Basics GPUs Graphics Practice Reviews Software

Total Board Power (TBP) vs. real power consumption and the inadequacy of software tools vs. real measurements

Since many users and especially YouTubers as well as twitchers still take the values of tools like the MSI Afterburner or AMD’s Radeon software for the power consumption of their graphics card at face value, I have to add something. The vast amount of videos that are supposed to show how much more “economical” graphics card A is supposed to be compared to graphics card B still make those who know better (and can) cry in rows. Funny side note: Even NVIDIA distributes PCAT, a tool that serves to find the truth about the power consumption of graphics cards, among editors and relevant video creators today. However, it has been rather less helpful so far, unfortunately.

Because questions kept coming up as to why the values I measured in games deviated so much from the manufacturer’s specifications (TBP) for the entire graphics card, I revised an existing article a bit and added a new chapter in front of it. Here I first analyze 11 games with and without ray tracing load in Ultra-HD for most relevant cards, which we also still know from the launch article about the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 4090 24 GB. Because the result is quite interesting. In deviation from the last test, I ran the custom Radeon RX 6950XT with a reference BIOS because it would have otherwise distorted the measurements a bit.

After this introduction, we will also primarily look at the solution approach of both manufacturers in terms of determining and logging the power consumption, because there is still a lot of catching up to do here. Software tools and AMD cards have always been a nagging problem, but more on that later. You can of course measure Radeons properly at the power supplies, but you can’t read them cleanly. Unfortunately, what all the tools display is not all that passes through the lines. But more about that on the next page.

450 watt card not equal to 450 watt card!

Looking at the first graph, we can see that the GeForce RTX 3090 Ti is a true 450 watt power limit (TBP) card, which unfortunately fully achieves this power consumption even in gaming. However, the so often (completely unjustly) scolded GeForce RTX 4090 is more of a 380 watt card in gaming, which only uses the available performance margin at all when you run stress tests or run pure compute on the shaders!

With Ada, NVIDIA has built in an extreme buffer in contrast to its own Ampere cards and AMD, which can be achieved in places, but is usually not reached in every application. Every game is different and there are extreme examples that demand a lot of performance. But in the whole range of applications, average values are always the most objective statement. After all, you don’t always drive steeply uphill in real life.

For all other cards, manufacturer claims and power consumption in UHD gaming are very close to or even slightly exceed the stated TBP with 98 to 99% GPU load (the last three cards in the charts below). But they are deviations in the low single-digit percentage range. For the not yet launched GeForce 4080 16GB, you can only pull out the calculator for NDA reasons and put TBP and the real measurement into relation. Then it would be 274 watts in gaming for this new card, which is specified with 320 watts. That won’t quite be enough, because the chip should clock higher due to the smaller size and shader count, making it a bit more inefficient. However, it could well be around 280 watts. Purely speculative.

Since AMD’s cards have always reached the specified TBP in ultra HD so far, one could certainly assume that it could also be the case for the Radeon 7900XTX or RX 7900XT. The only question is whether AMD has managed to achieve a similarly wide window in the actual power consumption. Because only then would the card be a match for the GeForce RTX 4080 at the socket in daily use. Here you will really have to look several times and more closely at how efficiently both opponents can really act.

With image acceleration methods like DLSS, FSR or XeSS, the 450 watt card in the form of the GeForce RTX 4090 turns into a 350 watt card (also referring to the average), while the GeForce RTX 3090 Ti cannot break away from the 400 watt zone. The other cards are again roughly on a par here. In addition, the large Ada card is of course already slowed down by the CPU from time to time. This is exactly the point where you can test the GeForce RTX 4080 16GB on launch day at the latest, because if you were to apply the factor that results for the RTX 4090 here. If it were a real, sole bottleneck for the RTX 4090, then the upcoming GeForce RTX 4080 16GB should only be affected very little and consume approximately what was measurable without DLSS again.

Once again, I determined the percentage ratio to the specified TBP for these measurements. That is really clear:

Now that we’ve got that out of the way, we can move on to other things before the next big launch next week. If you want to question the difference between TBP, TGP and TDP again, I refer you to a further article, which is almost a classic, but still valid. And just by the way: there are many other load scenarios than games or stress tests. That’s just a side note, but you already know that from all my reviews.

Power Consumption: TDP, TBP and TGP for Nvidia and AMD graphics cards calculated with destruction of a PR film | igorsLAB

 

657 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

RX480

Urgestein

1,217 Kommentare 611 Likes

Wow,
Soviel mehr hätte ich jetzt net erwartet.

Ansonsten mal schön zu sehen, wieviel mehr Watt die heisse Graka ggü. der Kalten verbraucht.
Da lohnt es sich bestimmt ab nem Punkt X gar net mehr so richtig, noch mehr W drauf zu braten.
(mal abgesehen davon, das ne Air6900 bei 95°C - Hotspot oder gar niedriger schon langsamer wird, dito NV
auch bei einigen Grakas den GPU-takt runterstept; ... sofern net vorher der Vram schon zu heiss war)

Außerdem gut, das die 3,3V mit erwähnt wurden, was manche Reviewer gerne unterschlagen.

Antwort 2 Likes

Igor Wallossek

Format©

7,642 Kommentare 12,805 Likes

Hund-Schwanz-Prinzip. Richtig.

Antwort 3 Likes

RX480

Urgestein

1,217 Kommentare 611 Likes

Das beste Bsp. Hierzu war bisher hier das Review zum UVen bei der 6800 von Gurdi. (oder das 300W-Review zur Ti letztens)
Ohne großen Leistungsverlust (fps) wurden 40W asic bzw. 20% bei der 6800 gespart!
(da war bestimmt das "kalt" halten sinnvoll)

Antwort 3 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
F
Falcon

Mitglied

42 Kommentare 41 Likes

Solange ich noch am Durchtesten des Systems bin hab ich immer nen einfaches Energiemeßgerät an der Kiste hängen.

Schon erstaunlich wieviel W man mit ein bisschen Undervolten und Übertakten ohne Leistungsverlust an Grafikkarten so Einsparen kann.

Antwort 1 Like

xlOrDsNaKex

Mitglied

14 Kommentare 17 Likes

Danke dir Igor für die immer wieder sehr interessanten, tiefergehenden und sehr technischen Artikel. Schön zu sehen das du nicht einfach immer nur "nachplapperst" sondern den Sachen tatsächlich auf den Grund gehst und auch mal den Finger in die Wunde legst, wenn es sein muss!

Antwort 6 Likes

Göran

Veteran

135 Kommentare 52 Likes

Super Beitrag, auch für elektrotechnische Laien eine plausible Erklärung, Danke dafür Igor !

Antwort 1 Like

grimm

Urgestein

2,240 Kommentare 1,356 Likes

Der Aufbau sieht extrem aufwändig aus - Danke für den ausführlichen Test!

Antwort Gefällt mir

Casi030

Urgestein

8,093 Kommentare 1,336 Likes

Du hast aber nicht zufälligerweise Screens von HWINFO64 gemacht von NVIDIA und AMD um die Daten mal zu vergleichen?
Was Ich z.b. nicht verstehe ist wenn ich im AMD Treiber PPT 300Watt einstelle,dann zieht die GPU um 225Watt und der Rest zieht 75Watt damit es die 300Watt sind.Was verbaucht jetzt noch mal rund 30% mehr?

Antwort 1 Like

Martin Gut

Urgestein

5,860 Kommentare 2,360 Likes

Endlich verstehe ich, wie unterschiedlich die Hersteller die Leistungsaufnahme messen. Da ich noch keine AMD-Grafikkarte hatte, habe ich mich noch nicht so genau damit befasst.

Um die GPU immer mit einer bestimmten Leistung laufen zu lassen, macht die Messung von AMD natürlich Sinn. Für die Überwachung der Spannungswandler und der ganzen Leistungsaufnahme bringt das natürlich wenig.

Nun übertakte ich meine Nvidia-Grafikkarte, indem ich die Lüfter über das Mainboard versorge. Dann bekommt die GPU schon ein paar Watt mehr. Interessante Denkweise. 😉

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

Format©

7,642 Kommentare 12,805 Likes

Du hast den Artikel nicht gelesen. Bei AMD stellst Du NIEMALS die gesamte Karte ein. Und wenn Du 300 Watt fürs Power Target vorgibst, dann müssen die gar nicht reale 300 Watt TGP am Stecker sein, weil Du im Wattman die TDC ja nicht mit anheben kannst und die Spannungsbegrenzung für eine Leistungsbegrenzung sorgt. Das ist schon etwas komplexer und AMD ist alles außer Chip und Speicher schnurzegal.

HWinfo liest NVIDIA auch richtig aus, nur AMD ist halt komplett beschnitten, weil das nur ein paar DCR-Werte sind. Da kann HWInfo nichts dafür. Die Werte decken sich mit denen von GPU-Z und dem Afterburner, weil alle die gleiche API nutzen. AMD kann man icht komplett auslesen. Nur hochrechnen, wenn man die Komponenten genau kennt. Über die gemessenen Temps und die Datenblattkurven der SPS kommt man schon recht ordentlich voran, wenn man die restlichen Verluste noch mit ausrechnen kann. Ich kann das, aber der Normalanwender nicht. Der muss dann grob schätzen, was fast immer schief geht.

Antwort 2 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Gurdi

Urgestein

1,234 Kommentare 753 Likes

Schöner Artikel, bei AMD brauch man schon ein digitales Netzteil um valide Werte zu berechnen von der TBP. Die Karten unterscheiden sich da teils gravierend. Meine 6800XT LC brauch schon 40-50 Watt extra trotz sehr guter Kühlung, die 6800 dagegen ist deutlich genügsamer mit 20-30Watt.

@Igor Wallossek Wie misst eine NV Karte den PEG? Sitzen da auch nochmal Shunts?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

Format©

7,642 Kommentare 12,805 Likes

Ja, das steht sogar im Artikel. Schau mal aufs Schema, den Bereich habe ich sogar eingezeichnet und beschrieben. Current Sense :)
Bei der abgebildeten Karte ist der Shunt auf der Rückseite.

Digitale Netzeile sind aber auch nur Schätzeisen, denn die Auflösung ist wirklich mies. Dann lieber das Teil von Elmor. Allen gemeinsam ist aber, dass man die 3.3 Volt nicht bekommt. :D

Antwort 1 Like

Gurdi

Urgestein

1,234 Kommentare 753 Likes

Die 3,3V kann ich ohne Probleme messen am Netzteil. Das Digifanless ist dabei auch recht genau, hast du sogar selbst gesagt (und hast es auch selbst verwendet wenn ich mich recht erinnere)

View image at the forums

Antwort Gefällt mir

D
Deridex

Urgestein

2,020 Kommentare 730 Likes

Ich finde diese Werte bis auf 3 Stellen hinterm Komma immer wieder amüsant. Ich wäre sehr überascht, wenn so ein Netzteil das tatsächlich so genau messen kann, dass die 3te Stelle hinterm Komma noch ernsthaft aussagekräftig ist.

Ich lasse mich da gerne natürlich gerne positiv überraschen, bin da ber trotzdem eher pessimistisch.

Antwort 1 Like

F
Furda

Veteran

200 Kommentare 109 Likes

@ Herr Wallossek
Schöner und sehr interessanter Artikel, vielen Dank. Fühle mich etwas in die 90er versetzt, als ich noch in der Elektrotechnik tätig war.

Bezgl. GPU Spannungen in Tools auslesen, bei Ampere z.B. soll es die Möglichkeit geben, die 'echte' NVVDD auszulesen, also die real anliegende Spannung der GPU, welche nicht mit der 'gewünschten' GPU Spannung (der Takt-Spannung-Kurve) übereinstimmen muss, welche die gängigen Tools anzeigen. Diese 'echte' NVVDD habe ich bisher nur in Ampere Tools gesehen. Ist für mich mittlerweile bei OC/UV ein wichtiger Punkt, genau wie GPU Clock vs. GPU Effective Clock, der einem etwas mehr darüber erzählen möchte/könnte, in welchen Betriebszuständen (Spannung vs. Clock) sich die GPU wohler fühlt, als in anderen Bereichen (Stichwort Sweet Spot(s)). Gibt es dazu Informationen, über welche Sie reden dürfen?

@ Martin G
Ja genau, der PWM Wert für die Lüfterdrehzahl wird von der GPU auch ausgegeben, wenn kein Lüfter angeschlossen ist. Diesen Wert kann man dann per Software (z.B. FanControl) auf Lüfter kopieren resp. synchronisieren, welche anderswo (z.B. am Mainboard) angeschlossen sind. Wenn man es Software-unabhängig machen möchte, kann man ein Spezial-Kabel machen und das originale PWM Signal Hardware-seitig vom GPU Fan Stecker abzapfen, Energieversorgung über das Mainboard.

@ Deridex
Dito, habe deshalb alle Nachkommastellen in HWInfo ausgeschaltet, ausser dort, wo sie wirklich im relevanten Wertebereich liegen. Gibt zudem ein aufgeräumteres, weniger 'nervöses' Monitoring.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Advertising

Advertising