Audio Audio/Peripherals Headsets Reviews

Sharkoon Skiller SGH50 headset Review – Hammer-hard punch meets good sound and a decent microphone – Combat announcement for under 60 Euros

Disclaimer: The following article is machine translated from the original German, and has not been edited or checked for errors. Thank you for understanding!

The Sharkoon Skiller SGH50 for currently 57 Euros was not only a surprise for me, so that I took the opportunity to test it myself this time. Because what you hear and how you judge is all well and good, but also always somewhat subjective. However, if you want to write about a game changer in the under 60 euro class, you should also be able to prove something like that with measurements. Why am I going so far out on a limb here? It’s the first headset that even nibbled my Tesla headphones and a Planar when it comes to level stability and sound pressure. Can’t do it? Yes, it can!

Of course, where the light shines so brightly, there is always more or less shadow. However, this is surprisingly restrained in the SGH50, even though the price pressure is of course quite noticeable in many details. However, most of it is quite well concealed and few gamers will notice it right away. If at all. Everything done right? A resounding yes, even though there is one small thing that bothers me subjectively, but it is also an intended feature. But more about that later, because I not only unpacked the headset and evaluated its sound, but also measured it in detail and then completely disassembled it. I was also very interested in the inner values. Logical.

I actually wanted to test the headset much sooner, but then preferred to get two other opinions after a first hands-on. Each with its own retail product, so that I can be sure that I’m not holding a golden sample in my hand. But enough of the euphoric introduction, because what really counts in the end with the customer are the soft and the hard facts. And that’s exactly what I’m starting to do now.

Scope of delivery

The 55-ohm headset is packaged in recyclable cardboard without a microphone, which is available as a detachable component with a pop protector. And if you’re wondering what the small, black rubber part to the left of the pop shield is: it’s a small cover for the lower microphone port, in case you want to use the part as pure headphones and so that the jack doesn’t get dirty then.

And what else? There is the original 3.5 mm TRSS jack cable for the headphone jack including cable remote (volume, mute) with 110 cm length, a 150 cm extension and a Y-splitter from TRSS to single 3.5 mm jacks for audio and mic. Besides the quick instructions, there is some air filled in Asia and that’s it. But it’s quite enough, because that’s all you need. Let’s first take a look at the 360° flight around the SGH50 without a microphone as a pure headphone variant:

 

Appearance, feel and wearing comfort

For just under 60 Euros, you get quite solid fare in terms of material selection and design. It doesn’t look like a plastic bomber at first glance, nor do metal temples and stitched PU leather give off the cheap whiff of the usual cost-down contortions. Yes, some things just don’t work for this price if you install proper chassis. But then rather no RGB, but proper drivers. They got their priorities completely right.

Overall, the implementation leaves a decent impression, also because the headset completely lacks the usual gaming attitudes. Without the microphone, the part would also pass as a decent stereo headphone and I have already tested many pure headphones that sounded worse and yet cost more. Of course, the part is no lightweight anymore with its 342 grams, but it is not yet a sumo wrestler on an acoustic errand either. So for a high-performance over-ear headset with a fairly massive boom construction, this is acceptable.

 

The joint mechanism is simple, due to the price, but still functional. Only one axis, but a very flexible headband and the somewhat yielding metal bracket are of course already enough in total, so that you can adjust the shells properly to the ear. For me as a wearer with a hat size of 64, this is still perfectly fine, where other headsets are already very tight. Only users with a hat size of 56 and smaller should refrain from a dignified headbang if possible, otherwise the part will rise into orbit.

Even I don’t feel any pressure, especially since the headband, which can be pulled out far enough, sits well in the headband and you don’t miss a clearly defined click mechanism of any kind. This one is one-size, making it suitable for North America and Europe.

The cow, from whose petroleum fur the soft imitation leather of the temple pad and that of the two removable ear pads was cut, unfortunately only got to eat pure polyurethane in its short laboratory life. That closes reasonably soft, but not too soft and tight, so that after prolonged wear you will miss the very special microclimate of the usual lard stoves (not really). More about this in the teardown. But as nice as the soft foam may be for pressure point rehab, it is somewhat detrimental to the sound when the listener is pressed too close to the ear. I can only advise everyone to attentively optimize the seat with the sound source running, so that the bass does not become a banger.

There is not much more to say about the headset, at least not on the outside, except that you can be quite happy with this part and you hardly feel the price pressure. I’ll come to the plug-in microphone in more detail later. The headset is connected with the aforementioned TRSS cable and remote control, whose volume control is not particularly synchronous in the initial range and the fiddly mute button, which does not really make a durable impression and is also much too stiff. If there has been one real criticism so far, it is this piece. Simply do not use and then it will also work with the long-term durability. Knobs are overrated anyway.

As a conclusion of this chapter, I also have the technical data for you, which I won’t recite individually now, but simply take over as an overview. Some of this I will measure and check later:

And since we’re so busy documenting, I also have the manual for you, before I crack the headphones on the next page and the teardown is allowed to expose the inner values.

mn_Skiller-SGH50_int_01

Sharkoon Skiller SGH50 schwarz

office-partner.deAuf Lager, sofort versandfertig Lieferzeit 1-2 Werktage46,50 €*Stand: 19.05.24 22:30
playox.deAuf Lager, sofort versandfertig Lieferzeit 1-2 Werktage46,50 €*Stand: 18.05.24 12:26
nullprozentshop.desiehe Shop46,99 €*Stand: 20.05.24 01:00
*Alle Preise inkl. gesetzl. MwSt zzgl. Versandkosten und ggf. Nachnahmegebühren, wenn nicht anders beschriebenmit freundlicher Unterstützung von geizhals.de

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

Lucky Luke

Veteran

406 Kommentare 181 Likes

Igor, danke für den Test.
Habe schon immer nach einem preiswerten Headset gesucht.
Was will ich sagen, wird sofort bestellt. Für mich als Gelegenheitsanwender absolut ausreichend (y)
Hier kann man wirklich sagen "Preis/Leistung" perfekt getroffen.

Antwort 2 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,276 Kommentare 19,019 Likes

Das ist sowas von verboten laut... Die ganzen Spielkinder werden es lieben. Nicht. Denn es hat kein RGB. :D

Antwort 6 Likes

w
wahli

Neuling

2 Kommentare 1 Likes

Toller, hervorragend geschriebener Bericht. Mir gefällt dein Stil - fast wie bei einem Buch. Du hattest sicherlich einen Einser in Deutsch :)
Endlich mal ein interessantes und vor allem bezahlbares Headset.

Antwort 1 Like

Lucky Luke

Veteran

406 Kommentare 181 Likes

Die Leistung muss passen.
RGB ist zwar nett, aber kann ich getrost drauf verzichten, wenn das Geld dafür beim Hersteller lieber in die Performancesparte verschoben wird 👍

Antwort 1 Like

R
RienSte

Mitglied

31 Kommentare 44 Likes

Schöner Test, danke dafür. Bin auch schon länger auf der Suche nach einem guten Headset in dem Preisbereich.

Eine Frage noch... könntet ihr euch in Kombination mit dem Headset evtl. den Sharkoon Gaming DAC Pro S V2 anschauen? Hintergrund ist, dass ich bisher noch kein Mainboard hatte, wo am Front Audio nicht irgendwelche Störgeräusche waren. Aktuell habe ich daher ein USB Voip Headset in Verwendung mit allen Einschränkung, die so eine Lösung mit sich bringt (mäßiger Komfort, Musik darüber ist grausam, keine Dämmung nach außen, Mikro dafür sehr gut).

Das SGH50 + DAC Pro S V2 klingt nach einer Möglichkeit ein solides Headset per USB anzusteuern für unter 100€.

Vielen Dank.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Blubbie

Urgestein

808 Kommentare 275 Likes

boah das Mikro klingt ja echt gut!
Wieso gibts sowas nicht auch als Wireless???? Gefühlt fangen die brauchbaren Wireless dann immer erst bei 200+ EUR an... das kann doch nicht so teuer sein?!?!?

Antwort Gefällt mir

B
Besterino

Urgestein

6,799 Kommentare 3,385 Likes

Direkt mal bestellt. Schönen Gruß an die Sharkoon Marketingabteilung: nur wegen des Tests hier! :P

Antwort 2 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,276 Kommentare 19,019 Likes

Ich habs logischerweise auch getestet und das Mikro kling exakt so gut, wie hier im Test. Generell ist der Klang auch am DAC sauber und mir haben die Ohren wirklich weh getan, so viel Pegel kommt da rüber. Kleiner Nachteil: das Headset ist wirklich sehr empfindlich, so dass man vom DAC ein leichtes (aber wirklich nur minimales) Rauschen hört. Also wenn man nicht im schallgebremsten Raum sitzt und das Headset als Ohrenwärmer ohne Input nutzt, wird es kaum stören. Man hört es aber selbst bei Pausen zwischen den Musikstücken irgendwann gar nicht mehr. Wenn der DAC, dann aber die Pro V2.

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,276 Kommentare 19,019 Likes

Ich habe leider keine Affiliate Links :D

Antwort 1 Like

B
Besterino

Urgestein

6,799 Kommentare 3,385 Likes

Na drum musste ich das ja auch ausdrücklich hier reinschreiben. :D

Kannst Du nicht bei Gelegenheit auch mal bei Cherry anrufen? Ich hätte immer noch gerne eine Stream mit nkey rollover und anti-ghosting... wenn's geht auch noch dezent beleuchtet (weiß reicht), das wäre aber verzichtbar...

Sorry für OT.

Antwort Gefällt mir

G
Guest

Interessant. Vielleicht auch als 2. Headset oder so.
Die für mich wichtigste Frage ist jedoch: geschlossene Kopfhörer oder offen? Sieht mir ja nach geschlossen aus. Das geht bei mir leider gar nicht, ich mag den Ohrdruck & co nicht :( .
Aber der Preis scheint heiss.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,276 Kommentare 19,019 Likes

Geschlossen, das steht doch im Kapitel mit den Ohrpolstern. Stichwort Mikroklima ;)

Antwort Gefällt mir

RedF

Urgestein

4,710 Kommentare 2,587 Likes

Ich hab das mir dem RGB am Headset nicht verstanden.
Man sieht das doch selber garnicht.
( mein Nachwuchs war da anderer meinung )

Antwort 3 Likes

G
Guest

Hui, wieso habe ich es mir nur fast gedacht dass das eben dieses Headset ist. 😁

Bei dem kleinen Teaser letztens kam mir direkt Sharkoon in den Sinn, die gerade was Audio angeht in den letzten Jahren ne Kurve hingelegt haben das es nicht mehr feierlich ist.

Wollte ich mir auch vor einigen Wochen erst holen, ist dann aber ein G435 Lightspeed geworden - klingt nicht so gut, weder KH als auch Mikro - aber ich wollte auch mal Wireless haben und das Teil ist dazu noch irre leicht.

Für Frau deren Noontec sich mittlerweile auflösen aber richtig gut - lieben Dank für die Bestätigung. 👍🏼

LG Marti

Antwort 1 Like

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,543 Kommentare 876 Likes

Danke Igor! Den sehe ich mir gleich Mal näher an; die Kaufempfehlung von Dir als langjährigen Audiophilen hat da schon Gewicht.

Antwort 1 Like

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,543 Kommentare 876 Likes

Ich sehe auch sehr wenig mit meinen Ohren😃; aber im Ernst, ich verstehe die ganze Bling Manie sowieso kaum. Lieber ein paar Cent mehr in die Membranen und Magneten stecken, da höre ich es auch. Oder etwas mehr Nylon oder Kevlar in die Strippe, damit die besser hält.

Antwort 2 Likes

Ghoster52

Urgestein

1,430 Kommentare 1,093 Likes

Danke für den Test! (y)
Ich mag diese Bügelkonstruktion (kennt man ja von AKG & Superlux), ein normaler Beyer-Bügel kann schon mal drücken.
Zum Frequenzverlauf, eine Senke nach 1kHz wäre optimaler, aber keine Pflicht.
Beim 5 kHz Buckel hört man das Gras wachsen, mit etwas EQ leicht in den Griff zu bekommen.

Antwort 2 Likes

FritzHunter01

Moderator

1,159 Kommentare 1,575 Likes

An der Stelle muss ich mich auch mal zu Wort melden. Ich bin zwar bei weitem nicht so audio-affin wie Igor, aber dennoch kann ich mittlerweile differenziert hinhören.

Wer dieses SGH50 kauft, der wird in keiner Weise enttäuscht! Ich selbst durfte ein Exemplar seit ein paar Tagen testen und was soll ich sagen, es hat sofort überzeugt.

Da ich im Besitz des SGH1, des SGH3 und des Sennheiser GSP 670 bin, kann ich sogar Vergleiche heranzuziehen. Mögen diese auch einen gewissen subjektiven Mitschwinger haben.

Bei meinen Tests kam sowohl der Onboard ALC1220, die Soundblaster AE-5 Plus, der verbaute Soundchip im ASUS ROG Throne und DAC Pro S von Sharkoon zum Einsatz. Das SGH50 lässt hier den „Vorgänger“ das SGH3 mit deutlichem Abstand zurück. Das SGH1 sieht gar kein Land und dem GSP 670 kommt das SGH50 sehr nahe! Was die Pegelfestigkeit bzw. auch maximale Lautstärke angeht, kann hier das 350 € Sennheiser nicht mithalten!

Das Sennheiser ist aber im Bereich der Mitten und beim differenzieren (im Gaming-Profil mit virtuellem 7.1) etwas besser. So zumindest nach meinem Gehör!

Im direkten Vergleich zum SGH3 ist das SGH50 wie ein Upgrade vom Trabant auf einen Ferrari…

Vor allem was die Lautstärke und die gesamte Klangbreite betrifft. Das SGH3 ist die typische Badewanne mit untenrum viel Bass und obenraus nochmal viel Höhe. Hier überzeugt das SGH50 auf ganzer Line!

Ich beschreibe es mal so, ich es live erlebt habe:

Mit meiner Standardeinstellung der AE-5 Plus bei ca 85% der max Lautstärke, habe ich das SGH3 durch das SGH50 ersetzt und einen meiner Test-Songs nochmal laufen lassen.

Das ging ein paar Sekunden und dann habe ich mir das SGH50 vom Kopf gerissen, da es mir sonst die Batterien aus dem Schrittmacher gehauen hätte! Erstmal die Lautstärke runterdrehen…

Egal an welchem Soundausgang man das SGH50 nutzt, es ist einfach gut… selbst am Apfel-Telefon (mit lightning Adapter auf 3,5 Klinke) geht da noch richtig die Post ab. Noise-Canceling my ass! Das geht auch so im Flieger, da es ein geschlossenes Headset ist und richtig Volumen auf den Ohren ankommt.

Für nicht mal 60 € ist das SGH50 die Überraschung des Jahres, wobei das Jahr noch nicht mal richtig angefangen hat. Da muss der Wettbewerb sich warm anziehen!

Auch von meiner Seite eine absolute Kaufempfehlung! Für mich ein Must-Have

Wer auf billigen Soundchips (Laptop bzw alles unter ALC1220) unterwegs ist, der sollte unbedingt die 30 € für Sharkoon DAC Pro S ausgeben, denn sonst kommt ihr nicht mal in die Nähe der Schmerzgrenze eures Gehörs. Der ALC1220 geht mit 100% noch auszuhalten. Der DAC Pro S ist mit dem SGH50 bereits Körperverletzung!

Grüße Fritz

PS: ich nutze das Headset täglich und werde am Ende des Jahres nochmal einen kurzen Wasserstand zur Dauerfestigkeit der Materialien usw. an euch melden!

Antwort 9 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
G
Guest

So, hab mir das Teil samt DAC (Pro V2) von Sharkoon (danke @FritzHunter01 und @Igor Wallossek) auch mal raus gelassen. Wollte schon die ganze Zeit ein brauchbares Headset, vor allem für einen guten Audiosound. Werde es wohl auch hauptsächlich zum Hören nutzen, da ich keine Multiplayer spiele. Gut also, dass das Mikro abnehmbar ist und eine passende Verschlusskappe auch noch bei liegt.
Bei der Empfehlung sollte man zuschlagen, bevor es sich herum gesprochen hat und die Händler wieder ein paar Extra-Euronen abgreifen wollen.
Werde dann natürlich auch mal einen kurzen Bericht abgeben.

Antwort 2 Likes

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung