CPU Gaming Graphics Practice Reviews System

Intel Alder Lake: Gaming Performance Benchmarks – Why an AMD Radeon RX 6900XT makes more sense instead of an NVIDIA RTX A6000 or GeForce RTX 3090

Disclaimer: The following article is machine translated from the original German, and has not been edited or checked for errors. Thank you for understanding!

Sure, the full-size GA102, especially overclocked and well cooled, is really fast. It is a card that is in no way inferior to a normal GeForce RTX 3090 in terms of gaming performance, but is much more efficient. But for CPU tests in the CPU bound (“bottleneck”) with resolutions from 1080p downwards, not only the chip and the theoretical performance have to be considered, but all circumstances up to the driver. If Intel’s Alder Lake CPUs, especially the flagship in the form of the Core i9-12900K(F), should really be as fast as they are rumored to be (I’m deliberately playing dumb here, even though I don’t have to), then the absolute fastest graphics card in the sum of hardware and software would just be good enough.

The practical value of testing with a screen resolution of 1280 x 720 pixels (“720p”) is debatable, but there are plausible arguments for doing so, even if no one with high-end or enthusiast hardware will ever seriously use such postage stamp resolutions. It’s just that the CPU is almost always limited by the graphics card (GPU bound) in higher resolutions and better settings and therefore doesn’t play the most important role. But most users are still stuck with 1440p and 1080p today, partly because of the all-important high FPS numbers in common shooters. And besides, maybe today’s 720p is the CPU benchmark for tomorrow’s 1080p.

Intel has naturally chosen the smallest resolution of 1920 x 1080 pixels (“1080p”) in its own manufacturer slides for exactly this reason, which certainly corresponds to the logic of the CPU bounds to be checked. In contrast, however, I’ll be testing 10 well-balanced games in a total of four resolutions from Ultra HD (“2160p”) all the way down to 720p in great detail, because the ultimate goal is to satisfy both parts of the readership, even those who can’t do anything with 720p to begin with. The fact that there weren’t 11 games (as planned) is due to the annoying problem of the DRM mechanisms, which have their problems with the new CPU. Intel will have to improve this as quickly as possible (which they are currently doing frantically). Denuvo once again turns out to be a plague that can’t cope with the separation into E- and P-Cores.

Speaking of Intel slides, you also have to include an important side note here about the testing methodology that pissed me off a bit. Yes, I too will be testing exclusively on Windows 11 for good reasons, because using ADL is not fun on Windows 10, nor could you fully exploit the potential of the CPUs. Only if one should and wants to meet Intel as a customer already so far to get a new operating system beside the CPU, then also the compared CPUs should not have to fight with blunt weapons.

From my point of view it is not irresponsible to create such benchmarks at a very early stage and also to use them as an internal comparison and orientation, but it is well known that the Ryzen CPUs under Windows 11 had to accept performance losses of up to 15% compared to Windows 10. But then a deliberate publication of false benchmark results is all the more questionable. I’ve remeasured some things with a completely updated system (Windows patches, AMD chipset drivers, motherboard BIOS) and can really only shake my head.

I won’t mention any numbers here for reasons, but it’s definitely the case that the picture has changed visibly in some cases. To produce such a silly slide that is reasonably up-to-date, you don’t even need a whole working day for benchmarking a single CPU and the necessary correction in PowerPoint. For a company with Intel’s resources, all this is actually a piece of cake, but quite obviously not wanted by the marketing department.

 

NVIDIA or AMD – In search of the right card

However, I don’t want to digress too far, but now come back to the test system and the most suitable graphics card. The fact that Intel prefers to use a graphics card from NVIDIA in the form of the GeForce RTX 3090 in the fight against AMD’s Ryzen is quite understandable, even if not 100% purposeful. While I did all of my professional testing (including certified hardware) with a very fast RTX A6000, gaming at lower resolutions doesn’t look quite as rosy in places because of the overhead from NVIDIA’s drivers. How strong and in which game, I will show in a moment, because it is not permanent.

The RTX A6000 can definitely be brought up to the level of the RTX 3090 with a little OC as a full upgrade of the GA102, but the whole thing is really only useful in Ultra HD, where the Radeon card shows its known weaknesses. Only in this case, an absolute GPU bound can even be calculated on the GeForce, which rather relativizes the supposed disadvantage. Yes, there is sometimes up to 12% performance difference between the two cards, it just doesn’t matter anymore. The biggest performance difference here was less than 2% between the slowest and fastest CPU, so when compared per card the results were again almost identical.

More important, on the other hand, is figuring out the real differences in CPU bound, which forces us into the low resolutions. But that’s exactly where the MSI RX 6900XT Gaming X that I used outclasses the big RTX A6000, sometimes shockingly clearly. And just as some games are extremely out of sync with Intel, it’s the same in my test, where while there’s “only” an ample 9 percentage point difference on average across all games, some games perform up to 20 percentage points faster. I also very deliberately created these benchmarks with only the second fastest Intel CPU, but will of course only use the percentages and not the real measured values in FPS before launch.

By the way, the whole thing hardly looks any different in full HD, even if it’s not quite as blatant. But the RX 6900XT definitely doesn’t have any disadvantages, and that’s all that mattered to me. So neither manufacturer preferences nor any emotions play a role here, but common sense. Sure, it’s an extra effort to do gaming and workstation benchmarks separately, but this actually allows for some parallelization of work if you can put in the effort of redundant hardware. And finally, to be clear: Of course, benchmarks with the GeForce RTX 3090 (or the RTX A6000) are definitely not wrong, on the contrary, but nuances are certainly more visible and clearer in the test with the Radeon. And that’s all I cared about.

Which brings us back to where we were. So the 720p is set in my tests, and so are the high resolutions. Because even if the FPS bars for all CPUs are unfortunately very similar in these, I offer you further details like power consumption for each game, the frame times and variances and therefore finally a very well broken down efficiency view. Then, such benchmarks will also result in a practical added value up to the consideration of whether a new platform and CPU is needed for WQHD (“1440p”) or whether it is better to stay with Windows 10 for the time being. Alder Lake is only available with forced marriage as a WIntel-Couple, of course you have to consider that in the end.

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

Smartengine

Veteran

145 Kommentare 134 Likes

Was mir sauer kommt ist die Folie von Intel.
Die haben die Messungen unter Win11 gemacht noch bevor der AMD Patch draussen war der die Latenzprobleme des Caches löste.
Da dann einen Vorsprung anzudeuten ist einfach.
Wie viel es in Real-Life sein wird, da freu ich mich schon auf die fachlichen Auswertungen von Igor :giggle:

Antwort 5 Likes

S
Staarfury

Veteran

257 Kommentare 206 Likes

Irgendwie habe ich den Verdacht, dass Alder Lake beim Stromverbrauch nicht annähernd so schlecht dasteht, wie allgemein angenommen wird.

Aus Igors bisherigen Andeutungen lässt sich vermuten, dass der Gaming Vorsprung ja nicht allzu gross sein dürfte. Gleichzeitig scheint er dem Produkt nicht abgeneigt zu sein. Das lässt für mich eigentlich nur noch zwei Optionen. Sehr gute Multicore Leistung und/oder Effizienz.

Antwort 1 Like

ro///M3o

Veteran

339 Kommentare 239 Likes

“WIntel“ 🤣🤣🤣👌🏼 genial!!! Aber mich nervt das auch tierisch. Steam, gib Gas Junge… Linux for Games!

Antwort 1 Like

LEIV

Urgestein

1,542 Kommentare 621 Likes

Kann ich mir auch vorstellen, das die Effizienz im gaming Betrieb gut ist, aber in Anwendungen wo alle Kerne voll belastet werden sieht es wahrscheinlich nicht mehr so toll aus.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,155 Kommentare 18,724 Likes

Ich vestehe bis heute nicht, warum Intel das alles so aufs Gaming fokussiert. Das Marketing gehört eigentlich gebrainwasht. Geile CPU, falsche Zielgruppe. Mehr dann am Freitag. Donnerstag gibts Games. :D

Antwort 3 Likes

Martin Gut

Urgestein

7,740 Kommentare 3,555 Likes

Bei gewissen Gamern kann man am besten einen Hype auslösen. 🤪🥳

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,155 Kommentare 18,724 Likes

Ja, aber die sind doch nur ein Teil der Käufer, die Marge fällt woanders ab. Gamer ist doch keine Berufsgruppe. Das ist fast schon eine Sozialprognose :D

Antwort 1 Like

noir.

Veteran

237 Kommentare 146 Likes

Hm, hat Intel zB beim erscheinen des 9900KS nicht ganz entschieden festgestellt, das synthetische Benchmarks eh vollkommen irrelevant sind und nur die "Real World Performance" zählt? Irgendwie sind sie ja putzig, die Jungs. Aber die Vergangenheit hat ja gezeigt, das Intels Balkendiagramme öfter mal etwas künstlerische Freiheit beinhalten.

Ich bin da vollkommen schmerzlos, ich kauf das was mir am meisten Leistung fürs Geld bringt. Aber Intels Marketing ist schon seit Ankündigung der Ryzen 1000er Serie vollkommen lächerlich geworden.

Antwort 2 Likes

RAZORLIGHT

Veteran

355 Kommentare 262 Likes

Typischer Intel Move bzgl. Ryzen und den Benchmarkfolien.
Dass Denuvo mal wieder Ärger macht ist auch keine Überraschung den Dreck braucht keiner.
Es gibt sogar eine EU Studie die belegt, dass Raubmordkopiererrei bei Spielen sogar einen positiven Trend auf die Verkaufszahlen hat.
Auch wird ein Raubmordkopierer nicht automatisch zu einem Käufer, wenn das Spiel nicht "kostenlos" verfügbar ist.
Früher war der Anteil an "Piraten* natürlich deutlich größer, im Verhältnis zu allen Spielern, aber Gaming ist enorm gewachsen und die meisten wissen noch nicht mal was ein Crack ist, Casuals eben. Dementsprechend ist dieses Thema immer unwichtiger was die Verkaufszahlen angeht.

Naja ein leidiges Thema.

Immerhin nimmt sich Igor dem Thema "welche GPU für CPU Tests an" während der Großteil wieder mit Nvidia testen wird.

Antwort 3 Likes

Zer0Strat

Veteran

162 Kommentare 138 Likes

Man kann es auch noch simpler formulieren: 720p, einfach weil man die CPU und eben nicht die GPU testen will.

Antwort 7 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,155 Kommentare 18,724 Likes

Genau das. Und deshalb verwischt die GeForce eigentlich zu viele Details. Bis zu 20% sind echt ein Brett.

Antwort 4 Likes

konkretor

Veteran

295 Kommentare 300 Likes

Ich freue mich schon auf die benches von Igor nächste Woche

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,155 Kommentare 18,724 Likes

Bin fast durch. Workstation dauert am längsten, vor allem bei den kleineren SKUs. Gaming ist fertig. :)

Antwort 3 Likes

W
Waldmeista

Mitglied

13 Kommentare 2 Likes

Bis inkl. des 9900KS der 127W TDP/PL1 und 159W PL2 hat, hat sich Intel ja an ihr selbstauferlegtes PL2=PL1x1,25 gehalten.
Danach kam die komplette Duldung für die Einfälle der Mainboardhersteller, mit wenigen Ausnahmen z.B. falls non-Z Bretter zu viel konnten.

Jetzt die Intelfolie mit diesem Hinweis, der für mit heißt: Default für unlocked 12th Gen ist PL1=PL2 ohne Zeiteinschränkung
Die Bewertung der unlocked 12th Gen Desktopprozessoren in der Standardkonfiguration wird die beste maximale Leistungsfähigkeit ermitteln.
https://www.igorslab.de/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Intel-12th-Gen_Seite_27.jpg
der i7-K wird um 51W kastriert
der i5-K wird um 91W kastriert

Ich bin sehr gespannt welche PL2 aka MTP für wie lange Intel den non-K zugesteht ... wird wohl bis März dauern.

Kerne /Threads
Max Turbo
PL1
PL2
i9-12900K
8C+8c/24T​
5,2 GHz​
125 W​
241 W​
i9-11900K
8C/16T​
5,3 GHz​
125 W​
251 W​
i9-10900K
10C/20T​
5,3 GHz​
125 W​
250 W​
i9-10900
10C/20T​
5,2 GHz​
65 W​
224 W​
i9-9900KS
8C/16T​
5,0 GHz​
127 W​
159 W​
i9-9900K
8C/16T​
5,0 GHz​
95 W​
119 W​
i7-12700K
8C+4c/20T​
5,0 GHz​
125 W​
190 W​
i7-11700K
8C/16T​
5,0 GHz​
125 W​
251 W​
i7-10700K
8C/16T​
5,1 GHz​
125 W​
229 W​
i7-10700
8C/16T​
4,8 GHz​
65 W​
224 W​
i5-12600K
6C+4c/16T​
4,9 GHz​
125 W​
150 W​
i5-11600K
6C/12T​
4,9 GHz​
125 W​
251 W​
i5-10600K
6C/12T​
4,8 GHz​
125 W​
182 W​
i5-10600
6C/12T​
4,8 GHz​
65 W​
134 W​
i5-10500
6C/12T​
4,5 GHz​
65 W​
134 W​
i5-12400
6C/12T​
4,4 GHz​
65 W​
i5-11400
6C/12T​
4,4 GHz​
65 W​
154 W​
i5-10400
6C/12T​
4,3 GHz​
65 W​
134 W​
i3-10320
4C/8T​
4,6 GHz​
65 W​
90 W​
i3-10300
4C/8T​
4,4 GHz​
65 W​
90 W​
i3-10100
4C/8T​
4,3 GHz​
65 W​
90 W​

Antwort 1 Like

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Igor Wallossek

1

10,155 Kommentare 18,724 Likes

Das Lustige ist ja, dass diese Marketingfolien den Whitepapers und Specs widersprechen. Natürlich kann man das machen, aber bitte nicht so :D

Antwort 1 Like

g
gedi

Mitglied

33 Kommentare 5 Likes

Gut, aber ist das nicht praxisfremd? Ich finde die Percentile in 1440p und 4k interessanter. Wenn hier die min. Frames soweit steigen, dass wenigstens Gsync/Freesync immer greift .... Ich denke, dass sind Dinge, welche Anwender mit einer besseren Hardware interessieren würden.

Antwort Gefällt mir

D
Denniss

Urgestein

1,510 Kommentare 547 Likes

in 720p giert die GPU nach Daten und hier muß eine CPU zeigen wie schnell sie diese leifern kann. Insofern ist das keinesfalls praxisfern wenn man die Leisungsfähigkeit einer CPU messen will.
Die min frames in höheren Auflösungen werden natürlich auch rangezogen aber die können auch durch die GPU beeinflusst sein

Antwort 2 Likes

DrWandel

Mitglied

79 Kommentare 61 Likes

Guter Punkt. Was sind denn die größten Märkte für CPUs? Das sind ganz oben die Server in den Rechenzentren großer Firmen, für Cloud, Webservices, numerische Berechnungen und vieles mehr; das läuft oft unter LINUX, und da werden viele Cores pro Server gebraucht; in dem Bereich ist AMD EPYC gut positioniert, aber Alder Lake und Ryzen haben da nichts verloren.

Da sind natürlich die Millionen von Office-PCs, aber viele Firmen setzen inzwischen auf Notebook-PCs, und auch da hat eine CPU die bis zu mehreren hundert Watt schluckt nichts verloren. Kleinere Firmen, man denke auch an mittelständische Unternehmen und Handwerkerbetriebe, brauchen zuverlässige und günstige PCs und keine CPU-Spitzenmodelle.

Was bleibt dann? Gaming und Enthusiasten, Video-Bearbeitung und so was in der Richtung. Wenn man sich ansieht wie viele Nutzer auf Steam aktiv sind und bei den neuesten MMORPGs, dann ist Gaming ein recht ordentlicher Markt. Spieler mit WQHD und UHD stecken da vermutlich oft im GPU-Limit, vor allem dann wenn sie eigentlich eine neue Grafikkarte bräuchten, aber beim aktuellen Preisniveau zögern, und da tut dann auch eine Mittelklasse-CPU, bei den meisten Spielen zumindest. E-Sport-Spieler, die gerne eine dreistellige FPS-Zahl bei FHD haben, profitieren vielleicht am ehesten von einer Top-CPU, so meine Vermutung.

Was gibt es denn sonst noch für große Absatzmärkte für CPUs?

Antwort 1 Like

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Igor Wallossek

1

10,155 Kommentare 18,724 Likes

Ihr seht es immer aus der Sicht der Selberbauer und gut informierten, technik-affinen Leser, was natürlich legitim ist. Allerdings sollte man die Umsätz bei den SI und den großen Fertig-PC Anbietern (Dell u.a.) nicht unterschätzen, denn gerade dort werden echte Stückzahlen umgesetzt. Da sind Mindfactory & Co nur kleine Tröpfchen im Wind. Deutschland ist, auch was die Selberbauer betrifft, eine echte Ausnahme. So einen SI muss man allerdings schon anders überzeugen, denn da geht es am Ende nur um Stückzahlen, Margen und Absätze. Aktuell ist es allerdings so, dass sich die einfacheren Fertig-PCs vor allem über den Preis und die Datenträgerkapazität definieren, die teureren "Gaming"-PCs fast immer nur über die Grafikkarte und den RAM. Die Anzahl der Kerne bei den verbauten CPUs nicht zu vergessen. E-Sport ist im Wachsen, aber es ist noch lange kein Massenphänomen. Ich habe öfters Kontakt zur Branche und weiß auch, wo aktuell die Trends hingehen.

Intels Vorteil ist die integrierte Grafik, die es quasi für lau dazu gibt. In diesen Bereichen generiert man Umsätze, die auch durch die Homeoffice-Geschichten nicht so stark in Richtung Laptop gekippt sind, wie allgemein befürchtet. Denn produktiv an einem 15"- oder 17"-Display kann man auf Dauer nun mal nicht arbeiten. Und dann kommt die Content-Creation dazu, denn auch das funktioniert ja nicht nur über Grafikkarten.

Meine ganz private Meinung ist, dass CPUs wie ein 5950X oder 12900K eigentlich nur etwas für eine kleine Randgruppe sind. Enthusiasten, die so etwas einfach haben wollen oder glauben, ohne die Teile zu sterben. Ich zocke und arbeite hier im Büro noch an einem PC mit einem alten 9900K, was für mich als UHD-Gelegenheitszocker mehr als ausreicht, weil es ja eh die Grafikkarte richtet. Nachteile gibt es partiell, aber dafür gibts die Workstation mit dem Threadripper im "Gaming"-Table (an dem ich aber nie zocke). Aber da war so schön viel Platz für die Wakü, die bis zu 900 Watt wegschaffen muss. Den Rest verbuche ich unter Bequemlichkeit, Zufriedenheit und auch Nachhaltigkeit. Die CPU hat schon 3 SSDs überlebt, auch eine Erkenntnis. :D

Dieser Wahn, alles auf der letzten Rille fahren zu müssen, ist mittlerweile echt absurd. Da brüstet man sich bei einer Gaming-CPU mit Cinebench-Werten, die weder Gamer noch Creators in der Praxis jemals interessieren werden. Wozu dann eigentlich? Künstlich kontruierte Best-Cases, mehr nicht. Ich habe den 12900K sowohl mit PL1 auf 125 Watt als auch auf 241 Watt gebenchmarkt und festgestellt, dass das kleinere PL1 im Durchschnitt der Produktivanwendungen sogar höhere Werte lieferte. Klingt erst einmal paradox, ist es aber nicht, wenn man den Einsatz der E-Cores überwacht. So perfekt ist Intels Thread-Director nämlich auch nicht und es schwächelt meist dann, wenn man sich im Mittelfeld zwischen Full-Load oder Idle befindet und Applikationen verschiedene Load-Szenarien gleichzeitig generieren, z.B. Simulationsberechnung zusammen mit 3D-Realtime und dem Schreiben von Daten. Man kann sich nämlich auch zu Tode saufen. :D

Antwort 8 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung