since received a lot of inquiries about this monster. Yes, it was a bit of a shame, but never mind. Cut up is cut up and you’ll find out where my curiosity came from in a moment.

At 6.5 kilos gross, the Mo-Ra3 360 Pro is more than just a brick, it is simply a challenge to arms, hands and the technology to be cooled. But that’s okay, it’s not about cooling today, it’s all about the inner workings. In other words, a kind of autopsy of a body that has been cut open. And it will also involve a special weldung process in which no conventional solder such as tin or lead is used. But more about that on the second page.

Technical details

Radiator size external
Radiator type Multipass
Radiator height (exact) 65 mm
Radiator width (exact) 383 mm
Radiator length (exact) 415.5 mm
Radiator height 50 – 59 mm
Radiator width over 200 mm
Radiator length 400 – 499 mm
Number of radiator connections 6x G1/4 inch
Radiator material Aluminum, copper
Fan compatibility 18x 120 mm, 8x 180 mm
Fan/radiator mounting M4 thread
Pressure tested 5 bar
Weight in g (exact) 6.500
Weight in g over 2500 g
Main color Black
Accent color Silver

Brass or copper?

Of course, brass should not be demonized in general and copper exclusively praised as salutary when it comes to purely thermal issues. A little zinc creates more stability and also allows for thinner-walled ducts if this alloy is deliberately used to reduce the wall thickness and thus also the thermal resistance. Then, assuming good engineering, you can even get just below the values of copper in thicker walls. If you want to. Companies such as Hardware Labs have been successfully trying to reduce the size of structures for years, while others simply use brass to reduce costs. So the devil is always in the detail and in which path a company ultimately decides to take.

But as I already wrote in the first part: everyday performance is not the subject of this series of articles, but the pure material analyses and the detection of prohibited substances. I would also ask those who use these articles in their media to really pay attention to the nuances and not just break the content down into a short form using their own words, which may be misleading. In the case of lead, this is really clear and must be criticized unreservedly; with brass, you always have to look at the overall concept.

You also have to bear in mind, if you are not looking at it with purely German eyes, the different meanings of copper and brass. Historically, in the English-speaking world, a distinction is actually only made between copper and aluminum radiators. Interestingly, the subtleties of the distinction between brass and copper are of no interest to anyone there, especially not to the marketing department. You have to keep this in mind when the respective PR department creates such websites and then translates them into German. But today we are talking about a German product and the sensitivities of the local target group.

Test equipment for material tests, accuracy and test preparation

My Keyence VHX 7000 and EA-300 are used for material testing and measuring the radiators, enabling both exact measurements and fairly precise mass determinations of the chemical elements. But how does it actually work? The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) I used for the article is a type of atomic emission spectroscopy in which a pulsed laser is directed at a sample in order to vaporize a small part of it and thus generate a plasma.

The emitted radiation from this plasma is then analyzed to determine the elemental composition of the sample. LIBS has many advantages over other analytical techniques. Since only a tiny amount of the sample is needed for analysis, the damage to the sample is minimal. The real damage is caused in today’s article by my rather coarse cutting and separating tools. This still quite new laser technique generally requires no special preparation of the samples for material analysis. Even solids, liquids and gases can be analyzed directly.

LIBS can detect multiple elements simultaneously in a sample and can be used for a variety of samples, including biological, metallic, mineral and other materials. And you get true real-time analysis, which saves a tremendous amount of time. As LIBS generally requires no consumables or hazardous reagents, it is also a relatively safe technique that does not require a vacuum as with SEM EDX. As with any analytical technique, there are of course certain limitations and challenges with LIBS, but in many of my applications, especially where speed, versatility and minimally invasive sampling are an advantage, it offers significant benefits.

Test sample for calibration

I would first like to point out that the results of the percentages in the overviews and tables were intentionally rounded to full percentages (wt%, i.e. percent by weight), as it happens often enough that production fluctuations can occur even within the presumably same material. Investigations in the parts-per-thousand range are nice, but today they are not useful when it comes to reliable evaluation and not trace elements. I therefore only deliberately searched for lead in the percentage range, although the RoHS even criticizes trace elements. I have provided more information on accuracy and methodology below as a link to a separate article.

However, every day in the lab starts with the same procedure, because when I start, I work through a checklist that I have drawn up. This takes up to 30 minutes each time, although I have to wait for the laser to warm up and the room to reach the right temperature anyway.

  • Mechanical calibration of the X/Y table and the camera alignment (e.g. for stitching)
  • White balance of the camera for all lighting fixtures used
  • Check alignment of LIBS optics and standard lens, calibrate alignment of laser to own optics (x300)
  • Test standard samples of the materials to be measured and correct the curve if necessary (see image above)

More articles from this series:

Watercool MO-RA3 420 LT schwarz (25100)

MindfactoryLagernd im Außenlager, Lieferung 2-3 WerktageStand: 18.07.24 04:32219,97 €*Stand: 18.07.24 04:34
Aquatuninglagernd: 5219,98 €*Stand: 18.07.24 04:35
galaxus4-6 Werktage239,11 €*Stand: 18.07.24 04:29
*Alle Preise inkl. gesetzl. MwSt zzgl. Versandkosten und ggf. Nachnahmegebühren, wenn nicht anders beschriebenmit freundlicher Unterstützung von geizhals.de

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,703 Kommentare 1,037 Likes

Obwohl mir der Radiator zumindest zur Zeit deutlich zu groß wäre, war die Analyse und der Hintergrund spannend zu lesen. Und ja, so ein Radiator, bei dem die Kupferrohre mittels Induktionsschweißen so sauber und ohne Lot verbunden sind, spielt auch fertigungstechnisch in einer ganz anderen Klasse als die Billigheimer die dann auch noch mit Bleilot verlötet sind. Wenn's mal tatsächlich unbedingt ein "high end" flüssiggekühltes System sein soll, ist sowas wie der Mo-Ra dann auch eine konsequente Wahl für den Radiator. Das der auch mit der Abwärme einer Top dGPU und einer CPU am Anschlag fertig werden kann, glaube ich gerne.

Antwort 1 Like

echolot

Urgestein

1,118 Kommentare 875 Likes

Sehr ausführliche Materialanalye. Scheint sein geld wert zu sein. Ich kann mir nicht vorstellen, dass es keinen deutschen Anbieter im Bereich des Induktionsschweißens auf diesem Gebiet geben soll. Osteuropäer machen das sicherlich auch. Und die Chinesen haben das für sich noch nicht entdeckt? Scheint ja eine recht ordentliche Methode zu sein um saubere Verbindungen herzustellen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

arcDaniel

Urgestein

1,665 Kommentare 924 Likes

Ich hatte einen und war sehr begeistert. Sollte ich allerdings wieder eine Wakü planen, würde ich sofort den 420iger nehmen, nimmt nicht viel mehr Platz weg man kommit mit 4*200mm Lüftern aus, welche sehr langsam (und somit unhörbar) drehen dürfen.

Antwort 2 Likes

Nulight

Veteran

250 Kommentare 170 Likes

Der MoRa 420 war meine beste Anschaffung.
Vier Noctua Lüfter samt Blende dazu und gut ist.
Die Weiße Edition macht sich wirklich gut und dank eines externen Standortes, mit der D5 und AGB am Radiator, ist das Büro schön leise.

Antwort 3 Likes

Ghoster52

Urgestein

1,460 Kommentare 1,123 Likes

Danke für den Test, aber es ist wirklich schade um den MoRa... 😢

Antwort 2 Likes

B
Besterino

Urgestein

6,910 Kommentare 3,477 Likes

Aua. Der gute Mora. :(

Aber für die Wissenschaft muss man (am besten: andere) ja Opfer bringen. ;)

Nun ist der 360 ja schon was älter - stellt sich die Frage, ob die Quali bei einem aktuellen 420er immer noch so gut ist? ;)

Antwort 3 Likes

c
cunhell

Urgestein

562 Kommentare 529 Likes

Klasse Test und trotzdem irgendwie schade um das tolle Stück Handwerkskunst ;-)
Die Frage, die sich mir aufdrängt ist, sind die jetzt erhältlichen Moras immer noch so toll gearbeitet oder
zehrt man mittlerweile von dem, zu recht, guten Ruf.
Anm.: Subjektiv habe ich so den Eindruck, dass einige Firmen ihren guten Ruf nutzen und stillschweigend an so mancher Ecke
an der Güte sparen wo es nicht auffällt. Was aber nicht heissen soll, dass es beim Mora so sein muss.

Cunhell

PS: Besterino hatte wohl zeitgleich den gleichen Gedanken ;-)

Antwort 2 Likes

N
NilsHG

Mitglied

89 Kommentare 53 Likes

Mein Hauptgrund für eine Wakü. Egal ob idle oder ob gerade 650W aus der Steckdose genuckelt werden. Der PC ist, auch mit Pumpe und Mora420 im gleichen Raum, immer gleich leise. Nur das Spulenfiepen ist wahrnehmbar 😅.

Das hoffe ich doch sehr!

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,489 Kommentare 19,661 Likes

Kannst ja ein Foto vom Lötpunkt schicken. Also von außen 😎

Antwort 3 Likes

m
modena.ch

Mitglied

86 Kommentare 36 Likes

Danke für die Untersuchung!

Hab ichs jetzt übersehen oder fehlt die Analyse der Kühlfinnen?
Im Titel sind sie ja erwähnt, aber nicht da....

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,489 Kommentare 19,661 Likes
m
modena.ch

Mitglied

86 Kommentare 36 Likes

Jetzt schon! :D

Besten Dank!

Antwort Gefällt mir

B
Besterino

Urgestein

6,910 Kommentare 3,477 Likes

@Igor Wallossek Hab gerade tatsächlich welche im Zulauf. Bevor ich die verbaue, könnte ich mal Sachen aufmachen. Geht das zerstörungsfrei?

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,489 Kommentare 19,661 Likes

Ja, man kann den POM Einlass abschrauben und abziehen. Siehe auch Teaserbild

Antwort 2 Likes

N
NilsHG

Mitglied

89 Kommentare 53 Likes

Dann überlasse ich das doch lieber @Besterino. Ich will meinen Mora nicht von der Wand nehmen und trocken legen ;)

Antwort 1 Like

B
Besterino

Urgestein

6,910 Kommentare 3,477 Likes

@Igor Wallossek: Danke!

@NilsHG: Dauert aber bis frühestens (!) Wochenende.

Antwort 1 Like

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,703 Kommentare 1,037 Likes

Was sind denn gute Indizien für brauchbare Qualität bei Radiatoren, die man auch begutachten kann, wenn man jetzt kein Labor dafür hat? Hast Du (@Igor Wallossek ) denn sowas wie eine Checkliste die Du selbst durchgehst? Ich meine das (vor allem) bevor man sowas einbaut. Testest Du Dichtheit usw, und wie? Vorher mit Wasser durchspülen, dann abfüllen und stehen lassen um Leckagen zu finden würde ich auch automatisch machen, aber was ist sonst gut und wichtig zu prüfen?
Große, offensichtliche Schäden (Risse, Dellen) die auch im Transport passieren können sind ja kein Problem, die grobe Inspektion macht man ja automatisch beim Auspacken.

Wenn es sowas bereits im Forum gibt, bitte gerne darauf hinweisen!

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,489 Kommentare 19,661 Likes

Fast alles sieht man nicht von außen, da bleiben nur qualifizierte Reviews (keine Influencer). Wenn man einen Blick fürs Coating hat, merkt man auch die Preisgruppe des OEM, aber das ist schon viel zu kleinteilig.

Was ich immer gern mache: Alle Anschlüsse verschließen und nur Ein- und Auslass offen lassen. Und dann lasse ich das Teil mittels Kompressor richtig durchpusten (am Auslass habe ich ein feines Sieb mit drübergezogenem Strumpfhosenfilter). Wenn da Gebrösel rauskommt, wurde geschlampt und meist auch nicht gut gespült. Flux-Reste bekommt man gut mit verdünnter Schwefelsäure raus, aber dann muss man hinterher spülen wie ein junger Gott... Und immer schön auf die Umwelt achten. Heißes Wasser mit Geschirrspültab geht übrigens auch (gut bei gebrauchten Radis), aber danach kommt auch wieder der junge Gott mit der Spülung...

Ergo: ich kaufe lieber die üblichen Unverdächtigen, da muss ich vorher nicht so rumfingern. Ich habe einen PC mit Aqua Computer und meinen Gaming Table mit Alphacool bestückt. Bei beiden sieht das DP Ultra auch nach 2 Jahren noch top aus. Liegt sicher auch am guten Schlauch :D

Antwort 1 Like

RedF

Urgestein

4,890 Kommentare 2,721 Likes

Bin ja echt Fan von den Watercool Industrial EPDM Schläuchen.

Antwort 2 Likes

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung