CPU Reviews System Workstations

What is the Intel Core i5-12400 on the B660 motherboard really capable of in workstation and productive use case? Our practice test | Part 2

Can you really work efficiently and productively with an Intel Core i5-12400? And will DDR4 suffice instead of the expensive and unavailable DDR5 memory? Even if some questions remain unanswered and a “It depends” would be the most diplomatic answer, Intel’s small Core i5 isn’t that bad either. But is that enough against an AMD Ryzen 5 5600X? We already had the first gaming test with many benchmarks online. Today, however, we want to take a closer look at where the two gaming variants with the Core i5-12400 can still score to some extent away from colorful gaming worlds and whether it remains just as frugal and efficient.

Gaming is actually overrated when you take a closer look at the benchmarks from 1440p. Thus, the true strengths of the new architecture will hardly be seen while gaming, but I wonder if it will still look like that in the workstation test and without the small E-cores. And that’s exactly what it’s all about today, especially since it’s very application-dependent whether you go for DDR4 or DDR5. But that’s exactly why I do such tests with real full programs and not just the pure synthetics that nobody uses anyway. Cinebench is abundantly pointless for practical use, regardless of revision.

A word in advance about the memory choice between DDR4 and DDR5. I decided to make a direct comparison due to the poor portability and the contradiction between the low-priced platform and the current memory prices. The Kingston Fury Beast DDR5-5333 is definitely up to the mark, even though faster DDR4 memory is hardly slower. But that is exactly what we want to find out in detail in the test.

For today’s test, I deliberately use the same platform as the day before yesterday for gaming, also with identical settings. This also makes it easier to compare where your preferences are better: gaming or working. Or maybe even both, who knows? For today’s test I used a current Core i5-12400 as retail version according to the motherboard specifications for the “boxed” cooler at the power limits. Thus, the PL1 is 65 watts (long duration) and the PL2 is 169 watts (short duration, 28 seconds). But I can already spoil that this maximum value will never be reached, no matter how high you set it. The current limit (short duration) is 175 amps.

Intel Core i5-12400 Review – Efficient and cheap gaming CPU for the masses with way too expensive motherboards | Part 1

In gaming, it’s usually the graphics card that slows things down, in productive use and especially in design and construction, it’s almost always the CPU. I’m using an NVIDIA RTX A6000 for testing, which also wants a snappy underbelly when outputting real-time 3D views, whether it’s using OpenGL or DirectX. Many a CAD program is even worse than the nastiest 720p gaming test in this regard, cue AutoCAD. But I’ll get to that in a minute. Solidworks and Inventor Pro are also demanding, but they contain very different workloads, from light to heavy, which can occur at the same time. This is where Alder Lake S should be able to play to its strengths, which will have to be proven even without helping E-cores.

And I also have to preface this review with the fact that the current Ryzen CPUs, first and foremost the comparable Ryzen 5 5600X, are not degraded to silicon waste with today’s release and you also don’t have to have any reason to panic about suddenly not being able to work with them from one day to the next. Only the efficiency has to be practiced again with AMD, because Intel has really delivered a benchmark with the Core i5-12400. But let’s be surprised, I won’t spoil anything yet.

Benchmarks, Test system and evaluation software

The measurement of the detailed power consumption and other, more profound things is done here in the special laboratory (where at the end in the air-conditioned room also the thermographic infrared recordings are made with a high-resolution industrial camera) on two tracks by means of high-resolution oscillograph technology (follow-ups!) and the self-created, MCU-based measurement setup for motherboards and graphics cards (pictures below).

The audio measurements are done outside in my Chamber (room within a room). But all in good time, because today it’s all about gaming (for now).

I have also summarized the individual components of the test system in a table:

Test System and Equipment
Hardware:

Intel LGA 1700
Core i9-12900KF (PL1 241W), Core i7-12700K (PL1 241W), Core i5-12600K (PL1 150W)
MSI MEG Z690 Unify
2x 16 GB Corsair Dominator DDR5-5200 @ 5333 Gear 2

Core i5-12400 (PL1 65W, PL2 169 W)
MSI MAG B660 Mortar WiFi
2x 8 GB Kingston Fury Beast DDR5-5333 @ 5333 Gear 2

Core i5-12400 (PL1 65W, PL2 169 W)
MSI MAG B660 Mortar WiFi DDR4
2x 16 GB Corsair DDR4-4000 Vengeance RGB Pro @ 3733 Gear 1

Intel LGA 1200
Core i9-11900K, Core i7-11700K, Core i5-11600K
MSI MEG Z590 Unify
2x 16 GB Corsair DDR4-4000 Vengeance RGB Pro @ 3733 Gear 1

AMD AM4
Ryzen 9 5950X, Ryzen 9 5900X, Ryzen 7 5800X, Ryzen 5 5600X
MSI MEG X570 Godlike, PBO auto
2x 16 GB Corsair DDR4-4000 Vengeance RGB Pro @ 3800 1:1

NVIDIA RTX A6000

1x 2 TB MSI Spatium M480
1x 2 TB Corsair MP660 Pro XT
Be Quiet! Dark Power Pro 12 1200 Watt

Cooling:
Aqua Computer Cuplex Kryos Next, Custom LGA 1200/1700 Backplate (hand-made)
Custom Loop Water Cooling / Chiller
Alphacool Subzero
Case:
Cooler Master Benchtable
Monitor: LG OLED55 G19LA
Power Consumption:
Oscilloscope-based system:
Non-contact direct current measurement on PCIe slot (riser card)
Non-contact direct current measurement at the external PCIe power supply
Direct voltage measurement at the respective connectors and at the power supply unit
2x Rohde & Schwarz HMO 3054, 500 MHz multichannel oscilloscope with memory function
4x Rohde & Schwarz HZO50, current clamp adapter (1 mA to 30 A, 100 KHz, DC)
4x Rohde & Schwarz HZ355, probe (10:1, 500 MHz)
1x Rohde & Schwarz HMC 8012, HiRes digital multimeter with memory function

MCU-based shunt measuring (own build, Powenetics software)
Up to 10 channels (max. 100 values per second)
Special riser card with shunts for the PCIe x16 Slot (PEG)
NVIDIA PCAT and FrameView 1.1

Thermal Imager:
1x Optris PI640 + 2x Xi400 Thermal Imagers
Pix Connect Software
Type K Class 1 thermal sensors (up to 4 channels)
OS: Windows 11 Pro (all updates/patches, current certified or press VGA drivers)

 

Lade neue Kommentare

P
Pokerclock

Mitglied

15 Kommentare 10 Likes

Die bittere Wahrheit hinter der Effizienz ist leider, dass diese in diesem speziellen Kundenkreis überhaupt nicht nachgefragt wird. Die Leute sind dafür leider zu stark getrieben von Abgabeterminen und davon Arbeitsstunden einzuhalten. In der Folge wird budgetabhängig eigentlich immer das Dickschiff gewählt, gerne auch mal gleich mehrere Systeme auf einmal mieten, wenn möglich. Und dann gibt es noch den Kundenkreis (hauptsächlich wo für Live-Szenen Rechenleistung gebraucht wird), die von vornherein auf Nummer sicher gehen und viel zu leistungsstarke Systeme ordern, Hauptsache es läuft alles einwandfrei. Würde es wohl auch mit nem 6 Kerner tun, am Ende wird dann doch der 16 Kerner geordert. Preislich macht es oftmals auch gar nichts aus im Vergleich zum Umsatz, der durch die erbrachte Leistung erzielt wird. Ob nun 200 € oder 700 € für ne CPU oder eben den ganzen PC draufgehen, fällt hier nicht weiter ins Gewicht, wenn der Auftrag locker 5-stellig Umsatz generiert.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Casi030

Urgestein

6,385 Kommentare 924 Likes

Schade das der 5600x wieder mit Übertaktung läuft,im Work und Produktiveinsatz wird ja selten der Ram Übertaktet und da bleibt die CPU sparsamer bei gleicher Leistung.

Antwort Gefällt mir

R
Rooter

Mitglied

12 Kommentare 3 Likes

So viel zum stromschluckenden und ineffizienten Golden Cove. Es kommt eben ganz auf die Taktraten an. Ja bei 5 Ghz ist Golden Cove förmlich der Stromfresser und der 5950x viel effizienter. Nur vergessen die Leute, dass der 5950x dank seiner 16 big Kerne und 32 threads mit nur etwa 4 Ghz bei voller Auslastung läuft, was nun einmal für die Effizienz sehr förderlich ist.

Und siehe da, taktet Golden Cove mit nur 4.0 Ghz, ist er genauso effizient bzw. hier effizienter. Die Architektur ist nicht automatisch ineffizient nur weil das Topmodell Strom säuft bei 5 Ghz. Im übrigen ist das hier ein 12400 vom C0 stepping, die 12400 im H0 stepping vom nativen 6+0 Die sind noch ein wenig effizienter.

Antwort Gefällt mir

p
peru3232

Mitglied

18 Kommentare 4 Likes

vor allem sieht man auch, wie "wichtig" die Effizenzkerne sind -> sind diese NICHT vorhanden, steigt die Effizienz spührbar an... well done, Intel 🤪

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

Format©

6,188 Kommentare 9,730 Likes

Mit DDR4 3200 siehts nicht anders aus. Langsamer aber kaum sparsamer. Und die TDP auf 65 Watt festzutackern bringt auch nichts. Wir sind ja faktisch fast immer drunter.

Antwort 1 Like

Casi030

Urgestein

6,385 Kommentare 924 Likes

Ist das denn so anders beim 5600x mit dem SOC?
Selbst der 5950x verbraucht mit 4x8GB Ram bei 3200MHz nur 8Watt,mit 3266MHz sind es 10Watt mehr auf dem SOC was mehr Verbrauch bedeutet und schnellere Begrenzung bei PPT/TDC/EDC.

View image at the forums

So mit 3266MHz

View image at the forums

Antwort Gefällt mir

Alkbert

Urgestein

595 Kommentare 328 Likes

Bei AutoCAD und den entsprechenden Derivaten scheint eine ausgeprägte Parallelisierung eher nicht oben auf der Prioritätsliste zu stehen, sonst wäre der 5950 nicht permanent langsamer als der 5900er. Und wenn wir dann schon im Produktivität und - Workstation Segment sind und ich mir mal die Systeme von befreundeten Statikern, Bauingenieuren und Architekten anschaue, wo massiv auf Multi-Kern CPU´s gesetzt wird (da ist 16 eher das absolute Minimum), dann hinterfrage ich den Sinn solcher Systeme schon nachhaltig.
Schaut man sich - auch die Produktivitätsbenchmarks - von vor einem guten Jahr an, dann waren da gefühlt teils "kleine Welten" zwischen dem 12 und 16 Kerner und dann nochmals zu den sTRX Systemen. Offensichtlich hat man hier aber eher "much ado about nothing", frei nach Shakespeare.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
R
Rooter

Mitglied

12 Kommentare 3 Likes

Es zeigt sich genau das, was wir schon wussten. Die E cores sind nicht performance/W steigernd, sondern sind die hauptsächlich als Multithread Booster zu verstehen, Stichwort Flächeneffizienz. Intel kann kostengünstiger die MT Leistung steigern.

Und zukünftig hat es vielleicht den Vorteil das sie nicht mehr so einen großen tradeoff bei der Core Architektur eingehen müssen zwischen performance, Verbrauch und Flächenbedarf.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

Format©

6,188 Kommentare 9,730 Likes

Wenn man nicht gerade rendert oder sich totrechnet, bringt eine schnelle Workstation-GPU zusammen mit schnellen 6-8 Kernen mehr als ein Threadripper. Kanonen, Spatzen und so.

AutoCAD und Parallelisierung... Da ist nichts. Ein paar Ad-Ons vielleicht oder eine längere Simu, aber normalerweise klebt AutoCAD an der IPC. Da kommts auch auf den Takt an. Gerade 2D geht voll durch den Treiber und der ballert die CPU zu.

Antwort 3 Likes

LeovonBastler

Mitglied

31 Kommentare 7 Likes

Mich wundert es aber, warum manchmal mit der CPU und nicht mit der GPU gerendert wird. Hat es einen speziellen Grund?
Genau das Gleiche frage ich mich auch, wenn man eine Menge an Nummern crunchen will (ist auch Teil vom rendern). Klar, gibt es Instruktionen (wie x86, AVX usw.), welche die GPU vom Featureset her nicht unterstützt aber ausserhalb von dem wundert's mich manchmal schon...

Ich kenne mich aber in dem Bereich überhaupt nicht aus und arbeite auch nicht dort, daher sind meine Fragen und Angaben gegebenfalls falsch.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Advertising

Advertising