Basics Cooling Practice Reviews Watercooling

The big radiator material test: Between promise, reality and the forbidden – Water Cooling tested more in Detail! | Part 1

No, I’m not going to test the cooling performance of radiators for PC cooling today, but I am going to take a closer look at the first six manufacturers and their current models to see whether they really do contain exactly what the marketing advertises and the customer buys in good faith in some cases. In the first part, I obtained radiators from six well-known manufacturers from the retail trade, completely dismantled them and analyzed them in detail. The reasons for today’s test are no secret, as I am often contacted when it comes to clogged water cooling components or unexplained corrosion. Something like this triggers me just as much as my beloved 12VHPWR and ultimately provokes the necessary curiosity to go to such time and financial expense.

Today we start (in alphabetical order) with frequently purchased products from Alphacool, Aqua Computer, Bykski, EK Water Blocks, Hardware Labs and Watercool, whereby I have already purchased further products anonymously from Amazon and others for a follow-up. In addition to Corsair and the new radiators from Thermaltake, there will also be typical Chinese products for a small price, where often enough a single OEM is behind many brands, so that I can even test these parts as examples. Regardless of whether these products are sold as Magicool at Caseking or Richer-R, Diyeeni or Tonysa at Amazon, AliExpress & Co, it’s always the same manufacturer, only the packaging and prices change from 8 to 30 euros. But that will come in the next parts.

Normally you have to believe what the supplier sells you and what their marketing advertises. And so today it’s not just about the details, but also the credibility of the specifications, whereby I can already spoil the fact that I didn’t just catch one manufacturer lying and another even wrote more in the specs than all the others. I also adapted part of the RoHS test by looking for lead in the solder. There will also be something to write about this, because unfortunately I found what I was looking for.

Manufacturer Model (size)
Alphacool NexXxoS ST30 Full Copper X-Flow 120mm
Aqua Computer airplex radical 2/120, aluminum fins
Bykski CR-RD120RC-TN-V2, 120mm Radiator D30 V2 Full Copper
EKWB Quantum Surface P120M – Black
Hardware Labs Black Ice Nemesis GTS – 120 XFlow
Watercool HEATKILLER RAD 120-S Black

For reasons of handiness and also sustainability, because I have to separate the radiators and thus render them unusable, I test the smallest models that can be obtained quickly, i.e. the 120 models. This is not a problem, because it is not the length that is decisive, but the material itself. After all, today it’s not about the cooling capacity, but the components. I’m going to do this and other tests because no one has ever done it in this depth and published it. And perhaps it will also answer a few questions on its own as to why some things work differently than planned and hoped for in your own PC practice during continuous operation.

Test equipment for the material tests

The material testing and measurement of the radiators is carried out by my Keyence VHX 7000 with EA-300, which has now been fully upgraded and enables both precise measurements and quite accurate mass determinations of the chemical elements. But how does it actually work? The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) I used for this article is a type of atomic emission spectroscopy in which a pulsed laser is directed at a sample in order to vaporize a small part of it and thus generate a plasma.

The emitted radiation from this plasma is then analyzed to determine the elemental composition of the sample. LIBS has many advantages over other analytical techniques. Since only a tiny amount of the sample is needed for analysis, the damage to the sample is minimal. The real damage is caused in today’s article by my rather coarse cutting and separating tools. This still quite new laser technique generally requires no special preparation of the samples for material analysis. Even solids, liquids and gases can be analyzed directly.

LIBS can detect multiple elements simultaneously in a sample and can be used for a variety of samples, including biological, metallic, mineral and other materials. And you get true real-time analysis, which is a huge time saver. As LIBS generally requires no consumables or hazardous reagents, it is also a relatively safe technique that does not require a vacuum as with SEM EDX. As with any analytical technique, there are of course certain limitations and challenges with LIBS, but in many of my applications, especially where speed, versatility and minimally invasive sampling are an advantage, it offers distinct advantages.

Foreword on accuracy and proportions

I would first like to point out that the results of the percentages in the overviews and tables have been intentionally rounded to full percentages, as it happens often enough that production variations can occur even within the presumably same material. Investigations in the parts-per-thousand range are nice, but today they are not useful when it comes to reliable evaluation and not trace elements. I therefore only deliberately searched for lead in the percentage range, although the RoHS states that it may be less than 500 mg per kilogram of solder. However, I am not the testing institute and will only denounce those who really deliberately use lead and not those whose products only contain minimal traces of impurities. Although this is also unpleasant, it completely misses the point. Anything above one percent is no longer a coincidence, but really intentional. And I will find that.

Furthermore, it is certainly debatable whether the percentage of an element in the sample is better expressed in at% or wt%, because it is almost negligible for our self-imposed accuracy range. For example, to illustrate the difference between zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) in terms of weight percent (wt%) and atomic percent (at%), let us consider a hypothetical example in which an alloy (brass) consists of zinc and copper.

The atomic weight of copper (Cu) is about 63.546 u and that of zinc (Zn) is about 65.38 u. For ease of comparison, let’s take brass that consists of equal parts zinc and copper in terms of atomic number, so 50 at% Zn and 50 at% Cu (which is how I usually measure, since I’m not a metallurgist). To calculate the difference between at% and wt% for Zn and Cu, you determine the molar mass of the alloy and take the average atomic mass of both elements as the basis for the calculation. The weight percentage (wt%) of copper (Cu) is about 49.29% and that of zinc (Zn) about 50.71%.

Despite the assumption of equal atomic percentages (50 at% for both elements), the different atomic weights of zinc and copper lead to a slight difference in the weight percentages. Zinc, which has a slightly higher atomic weight than copper, takes up a slightly larger proportion of the total weight of the alloy (50.71% wt% compared to 49.29% wt% for copper). This example illustrates how at% and wt% can reflect different aspects of an alloy’s composition. Although the atomic percentages are the same, the different atomic weights result in different weight percentages. These differences are important to understand as they can affect the physical properties and processing of the alloy.

interestingly, some manufacturers refer to the atomic weight, while others use the weight percentages as a benchmark, but without making specific reference to them. However, as I deliberately do not compare absolute masses, this can almost be neglected in the case of copper and zinc. The difference between at% and wt% in the EA-300 result overviews for these two elements is always in the decimal range, so that I always use at% in the images (with a few exceptions where I wanted to calculate further). The proportional atomic weight at% is therefore completely sufficient and meaningful enough for a ratio, but the metallurgical weight ratio is still listed in the comparison tables. So please do not be confused if the figures in the graph and table differ in nuances! Normally you would also write 99.9% copper, because you always have to allow for tolerances, but by rounding up I simply use 100%, which is less confusing.

But it can also be much larger and coarser when it comes to dividing up more trivial things. This includes the tools for cutting and exposing the assemblies, from a Dremel to a pendulum action saw to a large chop saw for the very long cuts right through the radiators. I’d better spare you the details of these pictures from the workshop, because it really was a fine shaft festival. Where there is sawing and cutting, there are chips and in the case of the radiator from Aqua Computer with the polyacetal (Delrin) it was a real mess, but all in good time. Nevertheless, it was worth it, I can spoil that in advance. And I also had to clean up afterwards.

The big Radiator Material Test: Even more lead, a popular hiding place and 2.5 bright spots | Part 2

Alphacool NexXxoS ST30 Full Copper X-Flow 120mm (14228)

MindfactoryZentrallager: verfügbar, Lieferung 3-5 WerktageFiliale Wilhelmshaven: nicht lagerndStand: 21.04.24 16:5739,57 €*Stand: 21.04.24 16:58
Aquatuninglagernd: 25+39,58 €*Stand: 21.04.24 16:47
AlphacoolAuf Lager39,98 €*Stand: 21.04.24 17:01
*Alle Preise inkl. gesetzl. MwSt zzgl. Versandkosten und ggf. Nachnahmegebühren, wenn nicht anders beschriebenmit freundlicher Unterstützung von geizhals.de

Aqua Computer airplex radical 2/120, Aluminium-Lamellen (33701)

MindfactoryZentrallager: verfügbar, Lieferung 3-5 WerktageFiliale Wilhelmshaven: nicht lagerndStand: 21.04.24 16:5769,45 €*Stand: 21.04.24 16:58
Aquatuninglagernd: 169,46 €*Stand: 21.04.24 16:47
Caseking.deLagernd79,90 €*Stand: 21.04.24 16:59
*Alle Preise inkl. gesetzl. MwSt zzgl. Versandkosten und ggf. Nachnahmegebühren, wenn nicht anders beschriebenmit freundlicher Unterstützung von geizhals.de

Bykski RC Series Thin Radiator 120 (CR-RD120RC-TN-V2)

EK Water Blocks Quantum Line EK-Quantum Surface P P120M Black (3831109838334)

galaxus4-6 Werktage60,70 €*Stand: 21.04.24 17:00
Caseking.deLagernd62,90 €*Stand: 21.04.24 16:59
AlternateNicht lagernd, ab Bestellung versandfertig in 9 Tagen62,90 €*Stand: 21.04.24 16:52
*Alle Preise inkl. gesetzl. MwSt zzgl. Versandkosten und ggf. Nachnahmegebühren, wenn nicht anders beschriebenmit freundlicher Unterstützung von geizhals.de

Hardware Labs Black Ice GT Stealth 120 XFlow

Watercool Heatkiller RAD 120-S Black (24100)

Caseking.deLagernd49,90 €*Stand: 21.04.24 16:59
galaxusLager Lieferant: Sofort lieferbar, 2-4 Werktage57,63 €*Stand: 21.04.24 17:00
GoConnlagernd60,17 €*Stand: 21.04.24 14:20
*Alle Preise inkl. gesetzl. MwSt zzgl. Versandkosten und ggf. Nachnahmegebühren, wenn nicht anders beschriebenmit freundlicher Unterstützung von geizhals.de

 

 

409 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

FritzHunter01

Moderator

1,154 Kommentare 1,568 Likes

Interessante Fundstücke. Das hier sogar Blei im Spiel ist…

EKWB —> Premium Preis? Da hätte ich mehr erwartet!

so ich bin dann mal wieder mit Lasern und Robotern spielen.

Dank an Igor für die Mühe und schon hat sich das teure Gerät gelohnt!

Antwort 5 Likes

big-maec

Urgestein

827 Kommentare 475 Likes

Das mit den Lötmittelresten und Oxidschichten erklärt mir bei meinen 2 EKWB Quantum Radiatoren, dass einmal normales Spülen nicht unbedingt reicht.

Antwort 1 Like

echolot

Urgestein

926 Kommentare 722 Likes

Spannende Materialtests. Muss man schon attestieren. Erst einmal Dank dafür. Alphacool und Aquacomputer habe ich schon vorne gesehen. Bei EKWB hätte ich mehr erwartet und Watercool sollte das schnellstmöglich in Ordnung bringen. Die sind nämlich preislich nachwievor sehr attraktiv. Bei Bykski habe ich das Ergebnis befürchtet. No Risk no fun. Von den dreien "Richer-R, Diyeeni bzw. Tonysa" habe ich noch nie etwas gehört. Bin gespannt. Konkurrenz belebt bekanntlich das Geschäft.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,184 Kommentare 18,774 Likes

Die verkauft Caseking als Magicool für relativ viel Geld. Dolly-Feeling :D

Antwort 6 Likes

Hagal77

Veteran

131 Kommentare 86 Likes

Meine ganzes DiY besteht aus Alphacool Radiatoren ST030/2x360+1x120mm habe ich also alles richtig gemacht, schön dass der Hersteller hier genau das Verkauft was man haben möchte und zwar Vollkupfer. Spasibo igorovic <3 !

Antwort 5 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,184 Kommentare 18,774 Likes

Das große Schlachten geht weiter, der Zulauf läuft schon zu...
Und das nächste Mal zerteile ich die Dinger draußen auf dem Hof.

Antwort 7 Likes

DigitalBlizzard

Urgestein

1,967 Kommentare 856 Likes

Schockiert mich ein wenig, das sind ja 50% Maultaschen, oder wie sie im schwäbischen heißen, "Herrgottsbscheißerle".
Von außen alles im Lack, aber unter dem äußeren Schein findet man dann Dinge, die nicht sein sollten oder dürften.
Mal abgesehen davon daß der Aqua Computer und der Byski nahezu identische Marktpreise haben, der airplex aber tatsächlich tolles Materialien und überragende Qualität liefert, der Byski nichts als Mogelpackung liefert.
Nicht wirklich überrascht hat mich der AlphaCool X-Flow, den ich sehr häufig verwende weil ich einfach bei der Konzeption gegenüberliegende Anschlüsse für einen Kreislauf besser finde, als nebeneinander liegende, was auch die Verrohrung sehr viel angenehmer macht. Kenne den nur als wirklich sehr guten Radi mit guter Wirksamkeit und extrem guten Preis-Leistungsverhältnis.
Für den günstigen Preis keinen Beschiss und ein solides Radiatörchen.
Ich werde den Airplex jetzt definitiv mit in mein Repertoire aufnehmen, da wo es auch optische Relevanz gibt bei Systemen mit Modding Ambitionen und nicht nur die reine Kühlung im Vordergrund steht.
Und ein wenig froh macht mich, das gerade der Xflow, den ich ja auch hier oft für Custom Waküs empfohlen habe, tatsächlich in jeglicher Hinsicht eine Empfehlung ist. Für mich das Maß der Dinge in Preisleistung und da wo man evtl. mehrere Radis im Kreislaufs braucht oder einfach weniger Rohr oder Schlauch nutzen will, sind die X-Flow mit dem gegenüberliegenden Anschlüssen nach wie vor meine erste Wahl.
Danke @Igor Wallossek für den tiefen Einblick, mal wieder, Du bist mein persönlicher lieblings " Hardware-Gynäkologe" und lässt uns Dinge sehen, die man normalerweise in freier Wildbahn nicht zu Gesicht bekäme.

Antwort 8 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
DigitalBlizzard

Urgestein

1,967 Kommentare 856 Likes

Hast keine Säge mit Absaugung !?🧐 Das gute Material, auffangen fein mahlen und der wärmeleitpaste beimischen, schöne Kupferspähne oder Weihnachten statt Lametta auf den Baum streuen.🥴

Antwort Gefällt mir

echolot

Urgestein

926 Kommentare 722 Likes

Achso. Da läuft der Hase. Ist ja wie bei der Prinzenrolle...wegduck

Antwort 3 Likes

Opa-Chris

Mitglied

84 Kommentare 120 Likes

Wie immer: Danke @Igor Wallossek für diesen tollen Test!

Genau dafür ist diese Seite einfach super, da gibt es Tests, die sonst keiner macht, aber uns sooo viel bringen!
Ich bin echt von Watercool überrascht, da ich deren Produkte bisher als sehr hochwertig wahrgenommen habe.

Ich werde dann wohl beim nächsten Mal aquacomputer in meine engere Auswahl einschließen. Aktuell bin ich mit meinen 3 Alphacool-Radiatoren sehr zufrieden.

Antwort 3 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,184 Kommentare 18,774 Likes

Das lohnt sich für die paar Schnitte platztechnisch nicht. Ja, ich habe noch eine große Werkbank in einer ehemaligen Garage, da gibt es sogr ein Absaugrohr - aber der Raum hat an der Decke einen Gasheizer und der kostet echt ein Vermögen. Mir ist es dort aktuell einfach zu kalt :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

DigitalBlizzard

Urgestein

1,967 Kommentare 856 Likes

Ich mag ja den Airplex Radical Copper sehr, rein von der Optik mit den Kupferlamellen, habe gerade ein Projekt mit einem Silver-CopperBuild mit einem

Und einem

Kabel werden kupferfarben gesleeved, und die Verrohrung wird aus Kupferrohren poliert und klar lackiert gemacht, dazu hatte ich zwei von denen

ins Auge gefasst, die ich jetzt auch beruhigt nehme.
Und als Pumpe mit Behälter das hier

Die vorhandene 3090 von Asus wollte ich hiermit versehen.

Mal sehen ob ich die dicken Radis reinbekomme oder doch nur die dünneren und welche Lüfter mit durchsichtigen Blades ich bekomme die taugen und bei weißem RGB das Kupfer aus den Radis durchscheinen lasse.

Hätte die genommen

Antwort 1 Like

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Megaone

Urgestein

1,745 Kommentare 1,644 Likes

Ist doch immer das gleiche und liegt im Wesen des Kapitalismus. Wenn man könnte, würde man sogar Wasser verdünnen. Und das Wort Premium bedeutet doch nur: "Jetzt mach ich mir die Taschen aber mal so richtig voll." Auch der Kauf beim Feinkostmetzger schützt einen nicht immer vor Gammelfleich. Und wenn Coca Cola das eine Prozent an Zitronen und - Limettensaft in der Sprite durch billige Weinsäure ersetzt und irgend Marketingfuzzi dies als Geschmacksrevolution anpreist, weißt du doch, wo du hier gelandet bist.

Ich kaufe seit Jahren nur noch Wakükram von Alphacool und Aquacomputer. Die sind zwar teuer, aber die Sachen sind Ok und ich kann die anrufen und sie helfen mir bei Fragen immer freundlich weiter.

Das ist auch was Wert.

Antwort 7 Likes

DigitalBlizzard

Urgestein

1,967 Kommentare 856 Likes

Zu kalt gibt's nicht, nur falsche Klamotten 😉
Du bist doch nun wahrlich kein Heizungskind, da muss man entweder durch, oder einfach diese Tests im Sommer machen 😜
Außen ein Schild ran, aus Messing, Hardware-Praxis Dr. Wallossek, Anamnesen aller Art, gerne auch schmerzhaft und schonungslos ! 😁

Antwort Gefällt mir

RedF

Urgestein

4,657 Kommentare 2,550 Likes

EKWB wundert mich nicht, seit Jahren nur blendwerk.
Aber von Watercool hätte ich mehr erwartet.

Antwort 3 Likes

a
aclogic

Veteran

118 Kommentare 51 Likes

Gegen zu kalt gibt es da ein einfaches Mittel: benutze eine normale Säge und Dir wird garantiert warm. 😜

Antwort 2 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,184 Kommentare 18,774 Likes

Ich habe sogar im russischen Winter überlebt, aber klamme Hände sind nichts zum genauen Arbeiten. Muss ich mir nicht mehr geben :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

Jean Luc Bizarre

Veteran

205 Kommentare 133 Likes

@Igor Wallossek Kleiner Fehler in den Material-Tabellen. Wenn das Lötzinn tatsächlich aus ZINN sein sollte, dann sollte als Elementenname 'Sn' und nicht 'Zn' stehen.
Ansonsten, cooler Artikel. Spannend was man so alles findet.

Antwort 2 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,184 Kommentare 18,774 Likes

Die ersten waren noch richtig - mal wieder im Stress untergegangen :D
Gefixt, Danke :)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung