Basics Cooling Reviews Watercooling

One lead-free please! Raijintek Calore C360D analyzed in the lab and found to be good

In what is now the fifth part, I analyze the Raijintek Calore C360D, a radiator from the community that was kindly made available to me for the final pathological examination. The parts are inexpensive and unfortunately it is not known exactly which OEM is behind it. Magiccol, as it used to be, is not. And so my curiosity increases, because price is not everything. The giant radiator with a thickness of 65 mm, which was last offered for around 150 euros, is also a real challenge for my cutting tool.

At 1.635 kilos gross, the Calore C360D is more than just a brick; the part is almost a challenge for arms, hands and the technology to be cooled. But that’s okay, it’s not about cooling today, it’s all about the inner workings. In other words, a kind of autopsy of a body that has been cut open. Pathology, I’ve already written about that. Here are the data first…

Technical details

Product Name CALORE C360D
Product Number 0R400056 [0R40A00056]
Dimension [W×D×H] 403.5×119×65.5 mm
Flat Tube 14 set ; 360×13×2mm
FPI (Fin per inch) 14
Tube row 3
Screw Threads G 1/4″
Port 5
Material Brass and copper
Weight 1653 g
Surface Black coated

Brass or copper?

Of course, brass should not be demonized in general and copper exclusively praised as salutary when it comes to purely thermal issues. A little zinc creates more stability and also allows for thinner-walled ducts if this alloy is deliberately used to reduce the wall thickness and thus also the thermal resistance. Then, assuming good engineering, you can even get just below the values of copper in thicker walls. If you want to. Companies such as Hardware Labs have been successfully trying to reduce the size of structures for years, while others simply use brass to reduce costs. So the devil is always in the detail and in which path a company ultimately decides to take.

But as I already wrote in the first part: everyday performance is not the subject of this series of articles, but the pure material analyses and the detection of prohibited substances. I would also ask those who use these articles in their media to really pay attention to the nuances and not just break the content down into a short form using their own words, which may be misleading. In the case of lead, this is really clear and must be criticized unreservedly; with brass, you always have to see the overall concept.

You also have to bear in mind, if you are not looking at it with purely German eyes, the different meanings of copper and brass. Historically, in the English-speaking world, a distinction is actually only made between copper and aluminum radiators. Interestingly, the subtleties of the distinction between brass and copper are of no interest to anyone there, especially not to the marketing department. You have to keep this in mind when the respective PR department creates such websites and then translates them into German. But today we are talking about a German product and the sensitivities of the local target group.

Test equipment for material tests, accuracy and test preparation

My Keyence VHX 7000 and EA-300 are used for material testing and measuring the radiators, enabling both exact measurements and fairly precise mass determinations of the chemical elements. But how does it actually work? The laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) I used for the article is a type of atomic emission spectroscopy in which a pulsed laser is directed at a sample in order to vaporize a small part of it and thus generate a plasma.

The emitted radiation from this plasma is then analyzed to determine the elemental composition of the sample. LIBS has many advantages over other analytical techniques. Since only a tiny amount of the sample is needed for analysis, the damage to the sample is minimal. The real damage is caused in today’s article by my rather coarse cutting and separating tools. This still quite new laser technique generally requires no special preparation of the samples for material analysis. Even solids, liquids and gases can be analyzed directly.

LIBS can detect multiple elements simultaneously in a sample and can be used for a variety of samples, including biological, metallic, mineral and other materials. And you get true real-time analysis, which saves a tremendous amount of time. As LIBS generally requires no consumables or hazardous reagents, it is also a relatively safe technique that does not require a vacuum as with SEM EDX. As with any analytical technique, there are of course certain limitations and challenges with LIBS, but in many of my applications, especially where speed, versatility and minimally invasive sampling are an advantage, it offers significant benefits.

Test sample for calibration

I would first like to point out that the results of the percentages in the overviews and tables were intentionally rounded to full percentages (wt%, i.e. percent by weight), as it happens often enough that production fluctuations can occur even within the presumably same material. Investigations in the parts-per-thousand range are nice, but today they are not useful when it comes to reliable evaluation and not trace elements. I therefore only deliberately searched for lead in the percentage range, although the RoHS even criticizes trace elements. I have provided more information on accuracy and methodology below as a link to a separate article.

However, every day in the lab starts with the same procedure, because when I start, I work through a checklist that I have drawn up. This takes up to 30 minutes each time, although I have to wait for the laser to warm up and the room to reach the right temperature anyway.

  • Mechanical calibration of the X/Y table and the camera alignment (e.g. for stitching)
  • White balance of the camera for all lighting fixtures used
  • Check alignment of LIBS optics and standard lens, calibrate alignment of laser to own optics (x300)
  • Test standard samples of the materials to be measured and correct the curve if necessary (see image above)

More articles from this series:

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

echolot

Urgestein

1,120 Kommentare 880 Likes

Das mit dem Messing anstatt Kupfer scheint die Regel zu sein und bleifrei ist auch keine Selbstverständlichkeit, obwohl es so sein müsste. Thx für die Analyse. Immer wieder gut am Montagmorgen in die Realität zurüchgeworfen zu werden.

Antwort 2 Likes

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,716 Kommentare 1,051 Likes

Also, Bleifrei, und möglicherweise sogar Super Bleifrei😁. Und schön, daß der OEM hier sich an die Schadstoffverordnung gehalten hat und die giftigen Schwermetalle hier keine Verwendung fanden.

Antwort 2 Likes

S
SpotNic

Urgestein

1,097 Kommentare 467 Likes

Ich finde es gut, dass du die Falztechnik entsprechend aufgegriffen und erläutert hast. Das war in den älteren Beiträgen doch etwas Vorurteilbehaftet. Danke!

Antwort 4 Likes

m
mojomojo

Neuling

6 Kommentare 7 Likes

Interessant, das es selbst OEM Fertiger komplett hinbekommen, das hätte ich im Vorfeld nicht gedacht, wo ja heutzutage wo jeder Cent zählt und jeder Zuliefere spart wo er kann.

Auf der Webseite steht:

Antwort 2 Likes

RedF

Urgestein

4,905 Kommentare 2,728 Likes

Genau, sowas ist immer interessant.
Vor allem wenn man wie ich nicht vom Fach ist.

Antwort Gefällt mir

arcDaniel

Urgestein

1,665 Kommentare 926 Likes

Wo ist eigentlich Blei alles verboten? In unseren Fachschulen wird noch bedenkenlos bleihaltiges 60/40 Lot benutzt und so wie ich das Mitbekomme, wird sich dies auch nicht in absehbarer Zeit ändern.

Antwort Gefällt mir

echolot

Urgestein

1,120 Kommentare 880 Likes

Da wirst Du fündig und unter Ausnahmen steht dann das

View image at the forums

Antwort Gefällt mir

Martin Gut

Urgestein

7,969 Kommentare 3,720 Likes

Mit "hochschmelzendem Bleilot mit über 85% Blei" ist nicht das herkömmliche 60/40-Elektronikerlot gemeint, sondern Lot das erst bei 270 bis 310 Grad schmilzt. Was damit gelötet wird, weiss ich nicht. Es hat aber sonst noch ein paar Ausnahmen die Bleilot für gewisse Anwendungen erlauben.

Antwort Gefällt mir

echolot

Urgestein

1,120 Kommentare 880 Likes

Magst recht haben. Da könne sich die Lötspezialisten mal melden. Die Tabelle ist recht lang und hab keine Böcke.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,519 Kommentare 19,722 Likes

Fragt mal den Dachdecker und Feinblechner. Die RoHS betrifft eigentlich auch nur alles, was indirekt oder direkt einen Stecker hat. Bei PCs ist das ja der Fall. :)

Antwort 1 Like

arcDaniel

Urgestein

1,665 Kommentare 926 Likes

Also, ich spreche von Löten im Elektrobereich und da lese ich keine Ausnahme. Komischerweise bekommt man bei uns (Luxemburg) auch noch 60/40 Lötzinn zu kaufen. Im deutschen Online Handel unfindbar.

Antwort 2 Likes

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,716 Kommentare 1,051 Likes

Wobei die Angabe "brass" dann ja auch das Messing korrekt angibt, also nicht einfach "copper" schreibt. Bleibt zu hoffen, daß derartig korrekte Fertigung und Beschreibung dann auch von Kunden mit Aufträgen belohnt wird. Denn das beste Argument für Firmen, es so zu machen, ist, wenn es gut für's Geschäft ist.

Antwort 2 Likes

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,716 Kommentare 1,051 Likes

Im Elektrobereich wird man auch selten bis nie Hartlöten, weil die meisten Bauteile die damit verbundene Hitze gar nicht mögen.
Das Luxemburg hier 60/40 Zinn noch zulässt, ist schon merkwürdig. Vielleicht warten die auf eine Europaweite Regelung? Wobei ich dachte, die gibt es schon. Vielleicht kann das @Igor Wallossek klarstellen.

Antwort 1 Like

LëMurrrmel

Veteran

184 Kommentare 144 Likes

Hä? Bleihaltiges Lötzinn gibt's doch noch uneingeschränkt zu kaufen. Für Reparaturen werde ich das auch weiterhin verwenden.

Antwort Gefällt mir

RedF

Urgestein

4,905 Kommentare 2,728 Likes

Als ich, welches kaufen wollte, gabs das nur mit Gewerbeschein.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Fladder72

Mitglied

14 Kommentare 2 Likes

Ich müsste mich mal damit befassen was man heutzutage als Ersatz für Arsen in Messing zulegiert, um die Entzinkungsbeständigkeit zu erhöhen. War eine Zeit lang im NE-Metall-Rohrzug in der QS tätig, da hatten wir nen Kunden in England, der Kühler für Oldtimer produzierte. Da kam immer Messing mit Arsen zum Einsatz. Ist halt schon ein Weilchen her.

Antwort Gefällt mir

D
Deridex

Urgestein

2,226 Kommentare 859 Likes

Man sollte bei dem ganzen Zeug nicht vergessen, dass es nicht nur RoHS, sondern auch REACH gibt. Ab da wird es aus meiner Sicht unübersichtlich.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,519 Kommentare 19,722 Likes

REACH... Das musste ich mal ein Dokument für eine winzige Portion Wärmeleitpaste ausfüllen :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung