Audio Headphones Headsets Practice Reviews Sound Systems Soundcards

Disadvantages of onboard sound – Influence of graphics card, headphone sensitivity and motherboard layout | Update 2022

Disclaimer: The following article is machine translated from the original German, and has not been edited or checked for errors. Thank you for understanding!

There is a newer version of this article! Please continue reading here:

Onboard sound disadvantages, problems, workarounds, external and internal solutions, headphone guide and basics

Old review:

To my dismay, motherboard manufacturers have done little since the first release in 2018 to eliminate or at least alleviate the serious drawbacks of a sound solution that is often installed very close to the graphics cards. On the contrary, the current layouts rarely keep up with the ever-increasing load peaks of current graphics cards and their “interference” on the overall system. Regardless of whether it’s the radiation of high-frequency waves or the influence via the power supply, it still chirps to the gods under load. In the meantime, I have published some more basics on the topic of onboard sound, including data sheets and more detailed explanations. I will now summarize all this for you again today, embed it and make it a bit clearer.

Why this article?

However, I would like to explain in detail in this analysis why I consider the onboard sound on many motherboards to be bad or at least not optimal. The usual tests (and marketing) usually only focus on the DAC and the codecs, but smoothly miss the actual problem. What do good headphones, a potent graphics card, a mid-priced motherboard, an oscilloscope, a very good multimeter and a set of trained ears have to do with each other? Let’s find out!

And one more thing before I start. The MSI Z370 Gaming Pro Carbon motherboard used here is not even bad, rather the opposite. It is one of the better ones and is in the VGA testing system for 2018/2019. There are even more extreme motherboards, up to the extra-nasty audio complete deniers, mostly from the 100 euro shelf (and below). But if even such a motherboard, like the one used for this test, can’t really convince, then how cruel must the reality of the cheapies be?

Sure, there are motherboards e.g. with an ESS SABRE 9218 that is supposed to deliver 2 Vrms at the headphone output (e.g. on an Aorus X299 Master), but these are unfortunately real exceptions. But as already mentioned, the levels alone are unfortunately not everything. And also ESS unfortunately does not write at which impedance the 2 Vrms will be applied. But I will definitely find out in the next test, because an “up to” is spongier than Sponge Bob after 2 hours in the dishwasher.

What this article offers and what questions it answers is quickly summarized:

  • Analysis of the maximum possible output level (“volume”)
  • Why not every pair of headphones sounds or is as loud as you’d like it to be
  • Where the annoying noise comes from (also on the desktop) e.g. when scrolling
  • Why powerful graphics cards can also strongly distort the sound image under load in gaming
  • How to break this knot
  • Overview of some of the sound solutions used including data sheets

What this article cannot and will not provide:

  • Voodoo about expensive DACs and Japanese noble capacitors
  • Advertising overpriced sound solutions and gold cables
  • Professorial technobabble from the ivory tower of the audiophile substitute religion

Yes, there are a lot of good reviews about the onboard sound and even blind tests that (want to) prove that it doesn’t always have to be the overpriced sound solution that seems necessary for daily happiness or is at least mantra-like propagated as such. However, almost all tests generally get it wrong: you play music without processor and graphics card load and assess a state that will never occur in gaming, for example.

Also, no one is likely to scroll back and forth, up and down on the screen during smooth classical music playback in such a test. This is rather impractical and only proves that the DACs (digital-to-analog converter) of current motherboards are better than their reputation. The problem, however, is that the digital part has not been a weak point for a long time, but that the analog branch including all signal paths on the motherboard is the real bottleneck.

Apart from the fact that the effective voltage (Vrms, I’ll explain in a moment) is much too low for a clean headphone input and output on almost all motherboards, the “interferences” (transients) caused by a potent graphics hardware are a real weak point, because the EMC tests and the issued CE certificates concern the GHz range, but not what ends up in our ears as mixed frequency garbage. Often enough, you can still hear what you see, unfortunately.

Without getting too technical now: at the non-linearities of many an amplifier unit, mixed products of various signals, direct and indirect, arise, because every unshielded, metallic surface simultaneously acts like a small antenna. There is rectification and intermodulation until the doctor comes. Don’t you think? This can be measured and proven. Even in places where untrained ears cannot or do not want to perceive anything at first.

In addition, you run (often without knowing it) your headphones on the audio output of your motherboard far below value! I have therefore included an extra chapter that deals specifically with this. Because full scale, overdrive, distortions (“distortion”) or the still (subjectively) cleanly achievable maximum level as acoustic added value are a really gloomy onboard chapter in itself. And often enough, either headphones are labeled as cucumbers, although actually only the motherboard doesn’t play along, or their “bad and unclean” sound is criticized, just because distortions that start much too early have a negative impact on the sound image. Mr. and Mrs. Gamer like it loud, but this is exactly where almost all onboard solutions fail grandiosely. The beauty of it is that this can also be easily measured and proven.

 

Measurement setup and tests

Since we have to focus on two topics that are completely independent of each other in terms of content, I am also dividing this article into individual topics, which are then in turn based on various individual measurements and analyses. In detail, this is how it will work:

  • Measurement of the maximum achievable output voltages at 32 and 500 ohms (Vrms) for volume and headphone evaluation
  • Measurement of interference voltages at different graphic loads and output impedances
  • Detailed analysis of the interference voltages with different graphics cards
  • Comparison of analog and digital outputs for separate sound solutions

I generally measure the output voltages with the high-resolution oscillograph, but I also do the necessary plausibility checks with the memory multimeter before each run. The beauty of this multimeter is, for example, the very high sensitivity and the ability to also determine and accurately control frequencies of the measured AC voltages. In the simplified measurement setup, I only use resistive loads at the output, i.e. I terminate the output of the sound solutions with a 32- or 500-ohm resistor. Open outputs would be very impractical and therefore pointless.

The low impedance measurements are interesting when it comes to mainstream headphones with impedances between 16 and 50 ohms, the other measurements with the terminating resistance of 500 ohms are important for connecting external speaker systems (analog input) or high impedance headphones with impedances between 250 and 600 ohms. Because there are also (not only, but especially) in the professional environment (then quite often).

Before I now come to the measurements and theoretical basics, I have also prepared the most important onboard chips for you as a detailed overview and comparison. Please turn the page!

168 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

Case39

Urgestein

2,497 Kommentare 928 Likes

Erstmal frohes Fest allen im Forum. Wie verhält es sich mit Stereolautsprechern und Onboard Sound (und wo wir grad dabei sind, welche kannst du empfehlen?)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,159 Kommentare 18,734 Likes

Aus der Sicht der Transienten und Intermodulation würde ich gar nichts analog Angeschlossenes empfehlen.

Wer es clever anstellen will: einfach einen Satz Aktivlautsprecher mit eigenen Wandlern bestellen (USB oder SPDIF). Klingt hörbar besser und ist frei vom üblichen DSP-Gedöns der Treiber. Für den Desktop (Geld vorausgesetzt) ein Paar Nubert nuPro A100 oder A200 und ggf. einen Sub dazu. Ansonsten Wavemaster, Edifier oder gleich einen Satz Aktivmonitore aus der Studiotechnik. Die gibt es schon recht günstig:

https://www.thomann.de/de/aktive_nahfeldmonitore.html?ref=search_prv_0

Antwort 3 Likes

D
Deridex

Urgestein

2,210 Kommentare 846 Likes

Schöne Analyse Igor.

Aus Entwicklungs- und Layouttechnischer Sicht, wäre es meiner Meinung sogar möglich, die Störungen und das Überkoppeln zu reduzieren.
1. Jeden PCIe-Slot mit mehrstufigen Block-Kondensatoren ausstatten. Ist leider mit einem einzigen Kondensator nicht getan, da man ja einen größeren Frequenzbereich abdecken will
2. Konsequente Trennung von Analog und Digitalteil auf dem Layout. Hier muss durchaus etwas Abstand zwischen den Leiterbahnen gehalten werden, da die digitalen Flanken sonst kapazitiv überkoppeln
3. Saubere Trennung der Massen.

So oder so ist das mit Aufwand und Kosten verbunden. Zusätzlich verschlimmert eine dimmbare RGB-Beleuchtungen die Thematik noch weiter.

Edit: Wünsche euch allen schöne, ruhige und entspannten Feiertage! Und Tippfehler korrigiert.

Antwort 1 Like

D
Dezor

Veteran

492 Kommentare 215 Likes

Zunächst mal danke für diesen (wiedermal) umfangreichen Test.

Als ich mir vor ~2 meinen Beyerdynamic Kopfhörer gegönnt habe, musste ich mir auch ein neues externes Soundinterface zulegen, der Unterschied war mehr als deutlich zu hören, selbst bei meinen "Holzohren". Inzwischen hängt das Mischpult am MacBook und der PC Sound wird beim Zocken von der internen Soundkarte durchgeschleift. Ja, man hört die Störgeräusche leider mehr als deutlich. Aber da ich über das MacBook Videos gucke, Musik höre und Teamspeak benutze, ist mir das so wichtiger. Die meiste Zeit ist der Sound vom PC sowieso aus.

Zum Test: Ein kleiner Fehler ist mir auf Seite 2 aufgefallen. Die Sinusleistung liegt bei 14 mW, nicht bei 1,4 mW (oder ich finde meinen Denkfehler nicht). Zudem könntest du wenn du Langeweile hast mal gucken, ob du die Störgeräusche durch Fouriertransformation oder Abziehen eines Sinus von den gemessenen Werten noch deutlicher machen kannst.

Ansonsten: schöne Feiertage.

Antwort 1 Like

Bas3s3to

Mitglied

30 Kommentare 5 Likes

Vielen Dank Igor für diesen Test. Wäre es möglich für die Zukunft auch den Mikrofoneingang zu messen? Ein Freund von mir hat mit seiner internen Soundkarte massive Probleme mit dem Mikrofoneingang, wenn seine Grafikkarte auf volle Leistung in Spielen getrieben wird. Im Teamspeak klingt seine Audioübertragung dann so, als ob er in einem Hubschrauber sitzt. Man kann sehr gut das Taktverhalten der Grafikkarte hören, die dann in den Mikrofonkanal Störgeräusche einstrahlt. Das ist ihm zuerst aufgefallen, als er sich ein ModMic für seine Beyerdynamic Kopfhörer geholt hat. Zuerst hat er sich mit dem Onboard Mikrofoneingang beholfen, nutzt nun aber ein USB-Audiointerface (Yamaha AG03). Das ModMic wurde mittlerweile von einem Kondensatormikrofon (Rode NT-1A) abgelöst.

Kann es sein, dass bei der Rechnung (0,678 V)² / 32 Ohm = 1,4 mW Sinus ein kleiner Fehler drin ist? Wenn ich das ausrechne, komme ich auf 14,37 mW. Dann wäre bei einem reinen Sinus Signal die Leistung doppelt so hoch wie beim Vrms Wert. Das würde dann auch den abfallenden Lautstärke Effekt erklären, den viele Personen bei komplexeren Signalen empfinden. Bei einfachen Signalen ist die Lautstärke ausreichend und bricht dann bei komplexeren Signalen ein.

Ich wünsche allen fröhliche Weihnachten

Edit: War grade am schreiben, als Dezor den gleichen Gedanken wie ich mit der Rechnung auf Seite 2 geposted hat.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Igor Wallossek

1

10,159 Kommentare 18,734 Likes

Klar. Kommastelle und so. Danke fürs Finden :)

Antwort 1 Like

Bas3s3to

Mitglied

30 Kommentare 5 Likes

Passiert mir auch immer wieder ;) Gerade bei kleinen Werten passiert das ganz schnell. War nur etwas stutzig geworden, da das Ergebnis der Rechnung mit dem größeren Wert ein kleineres Ergebnis ergab. Deswegen hatte ich das nochmal nachgerechnet.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,159 Kommentare 18,734 Likes

Ich hatte unlängst eine längere Diskussion mit einem Audiotechniker und -Entwickler, was die RMS-Angaben betrifft. Früher gab es Sinusleistung und Musikleistung, mache schrieben von Impulsleistung und dem, was ein "weiches" Netzteil mit möglichst großen Kondensatoren ausmacht. Auch diese Dinge waren nicht zwingend pauschal zu verstehen und zu verallgemeinern. :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

g
ge0815

Neuling

8 Kommentare 5 Likes

Erstmal: Frohe Weihnachten auch an Dich und Dein Team!
Wunderbarer Artikel mal wieder. Um ehrlich zu sein, haben mich Lautsprecher- und Kopfhörertests nie so brennend interessiert, aber das hier ist wirklich erste Sahne und weckt das Interesse für die anderen Artikel.
Ich sehe es schon kommen, dass in nicht mal einem Jahr einige Motherboard-Herstelle auch angesprochene Werte angeben und wieder mehr Wert darauf legen.
Igor setzt eben Maßstäbe :)

Antwort 1 Like

Bas3s3to

Mitglied

30 Kommentare 5 Likes

Ich kann mich auch noch an diese abstrusen PMPO Angaben erinnern, wo einfache Boxen auf einmal 1000 W haben sollten. Das es sich dabei nur um kurzzeitige Impuls Werte gehandelt hat, haben die Marketingabteilungen von so manchem Discounter nicht interessiert.

Bei Instrumentenverstärkern ist das auch ähnlich. Als ich damals mit dem E-Bass angefangen habe, wurde immer empfohlen, einen Verstärker mit der drei- bis fünffachen Leistung des Verstärkers des Gitarristen zu nehmen. Ich habe mir aber bewusst einen kleineren Übungsverstärker mit 150 W besorgt, den ich über die Anschlüsse auch ins Mischpult und die PA-Anlage speisen kann. Auch waren die Tipps zum Soundmischen aus dem Bereich Homerecording sehr hilfreich. Durch die Tipps haben wir die Instrumente von den Frequenzen her etwas entzerrt, um Interferenzen zu verhindern. Das hat aus einem muffig klingenden Sound einen recht knackigen Sound gemacht. Man muss halt immer über den Tellerrand schauen und sich nicht mit den allgemeinen Tipps zufrieden geben :D

Und um wieder zurück zum Thema zu kommen ;):

Wie könnte man auf einem Mainboard den Audioteil gut vor Störsignalen der Grafikkarte abschirmen? Da auf dem Mainboard alles so eng zusammenliegt, könnte ich mir das durchaus als schwierige, wenn nicht sogar als unmögliche Aufgabe vorstellen. Wobei ich vermute, dass vor allem die Eingangsseite (Mikrofon) am schwierigsten abzuschirmen ist.

Das die Empfehlung zu einer vollkommenen elektrischen Trennung von Computer und Audioverstärker mittels optischer Signalübertragung der beste Weg ist, steht außer Frage. Nicht umsonst haben viele professionelle Audiogeräte optische Ein- und Ausgänge.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
D
Deridex

Urgestein

2,210 Kommentare 846 Likes

Bei kleinen Mainboards dürfte das wirklich schwierig werden. Allerdings erscheint es mir durchaus machbar bei einem AM4 oder LGA1151 Board im ATX-Format, das Layout so anzupassen, das der Audioteil weniger gestört wird.

Antwort Gefällt mir

K
KalleWirsch

Veteran

186 Kommentare 91 Likes

Sehr gut und verständlich geschrieben. Daher ein dickes Lob.

Allerdings wird hier immer vom Szenario Kopfhörer an Soundkarte ausgegangen. Wie kann man die Erkenntnisse denn auf die Situation übertragen, wenn man mit dem analogen Audio Signal erst mal in einen Verstärker geht und dort den Kopfhörer anschließt?

Im Grunde braucht man doch eh immer einen externen Verstärker, den für mich ist ein Kopfhörer irgendwie immer erst mal ein Komfort-Problem, welches das Hör-Erlebnis erheblich beeinträchtigt.

Ich vermute das Problem mit den Störsignalen ist da genauso hoch? Oder größer oder niedriger?
Das Problem mit der zu niedrigen Ausgangspannung für Kopfhörer dürfte ja je nach Verstärker eher ausgeschlossen sein.

Wenn schon Kopfhörer am PC, dann doch am liebsten einen Mittelklasse HIFI-Verträrker in der Tastatur oder am Monitor, so das man das Problemlos ein und austecken kann.

Antwort Gefällt mir

D
Dezor

Veteran

492 Kommentare 215 Likes

Grundsätzlich schon. Dann müsste die GPU wahrscheinlich möglichst weit unten sitzen und der Audio-Chip dort, wo normalerweise der erste Slot für Erweiterungskarten ist. Ansonsten müsste man auf dem Weg zu den Klinkenbuchsen wieder an der GPU vorbei.

Das Problem ist, dass du das gestörte Signal verstärkst und damit auch die Störungen. Allerdings könnte es tatsächlich etwas besser sein, wenn du in Windows den maximalen Pegel wählst und dann beim Verstärker die Lautstärke dann regelst. Aber das hängt davon ab, wo die Störungen eingekoppelt werden.

Da kommt es dann drauf an, wo der DA-Wandler sitzt. Weit entfernt von der GPU ist schonmal gut, aber ich vermute mal stark, dass in Tastaturen und Monitoren keine wirklich hochwertige Hardware zum Einsatz kommt. Die Soundqualität dürfte damit deutlich schlechter sein als bei hochwertigen externen Soundkarten. Aber die Störgeräusche, um die es in diesem Artikel primär geht, sollten dadurch weitgehend verhindert werden.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,159 Kommentare 18,734 Likes

Steht alles im Artikel. Seite 3.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Corro Dedd

Urgestein

1,807 Kommentare 664 Likes

Digitale Aus- bzw. Eingänge haben aber anscheinend auch ihre Tücken. Habe meinem Kumpel die Edifier Studio R2000DB empfohlen, diese sollte er über Toslink anklemmen, hat soweit auch funktioniert, nur hat er zwei Probleme:

Zum einen ist seine Steckerleiste und der PC auf der linken Seite vom Tisch, zudem auch die optische Leitung nicht lang genug, also sind die Seiten vertauscht. Ohne Drittanbietersoftware war es (auch im Treibermenü) nicht möglich unter Windows 10 die Kanäle zu tauschen. Also doch analog angeschlossen mit dem beigelegten Klinke-Cinch Kabel war es dann auch ganz einfach physikalisch möglich die Kanäle zu tauschen.

Gut, man könnte jetzt halt ein Verlängerungskabel kaufen, ein längeres Toslink und das Problem wäre gegessen, aber dann bleibt noch ein weiteres Problem mit dem Digitaleingang: Er hatte ein Knacksen in den Lautsprechern, auch wenn keine Audioquelle ein Signal ausgab. Viele Meinungen besagen, das sind Störungen, eingestreut durch Kühlschrank, Backofen, whatever, oder eine fehlerhafte Auto-Mute Funktion der Lautsprecher, wenn kein Signal anliegt, mein Tablet macht so ähnliche Geräusche beim Abspielen von YouTube Videos im Browser zum Beispiel.

Man kann bei den Edifiern wohl die Firmware updaten, das Auto-Mute Problem ist schon länger bekannt. Aber ich weiß nicht, ob der das schon gemacht hat. Dafür hat er weiter recherchiert und nun scheint es eine Kombination aus NVidia Grafikkarte, Z370 Chipsatz, ALC 1220 Chip und Digital-out zu sein, wobei die Ursache wohl im Nvidia Treiber liegen soll. Andererseits hat er ein Board mit Z390.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Igor Wallossek

1

10,159 Kommentare 18,734 Likes

Z390 ist quasi Z370. Hochgelabelt ;)

Antwort 3 Likes

FfFCMAD

Urgestein

668 Kommentare 173 Likes

Schoener Artikel, Igor

Antwort Gefällt mir

arcDaniel

Urgestein

1,562 Kommentare 829 Likes

Ich habe den Artikel spannend gelesen und noch einen weiteren Fall wo ich deine @Igor Wallossek Einschätzung lesen möchte.

Wenn ich nun meine aktiven Lautspecher am Bildschirm anschliesse und welcher wiederum den "digitalen sound" übers DisplayPort oder HDMI bekommt, in welcher Katergorie würden wir uns denn bewegen? Externe Soundkarte? MB Intern im Idle? Kann der Monitor stärkere Stögeräusche als das Innenleben eines PCs verursachen? oder vielleicht weniger?

Antwort 1 Like

g
guggi

Mitglied

27 Kommentare 17 Likes

Hab mich jetzt auch endlich angemeldet, super Artikel seit der Umstrukturierung!
Die "Macht" einer Grafikkarte musste ich auch erst vor kurzem erleben, hatte seit Ewigkeiten Probleme mit dem WLAN und war kurz vorm verzweifeln. Ein Slot mehr Abstand zur Graka und schon war das Problem deutlich gelindert, dafür hörte man jede mausbewegung in den Lautsprechern, da sich jetzt die Soundkarte zur Graka kuscheln durfe. Also wurde es eben eine externe Lösung fürs Netzwerk.
Aber zurück zum Thema: Wie schlägt sich denn eine vor Jahren gern empfohlene Budget-Headset-Lösung gegen aktuelle (onboard)-Hardware? Konkret handelt es sich dabei um einen umgelabelten Superlux-kopfhörer, den Presonus HD7 in Kombination mit einer Xonar DGX. Die Soundkarte musste sein, da die onboard des billig-am3+ bretts einfach grausam war. Naja Schülerbudget zu der Zeit eben.
Mittlerweile leg ich doch etwas mehr Wert auf Klangqualität und frage mich, ob es Empfehlungen gibt, die mich nicht mein letztes Hemd kosten?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung