CPU Gaming Reviews System

Intel Core i5-12400 Review – Efficient and cheap gaming CPU for the masses with way too expensive motherboards | Part 1

Today I want to test the Intel Core i5-12400 in gaming first, before there will of course be the follow up with real application benchmarks soon. I used two brand new B660 motherboards as a base this time and also compare the DDR4 with a DDR5 version of the MSI MAG B660M Mortar WiFi, because there are some really interesting differences with partial advantages for both RAM versions. Actually both motherboards are more or less identical and they only differ in the memory connection. The CPU doesn’t really care, because it can do both.

Interestingly, I can spoil this in advance, my tests with the emulated CPU were almost exactly on the same level as today’s results. All done right, and if one were malicious, one would almost think I could have actually saved myself today’s test. But – the next pages will show that too – different boards, different RAM, highly interesting details. And the real Core i5-12400 is even a bit more frugal than the already stingy emulated processor. So the world could be really nice, if it weren’t for the senselessly overpriced motherboards. But I’ll get to that in a minute. Fact is: you always have to see such a system in the sum of CPU and motherboard. But that’s exactly what’s going to be interesting now, let us surprise you.

The CPU, in the form of the Core i5-12400, is a true retail CPU, like the ones customers can buy in stores, and I deliberately decided against a Core i5-12400F when I bought it because I also want to test the integrated UHD graphics at a later date. But that is not the goal today, instead we will look at the suitability as a gaming CPU in the (lower) mid-range. With a base clock of 2.5 GHz and turbo clocks of 4.4 GHz (max. 2 cores), 4.2 GHz (max. 4 cores) as well as 4.0 GHz (allcore), the key data corresponds exactly to what could be read everywhere in advance.

What is the Intel Core i5-12400 on the B660 motherboard really capable of in workstation and productive use case? Our practice test | Part 2

In addition, the L3 cache is reduced by 2 MB compared to the i5-12600(K/F) with 18 MB, which is also due to the different layout, since the mask of the small Core i5 generally does not provide for E-cores. The one block of the cache, which is otherwise stuck in the area of the smaller E-cores in the scheme, can be omitted at the same time. In addition, AVX512 is also dropped out of the box, no matter what microcode has just been implemented in the BIOS. This is where Intel pulled the ripcord from the start. Where would we end up if every Tom, Dick and Harry with the economical 6-cores would also set up cheap servers? This move is not only incomprehensible from the customer’s point of view, but also costs sympathy points once again. Intel could have clearly scored points here compared to the competitor in terms of features. But they don’t want to, for whatever reason.

Once again an overview of the CPUs tested so far and the new Core i5-12400 as a tabular comparison:

CPU name P-/E-Cores Cores/
Threads
P-Core
Base/Turbo
GHz
P-Core
All-Core
GHz
E-Core
Base/Turbo
GHz
E-Core
All-Core
GHz
L3
Cache
PL1
TDP
W
PL2
TDP
W
Core i9-12900KF 8/8 16 / 24 3.2 / 5.2 5.0 2.4 / 3.9 3.7 30 MB 125 241
Core i7-12700K 8/4 12 / 20 3.6 / 5.0 4.7 2.7 / 3.8 3.6 25 MB 125 190
Core i5-12600K 6/4 10 / 16 3.7 / 4.9 4.5 2.8 / 3.6 3.4 20 MB 125 150
Core i5-12400 6/0 6 / 12 2.5 / 4.4 4.0 N/A N/A 18 MB 65 117

Of course, Intel launches even more non-K processors today, whose listing is quite interesting. The T and H series I will indroduce in a follow up. You can simply click on the graphic to enlarge it:

The B660 chipset compared to Z690 and H670

The least sacrifice compared to the big Z690 will be the H670 chipset, which unfortunately was not available to me on any board. Because this can also be connected to the CPU via 8 DMI 4.0 lanes and also supports the total of 16 PCIe 5 lanes coming from the CPU, which could also be used separately as two x8 lines. The number of PCIe 3.0 lanes supported drops from 16 to 12, and USB 3.2 Gen 2×2 ports are a maximum of two instead of the four on the Z690, USB 3.2 Gen 2 only four instead of the 10 on the Z690, and USB 3.2 Gen 1 eight instead of ten. The rest, as well as the number of possible USB 2.0 and SATA 3.0 ports, remains unchanged between the H670 and Z690.

The B660 chipset, on the other hand, as a low-priced variant for the broad masses, no longer offers a division of the PCIe 5.0 lanes on the part of the CPU. The number of DMI links to the processor is also halved to just 4 and the PCIe lanes offered by the chipset itself are also more minimalist with six PCIe 4.0 and eight PCI 3.0. There are fewer ports for USB 3.2 Gen 1 and USB 2.0, and SATA support is also halved to four ports. In the case of the B660, however, it ultimately depends on the board manufacturer and the model, because all functions will probably never be available at the same time, which is probably also due to the necessary multiple assignment of the GPIO lanes. I’ll leave the H610 out of this for now, we’ll catch up with that with the very small CPUs.

I use, also out of pure habit and because my reseller of confidence carries these parts, two almost identically constructed and absolutely identically equipped B660 boards from MSI, so that the results are better comparable as well. You can see their equipment on the next two pages. However, these retail boards were still equipped with older firmware and thus also the old microcode. So of course I tried what works and what doesn’t with AVX512. While the i9-12900KF with Microcode version 12 could still do AVX512, the feature is already missing with the current Microcode 18. In the following gallery you can see that even with the old BIOS no AVX512 was available for the real Core i5-12400, so it wasn’t implemented “temporarily”.

By the way, I noticed that the performance of the Core i5-12400 with the old BIOS was significantly worse in contrast to the i5-12600K and especially the achieved Turbo clock was significantly lower with less than 6 cores. The buyer of these boards is thus virtually obligated to either question the BIOS version at the reseller and to press for a BIOS update and/or or to carry this out himself. On the DDR5 board this made up for almost 7% more performance, which is really a lot!

Benchmarks, Test system and evaluation software

The measurement of the detailed power consumption and other, more profound things is done here in the special laboratory (where at the end in the air-conditioned room also the thermographic infrared recordings are made with a high-resolution industrial camera) on two tracks by means of high-resolution oscillograph technology (follow-ups!) and the self-created, MCU-based measurement setup for motherboards and graphics cards (pictures below).

The audio measurements are done outside in my Chamber (room within a room). But all in good time, because today it’s all about gaming (for now).

I have also summarized the individual components of the test system in a table:

Test System and Equipment
Hardware:

Intel LGA 1700
Core i9-12900KF (PL1 241W), Core i7-12700K (PL1 241W), Core i5-12600K (PL1 150W)
MSI MEG Z690 Unify
2x 16 GB Corsair Dominator DDR5 5200 @ 5200 Gear 2

Core i5-12400 (PL1 65W, PL2 150 W)
MSI MAG B660 Mortar WiFi
2x 16 GB Corsair Dominator DDR5 5200 @ 5200 Gear 2

Core i5-12400 (PL1 65W, PL2 188 W)
MSI MAG B660 Mortar WiFi DDR4
2x 16 GB Corsair DDR4 4000 Vengeance RGB Pro @ 3733 Gear 1

Intel LGA 1200
Core i9-11900K, Core i7-11700K, Core i5-11600K
MSI MEG Z590 Unify
2x 16 GB Corsair DDR4 4000 Vengeance RGB Pro @ 3733 Gear 1

AMD AM4
Ryzen 9 5950X, Ryzen 9 5900X, Ryzen 7 5800X, Ryzen 5 5600X
MSI MEG X570 Godlike
2x 16 GB Corsair DDR4 4000 Vengeance RGB Pro @ 3800 1:1

MSI Radeon RX 6900XT Gaming X OC (Gaming)
NVIDIA RTX A6000 (Workstation)
1x 1 TB Patriot Viper 4100
1x 2 TB Corsair MP660 Pro XT
Be Quiet! Dark Power Pro 12 1200 Watt

Cooling:
Aqua Computer Cuplex Kryos Next, Custom LGA 1700 Backplate (hand-made)
Custom Loop Water Cooling / Chiller
Alphacool Subzero
Case:
Coolermaster Benchtable
Monitor: LG OLED55 G19LA
Power Consumption:
Oscilloscope-based system:
Non-contact direct current measurement on PCIe slot (riser card)
Non-contact direct current measurement at the external PCIe power supply
Direct voltage measurement at the respective connectors and at the power supply unit
2x Rohde & Schwarz HMO 3054, 500 MHz multichannel oscilloscope with memory function
4x Rohde & Schwarz HZO50, current clamp adapter (1 mA to 30 A, 100 KHz, DC)
4x Rohde & Schwarz HZ355, probe (10:1, 500 MHz)
1x Rohde & Schwarz HMC 8012, HiRes digital multimeter with memory function

MCU-based shunt measuring (own build, Powenetics software)
Up to 10 channels (max. 100 values per second)
Special riser card with shunts for the PCIe x16 Slot (PEG)
NVIDIA PCAT and FrameView 1.1

Thermal Imager:
1x Optris PI640 + 2x Xi400 Thermal Imagers
Pix Connect Software
Type K Class 1 thermal sensors (up to 4 channels)
OS: Windows 11 Pro (all updates/patches, current certified or press VGA drivers)

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

ipat66

Urgestein

650 Kommentare 550 Likes

Nanu....
Abendliche Überraschung !
Gratulation zu Deiner Emulation....
War mal wieder eine echte Punktlandung.

Schöne neue Konkurrenz.
Sobald die Boardpreise purzeln,eine echte Alternative
gegenüber AMD.

Schade,dass es bei den GPU's nicht in die gleiche Richtung geht.

Antwort 1 Like

konkretor

Veteran

239 Kommentare 226 Likes

Danke für den Test.

Schöne CPU. Wird AMD zusetzen in dem Preis Bereich

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

Format©

7,591 Kommentare 12,647 Likes

Naja, ich habe nur zwei Hände und es war zuviel, um noch die ganze CES zu tickern :D
Video habe ich ja nebenher auch noch eins gemacht. :D

CES war eh eher enttäuschend. Nur Ankündigungen :(

Antwort 1 Like

P
Pokerclock

Veteran

131 Kommentare 98 Likes

Es könnte so schön sein für Intel. Die herbste Enttäuschung ist leider die Preisgestaltung der B660-Boards. Für Leute, die einfach nur spielen wollen, nix tunen, nix basteln, nix am Dauer-Temperatur-Kontrollieren zählt faktisch nur der Preis und für mich als Händler Haltbarkeit und zu erwartende Praxisprobleme (siehe verbogene Boards). Erst vor ein paar Tagen ein System mit 11400f und B560 von Asrock (Pro4) verkauft. Locker unter 250 € in der Kombination weitergegeben. Für Sockel 1700 komme ich aktuell an die 400 € ran. Das wiegt dann auch nicht die Mehrleistung und Effizienz auf. Das ist vergleichbar mit 5600X und guten B550-Boards mit einer Plattform, die weitestgehend durch optimiert ist. Und so schade wie es ist, ich kann mich nicht zurück erinnern, dass mal ein Kunde explizit nach niedrigem Stromverbrauch gefragt hat. Vielleicht kommt das dieses Jahr, wenn die ersten Abschlagszahlungen massiv erhöht werden. Aber aktuell ist Stromverbrauch kein Thema. Selbst Thema Hitze, Stichwort Glasgehäuse, muss ich jedes Mal dem Kunden massivst erklären, warum und wieso etc. man doch vielleicht ein Gehäuse mit ein paar Löchern mehr nehmen sollte.

Antwort 2 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Igor Wallossek

Format©

7,591 Kommentare 12,647 Likes

Sehe ich ähnlich. Die Boards sind die neuen Aufpreislisten :(

H610 ist quasi so verkrüppelt, das man das nicht nutzen kann.

Antwort 1 Like

Arnonymious

Veteran

113 Kommentare 35 Likes

Danke für den Test. Wie immer sehr aufschlussreich.
@Igor Wallossek : Wie schaut es denn hier mit den verbogenen Sockeln aus. Gibt es mit den B660 Boards auch diese Probleme?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

Format©

7,591 Kommentare 12,647 Likes

Mit richtiger Backplate nicht. Bissl biegt sichs natürlich auch, wenn man nicht aufpüasst. Aber das PCB vom Mortar ist auch nicht ganz so wabbelig.

Antwort 2 Likes

Arnonymious

Veteran

113 Kommentare 35 Likes

Danke, gut zu wissen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

e
eastcoast_pete

Veteran

367 Kommentare 121 Likes

Zunächst nochmals ein Gutes Neues, und Danke für den Test. Bin schon gespannt auf Teil 2, denn Anwendungen sind bei mir auch wichtig.
Igor, da Du ja gute Kontakte zu diversen Herstellern hast, weißt Du vielleicht die Antwort zu dieser Frage: Welchen Anteil haben die Preise, die Intel den Board Herstellern für die verschiedenen PCHs berechnet denn nun an den Board Preisen? Anders herum, wieviel Schuld kann man Intel geben für Boardpreise mit Mittelklasse Chip-Sets (660) die erst bei €200 anfangen? Denn momentan bremst sich Intel hier zunächst Mal selbst am stärksten aus.

Antwort Gefällt mir

LeovonBastler

Mitglied

42 Kommentare 13 Likes

Vielen Dank für den Test. Schön, dass etwas Fahrt in den CPU-Markt kommt, dass aber die Mainboards so gesalzene Preise haben, ist aber wirklich schwierig. Ich weiss ja nicht aber ich frage mich, wie wohl die unteren Boards sein werden ob sie ausreichen.
H610 ist ja halt wirklich stark beschnitten, gerade dass diese Boards nur Single-Channel unterstützen ist krass.
Allerdings ist mir auch nicht bewusst, wie teuer Dual-Channel zu realisieren ist.

Auf den Prozessor habe ich aber etwas gewartet. Nicht als Kunde, sondern eher als Zuschauer der "Hersteller-Kampfarena" oder so ähnlich, da die 400er Klassen-CPUs von Intel so ziemlich die interessantesten sind, wenn man nicht nach den letzten paar % Leistung aus ist.
Dementsprechend bin ich gespannt auf AMDs Reaktion.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
k
krelog

Veteran

127 Kommentare 30 Likes

Danke für den Test aber was haben die B660 Boadpreise mit der CPU zu tun in der Bewertung?
Weil umgedreht nehme ich dafür das MSI Z690 Goodlike oder Asus Maxiumus Extrem Glacial und da ist das Bundle immer extrem überteuert.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

Format©

7,591 Kommentare 12,647 Likes

Weil es nun mal keine günstigen Bretter für diese CPU gibt und ohne Board nützt sie dir nichts.
Man muss es einfach mal in der Einheit sehen. H610 ist Single-Channel und komplett nutzlos.

Antwort 3 Likes

RX480

Urgestein

1,205 Kommentare 609 Likes

Hoffentlich gibts dann auch preiswertere B660er ohne Wifi. (Wifi scheint ja der Preistreiber bei manchen Herstellern zu sein)

DDR4 kann wie vorhergesagt, auch bis 4000 ohne Probleme zu laufen. (DDR5 lief bei OC3D auch nur mit 5200)
(was evtl. ein kleiner Vorteil ggü. dem 5600x sein könnte)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Werner Wernersen

Mitglied

39 Kommentare 46 Likes

Es schwirren doch Preislisten im netz rum, z.B. die MSI B660 Boards, wo die Preise bei 119$ losgehen.
Diese Preise passen sicher besser zu dieser CPU.

Antwort 1 Like

M
Mr.Danger

Mitglied

58 Kommentare 31 Likes

Super Test. Hat Spaß gemacht den zu lesen. Der neue "kleine" von Intel wird sehr beliebt bei Sparfüchsen und OEM's werden. Schade das das Gesamtpaket CPU+MB+DDR5 preislich noch nicht optimal ist, sonst würde AMD stark in Bedrängnis geraten, denn in diesem Preisbereich hat aktuell AMD nicht im Programm wird. Wobei dem Otto Normalverbraucher die Prozessorgeneration primär egal sein wird, das weiß auch AMD und schaut gemütlich dem treiben von Intel zu.😉
@Igor Wallossek Mir persönlich fehlt der Vergleich mit dem direkten Vorgänger Intel Core I5-11400 in den Charts.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Advertising

Advertising