DDR-RAM Editor's Desk Reviews System

Moody IMCs, beware! – Corsair Dominator Titanium RGB DDR5-8000 2x 24 GB Review with Overclocking and Teardown

A test is always particularly exciting when you come across unexpected problems for which the test subject is not actually responsible. This was also the case here. A RAM test, even if it’s a rather high-priced kit, now runs according to the same pattern for me and isn’t witchcraft. But this time I found myself trapped in an almost supernatural spell from which there was a way out: testing, trying and tinkering for weeks on end.

Today we’re actually going to talk about the new Dominator Titanium RGB modules from Corsair, specifically the 2x 24 GB version with an XMP profile of DDR5-8000 at CL38 and 1.40V. But today we also have to deal with a problem that buyers of such RAM kits will have to deal with themselves sooner rather than later. And also because there are often misleading statements and screenshots in the relevant forums, I would like to explain this in detail today from my perspective. But first to the unboxing of the kit.

Unboxing and design

With the Dominator Titanium series, Corsair has introduced another offshoot of the long-established Dominator series. The Titanium kits differ mainly in their new, modular design from the older Dominator Platinum series, which has also been retained for the time being. The Titanium series SKUs range from 2 x 16 GB to 2 x 48 GB, from DDR5-6000 to DDR5-8000 and are available in AMD EXPO and Intel XMP versions. Corsair sent us the high-end version CMP48GX5M2X8000C38 for testing.

The packaging is simple and high quality. The box is matt and only the RAM modules on the front have a reflective print, creating a nice 3D effect. To the back: Of course, the modules are compatible with Corsair’s iCUE RGB software and the specified clock rate of 8000 Mbps is to be achieved using Intel XMP. We also find the serial numbers of the modules, the capacity of 2x 24 GB and the complete XMP profile of 8000 MT/s at timings 38-48-48-98 and 1.40 V. Even if it is not explicitly mentioned on the back, Corsair covers the modules with a “Limited Lifetime Warranty”.

Inside the box are the 2 modules, each in a plastic carrier frame, and as always a small pamphlet with safety instructions. Embedded all around in soft black foam, the modules should survive transportation with even the roughest parcel service. Incidentally, this kit is not the “First Edition”, which would have included an additional set of heatsinks and a screwdriver.

When you first look at the modules, you immediately notice that they consist of two components. The lower two thirds are the actual RAM module with circuit board, memory chips and a heat sink made of black anodized aluminium. At the top is another element made of black painted aluminum with two long slots through which the lighting element shines. The upper element can be removed completely, replaced by an accessory cooler without lighting or even designed completely by yourself using 3D printing. Corsair makes the CAD file for this available for download on its website – that’s really cool!

There is currently only one official replacement cooler available, directly from Corsair for 39 euros per pair, but there may soon be alternatives from third-party manufacturers. For all those who want to remove the upper part completely and operate the RAM in “low profile” mode, a simple cover would have been a nice addition.

 

Both sides of the cooler bear a Corsair logo and “DOMINATOR TITANIUM”, as well as a vertical “//DHX” imprint, with the latter denoting Corsair’s cooler design. In the center below the “TITANIUM” inscription, there is a “DDR5” imprint on one side and, of course, the sticker with a barcode, test mark and the specifications including the XMP profile on the other side. As is typical for Corsair, the “version” of the modules is also indicated here, from which the manufacturer of the memory modules can be derived, “ver 5.53.13”. 5 probably stands for SK Hynix, 53 for 24 Gbit modules (cf. 43 for 16 Gbit) and 13 for the 13th letter in the alphabet, i.e. M, and therefore “M-The” memory ICs.

This already gives us an indication that we are dealing with SK Hynix 24 Gbit M-Die and that the modules, each with a capacity of 24 GB, should consist of one rank. Even if the capacity of 24 GB may seem strange at first, it is simply a fully-fledged intermediate step between 16 and 32 and not a “dual-rank hybrid” construct, as one might think.

If you look from above, you can see the 2 screws that connect the upper light element to the actual RAM module. Embedded in the black aluminum is an acrylic window with DOMINATOR lettering, which naturally lights up during operation. The transition from aluminum to acrylic is completely seamless, and not even the slightest edge can be felt – elegant engineering!

The two-part structure of the Dominator Titantium modules can be clearly seen from the side. The lower part consists of an aluminum-PCB-aluminum sandwich, as is now the case with almost every RAM module. Both aluminum halves are attached with adhesive thermal pads and a foam placeholder is used on the PCB side without ICs instead. The two aluminum halves virtually hug the board, leaving only the lower third free for the hooks of the DIMM slot. Unfortunately, it is noticeable that the two aluminium halves are not quite the same shade of black and the side with the specification sticker is slightly lighter when anodized. You can only see this at second or third glance, but for all nerds with OCD, this could be unattractive and so I don’t want to leave it unmentioned.

The heatsink sandwich and the single-sided assembly of the board with 8 RAM ICs each can be seen from below.

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,339 Likes

Schöner Test,ist denn auch mal eine Optimierung von dir geplant die solch einem Kit?

Antwort 2 Likes

big-maec

Urgestein

897 Kommentare 533 Likes

Jetzt wäre es auch mal interessant, die Instabilität mal messtechnisch zu überprüfen, wie die Signale auf dem Bussystem grundlegend so aussehen. Vielleicht sieht man auch an den Signalen noch einen Unterschied zwischen Intel und AMD.

Antwort 1 Like

p
pintie

Veteran

185 Kommentare 133 Likes

wo liegt denn aktuell die Grenze des Sinnvollen wenn man 4 DIMMs verwenden will.
(AM5, X670E, 7950X3D).
ich kann die 4x48GB brauchen...

Antwort 1 Like

Roland83

Urgestein

706 Kommentare 548 Likes

ich betreibe 4x16 Single Rank bei 5800Mhz mit dem 7800X3D. Aber so pauschal kann man das immer schwer sagen weil extrem viel hinein spielt und 4x16 wird sich vermutlich auch nicht 1:1 auf 4x48 umlegen lassen....
Wo die Grenze des sinnvollen liegt ist halt immer eine Anwendungsfrage... ich persönliche sehe bei mir absolut keinen Bedarf für mehr als 64GB, aber das mag in gewissen Anwendungsfällen natürlich anders aussehen ...

Antwort Gefällt mir

p
pintie

Veteran

185 Kommentare 133 Likes

4x48GB laufen bei 5200MHz stabil auf dem Board. (Corsair Vengeance DDR5-5600 )

Frage ist ob da mehr geht und ob man es überhaupt merkt.
geht nicht ums zocken, sondern 3D berechnungen und cad Anwendungen die 192GB RAm komplett voll machen...

Antwort 1 Like

skullbringer

Veteran

306 Kommentare 329 Likes

Quad Rank auf AMD habe ich noch nicht probiert. AMD gibt offiziell DDR5-3600 an und an die "optimalen" 6000 wirst du höchstwarhscheinlich nicht ran kommen.

Hilft glaube ich nur trial and error, oder eben einfach 3600 jedec laufen lassen :/

Antwort Gefällt mir

skullbringer

Veteran

306 Kommentare 329 Likes

Wenn man das Equipment und Wissen hätte, um solche Analysen zu fahren, würde man man schon bei Intel oder Corsair arbeiten...

Alleine für ein Oszilloskop für diesen Frequenzbereich bekommste nen Kleinwagen :D

Antwort 2 Likes

Roland83

Urgestein

706 Kommentare 548 Likes

Bei professionellen speicherintensiven Anwendungen merke ich im Gegensatz zu Gaming einen deutlichen Unterschied was den Speichertakt angeht am X3D.
Zumindest im Vergleich von 3600 zu 5600.
Aber auch wenn ich dann das Auge nicht mehr so drauf gelegt habe wird der Unterschied dann natürlich deutlich kleiner was die Sprünge über 5000Mhz angeht... Vielleicht könnte man bei 8000 wieder deutlicher profitieren nur das wird man nicht erreichen.
Ich habe auch schon 6000 Mhz oder etwas mehr im Quad Channel auf AM5 gesehen, aber da wird sich der Mehrwert dann vermutlich zu 5200 eher in Grenzen halten. Und dann ist halt die Frage kann man die Verbindung zur CPU mit dem vollen Takt aufrecht erhalten oder kippt er in einen Teiler, wirkt sich das vielleicht sogar wieder negativer aus je nach Anwendung...
Extrem Aufwändig, ich würde sagen mit 5200 bist du nicht schlecht dabei :)

Antwort 1 Like

Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,339 Likes

Genau das ist die Frage der Optimierung.
6000er oder 6400er Kit Optimiert auf z.b.5600MHz.
Geringere Timings, geringere Spannungen was auch den Speichercontroller weniger belastet.......
Wieviel Unterschied macht dann ein 7200er oder 8000er Kit aus bei den 5600MHz bei den Timings und Spannungen.
Ist der Unterschied groß durch die besseren Chips und ist der Aufpreis gerechtfertigt?
Ändert sich überhaupt etwas in Anwendungen und Rennspielen beim X3D?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Roland83

Urgestein

706 Kommentare 548 Likes

Beim spielen kann man mit dem 3D Cache auch bei 3600Mhz und ECO Spannung glücklich werden ... Bei Anwendungen sieht es teilweise ganz anders aus, da kann auch schon ein etwas aufwändigeres Photoshop Projekt reichen das man deutliche Unterschiede sieht wenn man sich in Richtung Architektur Sweetspot bewegt.
Die Qualität der Riegel spielt sicher eine Rolle, weil es natürlich einen Unterschied macht ob ich mich bei 1.3x bewege oder 1.4 anlegen muss (Was bei Quadchannel mit DDR5 4800 respektive Expo 6000 nicht selten der Fall ist) und natürlich auch gravierenden Einfluss auf die Timings hat.
Aber bei so speziellen Anwendungsfällen muss man das halt wie gesagt eh immer individuell mit Blick auf die eigenen Komponeten ausvalidieren ob sich das lohnt oder nicht, da wird man schwer breite Beispiele oder Erfahrungswerte finden.

Ich persönlich suche halt immer das stabile Maxmimum und gehe dann 200 MHZ runter. Weil ich eben auch nicht nur zocke und mir der Popo auf Grundeis geht wenn er nach 3 vermeintlich "stabilen" Wochen dann vielleicht doch die Grätsche macht weil mans übertrieben hat und das 3 Wochen Cloud CAD Projekt eventuell geschrottet ist xD
Das sollte man dann auch noch am Horizont haben ;)

Antwort 3 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,339 Likes

Das stimmt,nur was braucht man wirklich,Bandbreite oder bessere Timings in den Anwendungen?
Ein 8 Kerner hat deutlich weniger Leistung als ein 16Kerner,8 Kerne mit besseren Timings und 16Kerne mit mehr Bandbreite?!
Die Ramspannung allein ist ja auch nicht mehr entscheidend,da hast ja noch ein paar mehr wie auch die SOC Spannung.
Ein gesunder Mix aus JEDED und EXPO bei den Spannungen mit geringen Timings sollte gar nicht so schlecht Abschneiden.

Antwort Gefällt mir

c
carrera

Mitglied

96 Kommentare 63 Likes

Vielen Dank @skullbringer für diesen wertvollen Test.

Mir war gar nicht (mehr) bewusst, dass der IMC der CPU eine so entscheidende Rolle spielt; auch das sich wiederholende “Trainieren“ ist für mich ein Erkenntnisgewinn aus diesem Review. Früher war ja mal die Steuerung der RAM-Riegel im Chipsatz des Boards verortet…

Frage an die Wissenden … ist dieses “Training“ ein Feature aller CPUs mit IMC oder wurde das erst mit einer späteren CPU-Generation eingeführt? Vielen Dank

Antwort 1 Like

Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,339 Likes

Deswegen teste ich immer mit -25mV weniger und/oder mehr Takt. ;)

Antwort Gefällt mir

c
carrera

Mitglied

96 Kommentare 63 Likes

vermutlich beides …
nach meinem Verständnis führen höhere Bandbreite der RAM-Riegel in Verbindung mit engerem Timings (und ggf. mehr Speicherkanälen) zu höherem Speicherdurchsatz des Rechners … und profitiert davon nicht jede Anwendung? Ich bilde mir ja ein, ein PC ist „more responsive“ wenn der Speicherdurchsatz höher ist …

Antwort 2 Likes

Roland83

Urgestein

706 Kommentare 548 Likes

das ist korrekt, wobei die SOC Spannung hier bei AM5 wieder so eine Sache ist... Grundlegend muss ich hier einfach von EXPO abraten.
Denn meiner läuft auf einer Quad Konfiguration mit 1.025 SOC und durchschnittlichem DDR5 hervorragend und dort bewegen sich auch alle anderen AM5 Konfigs die ich bisher zusammengeschustert habe.
Mir ist natürlich klar das man hier darauf abzielt das es mit höchster Warhscheinlichkeit in jeder erdenklichen Kombi an Hardwaregüte funktionieren soll und der User das einfach kaufen, einbaue, einstellen muss. Aber..., dass ist alles far away von notwendig oder optimal.

Und weil ich gerade das more responsive lese, ja das unterschreibe ich so gerne.
Eine optimale Speicherkonfiguration auf einem durchdachten System mit von mir aus noch einer pcie nvme ssd (egal ob 3,4,5) führt immer zu einer gesteigeten Reaktivität beim arbeiten mit dem System. Da gehts schon um einfache Dinge wie das öffnen von Fenstern im OS, Tabs wechseln, zwischen Anwendungen switchen.. Aber dafür muss man es auch nicht übertreiben (da werden auch 5200Mhz reichen), ganz im Gegenteil kann das wenn man irgendwann "drüber" ist auch wieder ins negative bewegen und man gewinnt mit einzelnen Wunderbenchmarks natürlich nichts. Und das trifft natürlich gleichermaßen auf AM4, AM5, X3d oder nicht zu.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
big-maec

Urgestein

897 Kommentare 533 Likes

Fände das mal interessant zu wissen, wie so ein Messaufbau überhaupt aussieht und was real so möglich wäre.
Vielleicht gibt es einen Hersteller, der mal Einblicke gewährt in die Messtechnik.

Antwort 1 Like

skullbringer

Veteran

306 Kommentare 329 Likes

RAM Training machen meines Wissens nach alle CPUs mit IMC oder generell jede Art von Speichercontroller. Mit zunehmender Takt- und Datenrate wurde das Training mit der Zeit immer komplexer und bei DDR4 hat man dann soweit ich weiß zum ersten mal "MRC Fastboot" eingeführt, damit das nicht bei jedem Systemstart Zeit frisst.

Ganz extrem sieht man es bei den aktuellen Ryzen 7000 CPUs, die mit einem Quad-Rank Setup gleich mehrere Minuten brauchen zum trainieren - man erinnert sich vielleicht an die Aufkleber, die Asrock deswegen auf ihre X670 Mainboards geklebt hatte, die dann nicht rückstandsfrei abgingen :D

Die "Stimmungsschwankungen" im Training Ergebnis gabs bei Intel übrigens auch schon bei DDR4, nur dass es da noch nicht die Stabilität betroffen hat, sondern "nur" die RTL/IOL Werte und damit die effektiven Latenzen.

Antwort 2 Likes

Roland83

Urgestein

706 Kommentare 548 Likes

ja die hat man dann auch gleich wieder abgeschafft, auf meinem Taichi war schon keiner mehr drauf.
Aber ich verstehe es schon, denn es gibt genügend die den Rechner nervös wieder zerlegen wenn nach 2 MInuten immer noch der Bildschirm schwarz ist.... Und sich da vorher gezielt zu informieren wenn man vielleicht noch jahrelange Erfahrung im PC Bau Bereich hat oder read the fucking manual fällt uns halt nun mal allen schwer.

Antwort 3 Likes

Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,339 Likes

Da hast ja schon den Unterschied zwischen Single und Dualranked.
Bis jetzt hab ich immer nur Ram Übertaktet, sprich z.b. 3000-3600MHz gekauft und bis 4000MHz+ hoch gezogen da hast nen kleinen Unterschied bei den Chips gemerkt und auch nach Unten bei den Timings. Nur ob ich die jetzt mit hohen Spannungen (also max Standard) oder mit weniger Spannung, Timings und auf 3200MHz belasse macht in meinen Anwendungen und Spielen keinen gravierenden Unterschied.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Xaver Amberger (skullbringer)

Werbung

Werbung