CPU Gaming Motherboard Reviews Workstations

AMD Ryzen 9 7900 and Ryzen 5 7600 Review – Gaming and workstation tests on energy saving flame

AMD releases the new Zen 4 CPUs without X in the name today. Of course, I was able to test the CPUs in the form of the Ryzen 9 7900 and Ryzen 5 7600 in advance and also added the respective X models freshly. Even though these new CPUs might look rather unspectacular at first glance, the slightly lower price and higher efficiency could definitely make it possible to open up new fields of application. In addition to gaming, I also tested various workstation applications very extensively, and without spoiling too much: it doesn’t look that bad in places, on the contrary.

Important preliminary remark about the test field and the test methodology

The fact that I only have two of the three new CPUs in the test field today with the Ryzen 9 7900X and the Ryzen 5 7600 is simply due to the fact, that AMD surely thought that these two samples would probably have the greatest relevance for my readers. The Ryzen 7 7700 could not be found privately in a hurry and I did not want to emulate it in the end. At this point, I also want to introduce further articles, which of course complement and round off this launch article, because everything doesn’t fit into a single review and redundancies are boring to read.

The new CPUs: AMD Ryzen 7000 ‘Zen 4 Raphael’ without X

We finally get to the two new CPUs, which as mentioned earlier, consist of three SKUs based on the Zen 4-core architecture, the AMD Ryzen 9 7900, the AMD Ryzen 7 7700 and the AMD Ryzen 5 7600. The new CPUs are not that different from their X counterparts, but AMD wants to lower the price significantly. Considering the fact that these three CPUs could be catapulted to the level of the X versions with the manual softening of the strict PBO limits, it is definitely nothing more than an indirect discount for insiders. The fact that efficiency then suffers just like in the normal X models is again somewhat different, but also logical. Miracles take place elsewhere.

Before we turn to the core specifications of these three SKUs, we must point out that the AMD Ryzen 7000 CPUs are based on a TSMC 5nm process node with a CCD die size of 70mm2 compared to 83mm2 for Zen 3 and feature a total of 6.57 billion transistors, a 58% increase over the Zen 3 CCD with 4.  The CPUs adopt the Zen 4 architecture, which brings a 13% IPC increase, but most of the performance benefit comes from the higher clock speeds and a higher TDP added to each chip compared to the previous generation.

AMD has announced an increase of up to 29% in single-threaded performance, over 35% in multi-threaded performance, and 25% better perf/watt when comparing Zen 4 and Zen 3 cores, and it will be my pleasure to review that today as well. The IOD of the new CPUs is manufactured on the 6nm process node and accommodates an iGPU with 2 RDNA 2 compute units that operate at up to 2200 MHz. The size of the chip is 124.7 mm2, which is almost the same as that of the Zen 3 IOD, which measures 124.9 mm2. Compared to Zen 3, the Zen 4 architecture is also said to be very efficient, offering 62% less power for the same performance and 49% more performance for the same power consumption. 

According to AMD, the increases in IPC come from a new Front End & Load/Store + Branch Predictor, which should already account for about 80% of the improvements, while L2 cache structuring and execution engines should account for the remaining 20% of the improvements. In addition, AVX-512 and VNNI are said to be able to increase FP32 (multi-thread) performance by up to 30% and INT8 (multi-thread) CPU performance by 2.5 times. In addition to the larger caches, the micro-op cache has been increased from 4 KB to 6.75 KB and the L1I and L1D caches have been increased to 32 KB. The size of the L2 cache has also doubled to 1 MB and now also runs at 14 instead of 12 cycles, while the L3 cache has increased from 46 to 50 cycles. The L1 BTB was also increased from 1 KB to 1.5 KB.

AMD Ryzen 9 7900

The AMD Ryzen 9 7900 tested today offers a count of 12 cores and 24 threads, which is retained from the previous two generations. The CPU has a base frequency of 3.7 GHz and a boost clock of up to 5.4 GHz. One should have gone to the limits here and exhausted what is still somehow stably possible within the 65 Watt TDP (90 Watt PPT). As for the cache, the CPU has 76 MB, 64 MB of which comes from L3 (32 MB per CCD) and 12 MB from L2 (1 MB per core). The CPU consists of an IOD and two chiplets (CCD).

AMD Ryzen 7 7600

The AMD Ryzen 7 7600 is a 6-core / 12-thread processor. AMD is effectively positioning this CPU as the new efficient sweet spot for gamers and as such, the CPU will have a base clock of 3.8 GHz and a boost clock of 5.1 GHz and will also feature the low TDP of 65 watts (90 watts PPT). The CPU has a 38 MB cache pool, which consists of 32 MB L3 from the single CCD and 6 MB L2 from the Zen 4 cores. The special feature (also in terms of cooling) is that these smaller CPUs (as well as the Ryzen 5 7600X) only use one chiplet (CCD) next to the centrally placed IOD. The lower price compared to the Ryzen 5 7600X will of course also be meant to counter Intel’s smaller CPUs. However, if you look at the total costs for the AM5 platform, it is not quite enough. But it is at least an investment in the future.

Boxed cooler

Interestingly, AMD completes the CPUs with a real boxed cooler again. Wraith Stealth (Ryzen 5 7600) and Prism (Ryzen 9 7900) are again available for free, depending on the CPU. The large Prism cooler (the one with ARGB and optional USB port) costs from around 30 Euros individually, the small Stealth is available for prices starting at around 8 Euros. Both coolers come from AVC and are actually old acquaintances. Since the new CPUs have been classified with a TDP of 65 watts, there are certainly no real problems there. Let’s see…

Here is a quick table with all released and announced Ryzen 7000 in direct comparison:

Model Cores/Threads Clock
(Basis/Turbo)
L2 + L3 TDP Price (MSRP)
AMD Ryzen 9 7950X3D 16/32 4.2/5.7 GHz 16+64+64 MB 120 W  
AMD Ryzen 9 7950X 16/32 4.5/5.7 GHz 16+64 MB 170 W 849 Euro / 699 USD
AMD Ryzen 9 7900X3D 12/24 4.4/5.6 GHz 12+64+64 MB 120 W  
AMD Ryzen 9 7900X 12/24 4.7/5.6 GHz 12+64 MB 170 W 669 Euro /549 USD
AMD Ryzen 9 7900 12/24 3.7/5.4 GHz 12+64 MB 65 W 429 USD
AMD Ryzen 7 7800X3D 8/16 4.4/5.0 GHz 8+32+64 MB 120 W  
AMD Ryzen 7 7700X 8/16 4.5/5.4 GHz 8+32 MB 105 W 479 Euro / 399 USD
AMD Ryzen 7 7700 8/16 3.8/5.3 GHz 8+32 MB 65 W  
AMD Ryzen 5 7600X 6/12 4.7/5.3 GHz 6+32 MB 105 W 359 Euro / 299 USD
AMD Ryzen 5 7600 6/12 3.8/5.1 GHz 6+32 MB 65 W 229 USD

 

Test setup

I’m using the same system for gaming and the application and workstation tests as I did in the Zen 4 launch article, so I’ll mostly save the textual redundancy now. The systems was frozen and the problematic UEFI with AGESA ComboAM5PI 1.0.0.4, which was provided to me as a beta version by MSI, was ONLY used to test the two non-X CPUs. All other Ryzen CPUs were tested again with the previous UEFI and AGESA ComboAM5PI 1.0.0.3. Some of the previous Zen4 CPUs were affected by boot loops and freezes, or changes could no longer be saved in the UEFI.

The measurement of the detailed power consumption and other, more in-depth things is done here in the lab (where the thermographic infrared recordings are also created with a high-resolution industrial camera in the air-conditioned room at the end) on two tracks by means of high-resolution oscilloscope technology (there are also various follow-ups!) and the self-created, MCU-based measurement setup for motherboards and graphics cards (pictures below) or NVIDIA’s PCAT.

The audio measurements are done outside in my Chamber (room within a room). But everything in its own time, because today it’s all about gaming (for now).

I have also summarized the individual components of the test system in a table:

Test System and Equipment
Hardware:

AMD AM5
Ryzen 9 7950X, Ryzen 7 7700X (Part 1) Ryzen 9 7900X, Ryzen 5 7800X (Part 2)
MSI MEG X670E ACE
2x 16 GB Corsair DOMINATOR RGB 32 GB 6000 EXPO(2 x 16 GB) @CL30

AMD AM4
Ryzen 9 5800X3D, Ryzen 9 5900X, Ryzen 7 5800X, Ryzen 7 5800X3D
MSI MEG X570 Godlike
2x 16 GB Corsair DOMINATOR RGB 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) @DDR4 3600 CL14

Intel LGA 1700
Core i9-12900K, Core i7-12700K, Core i5-12600K, Core i5-12400
MSI MEG Z690 Ace
2x 16 GB Corsair DOMINATOR RGB 32 GB 6200(2 x 16 GB) @DDR5 6000 CL30

MSI Radeon RX 6950XT Gaming X Trio OC

2x 2 TB MSI Spatium M480
Be Quiet! Dark Power Pro 12 1500 watts

Cooling:
Alphacool Core One Black Prototype, Custom Loop Water Cooling / Chiller
Alphacool Apex
Case:
Cooler Master Benchtable
Monitor: LG OLED55 G19LA
Power Consumption:
Oscilloscope-based system:
Non-contact direct current measurement on PCIe slot (riser card)
Non-contact direct current measurement at the external PCIe power supply
Direct voltage measurement at the respective connectors and at the power supply unit
2x Rohde & Schwarz HMO 3054, 500 MHz multichannel oscilloscope with memory function
4x Rohde & Schwarz HZO50, current clamp adapter (1 mA to 30 A, 100 KHz, DC)
4x Rohde & Schwarz HZ355, probe (10:1, 500 MHz)
1x Rohde & Schwarz HMC 8012, HiRes digital multimeter with memory function

MCU-based shunt measuring (own build, Powenetics software)
Up to 10 channels (max. 100 values per second)
Special riser card with shunts for the PCIe x16 Slot (PEG)
NVIDIA PCAT and FrameView 1.1

Thermal Imager:
1x Optris PI640 + 2x Xi400 Thermal Imagers
Pix Connect Software
Type K Class 1 thermal sensors (up to 4 channels)
Acoustics:
NTI Audio M2211 (with calibration file)
Steinberg UR12 (with phantom power for the microphones)
Creative X7, Smaart v.7
Own anechoic chamber, 3.5 x 1.8 x 2.2 m (LxDxH)
Axial measurements, perpendicular to the center of the sound source(s), measuring distance 50 cm
Noise emission in dBA (slow) as RTA measurement
Frequency spectrum as graphic
OS: Windows 11 Pro 2H22 (all updates/patches, current certified drivers)

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

c
cunhell

Urgestein

558 Kommentare 526 Likes

Ich glaube auf der ersten Seite in den Überschriften muss jeweils das "X" bei der CPU-Bezeichung weg. Statt "AMD Ryzen 9 7900X " muss es wohl "AMD Ryzen 9 7900" etc. heissen

Cunhell

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,330 Kommentare 19,156 Likes

Ja, da wir die Hand schneller als das Gehirn :D
Danke

Antwort Gefällt mir

c
cunhell

Urgestein

558 Kommentare 526 Likes
O
Oberst

Veteran

341 Kommentare 131 Likes

Wenn AMD es jetzt noch schaffen würde, die Board Preise auf ein vernünftiges Niveau zu bringen, dann wäre ich mal geneigt, aufzurüsten. Aber aktuell fängt B550 bei 80€ an und B650 mit ebenfalls nur PCIe 4.0 bei 170€. Gut, vielleicht ein besseres VRM und ein teurerer Sockel auf AM5 Seite. Aber ich würde die Boards eher bei ab 100€ sehen, recht viel mehr sind sie meiner Meinung nach nicht wert. Und da ist man leider noch weit weg.
Ansonsten würde mir der 7600 oder maximal der 7700 wohl reichen, mehr als 400€ will ich für eine neue GPU nicht ausgeben. Und für den Preisbereich reichen die CPUs auch noch locker, ohne das man das an der Leistung merkt.

Danke für den Test!

Antwort 1 Like

ipat66

Urgestein

1,378 Kommentare 1,386 Likes

PCI 4 reicht doch noch vollkommen aus;und das auf absehbare Zeit.
Die ersten PCI 5 SSD's kommen ja erst noch,und da gibt es dann für 170 Euro wahrscheinlich nur den SSD-Kühler... :D
In Games wird es keinen Unterschied geben (zu PCI5).

In professionellen Anwendungen wird es einen Unterschied machen.
Mit der neuen AMD Plattform wird man über Jahre glücklich sein können.
Der Preis wird auf jeden Fall interessanter.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Cerebral_Amoebe

Veteran

118 Kommentare 57 Likes

@Igor
Ich habe noch einen kleinen Tippfehler gefunden:
Da ist ein n zuviel.
Danke für den Test!

Antwort Gefällt mir

K
Kyuss

Mitglied

45 Kommentare 60 Likes

Hallo Igor,

ich wollte Mal Feedback zur mobile Seite geben. Auf Android mit Chrome sind die Tabellen immer sehr "verzogen".

Mit den kommenden X3D Prozessoren sind die glaube ich aktuell nicht Fisch, nicht Fleisch. Vor allen der Sinn des 7600 erschließt sich mir so gar nicht....

Antwort 1 Like

G
Gamer

Veteran

147 Kommentare 37 Likes

Wieder mal der Beweis dass AMD die mit Abstand besten Prozessoren baut. Da ist für wirklich jeden was dabei. Und demächst dann noch 3D! :love:

Antwort Gefällt mir

Andy197

Veteran

196 Kommentare 96 Likes

@Gamer was am besten ist, hängt immer vom Anwendungsfall ab.
Auf die x3d bin ich aber auch gespannt. Das ist was, das Intel ärgern kann.

Leider fehlt hier immernoch der 13700k :( auch wenn es in diesem Test/Vergleich sowieso egal ist.
@Igor Wallossek Wird dieser noch getestet oder hat sich das erledigt weil Intel nur den i5 und i9 geschickt hat?

Antwort Gefällt mir

P
Pokerclock

Veteran

465 Kommentare 396 Likes

Intel scheint derzeit kein großes Interesse daran zu haben, einen 13700K an Tester zu versenden. Intel hat auch speziell bei den Billig-Prozessoren gar kein Interesse etwas zur Verfügung zu stellen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

D
Deridex

Urgestein

2,218 Kommentare 851 Likes

Ich finde die non X Prozessoren von AMDs 7xxx Reihe deutlich attraktiver als die X-Versionen. Bei Intel sehe ich es ähnlich. Hier finde ich die Raptor Lake I5 auch attraktiver als die I7 und I9.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,339 Likes

Den non X fehlt die Single Core Leistung was wiederum schlechter ist.
Da betreib ich doch lieber ein X mit der gleichen Effizienz und hab mehr Single Core Leistung in Reserve.

Antwort 1 Like

DrDre

Veteran

244 Kommentare 98 Likes

Oder Du spielst mit den PBO Werten rum ;)
Dann kommst da auch hin.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,339 Likes

Deswegen ja,ob ich jetzt einen non x mit 75Watt betreibe oder ein X spielt keine Rolle bis auf das der X höher Taktet im Single Core.
Ram mal weiter runter gesellt und SOC Spannung mittlerweile?

Antwort 1 Like

Andy197

Veteran

196 Kommentare 96 Likes

Naja wenn ich mir die Preise der non x ansehen, sehe ich irgendwie keinen Grund eine kastrierte CPU zu kaufen für 15-20 Taler weniger. Lieber die X und dann UV oder Powerlimit setzen. Denke das merkt man ich beim Verkauf, dass die non x schlechter weg gehen würden

Antwort 2 Likes

Steffdeff

Urgestein

765 Kommentare 718 Likes

Schön das AMD sich bei den non X Modellen sich nicht wieder soviel Zeit lässt wie bei Zen3!
Schade das der 7700 nicht mit im Test ist.
Wenn die Mainboardpreise für AM5 noch sinken, wäre das wahrscheinlich eine tolle Kombi. Zumindest bis die 7000er X3D CPU‘s in bezahlbare Regionen kommen.
Auch schön zu sehen das der 5800X3D noch lange nicht zum Altsilizium gehört.
Generell toll wie lange AM4 sich am Markt hält. Auch ein guter Beitrag zur Nachhaltigkeit, wenn die Plattform mehrere Generationen von Prozessoren tragen kann.

Danke für den Test!

[Edit]: für die meisten hier im Forum sind die nonX Modelle wahrscheinlich uninteressant da sie ihre CPU sowieso selbst optimieren , aber die große Masse
traut sich da nicht ran.

Antwort 1 Like

D
Deridex

Urgestein

2,218 Kommentare 851 Likes

Ja die Preise für AM5 Mainboards sehe ich auch als Problem. Hoffe das bessert sich noch.

Antwort Gefällt mir

D
Denniss

Urgestein

1,545 Kommentare 558 Likes

Günstige Einsteigerboards unterhalb des B650 wurden ja angekündigt fürs Frühjahr - A620 Chipsatz?
Da wird sicherlich PCIe 5 wegfallen um am PCB sparen zu können (PCIe 4 vielleicht nur für NVMe und PEG-Slot), könnte mir auch vorstellen dass die Unterstützung von 170W TDP CPUs nicht verpflichtend sein wird um an den VRMs abspecken zu können.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,339 Likes

Liegt daran das es auch keine Infos dazu gibt wie man Ryzen CPUs ab der 3000er Serie richtig Optimiert weil es passiert ja nix mit der CPU und Abstürzen kann da auch nix wenn das Mainboard nicht blockt.

Antwort 2 Likes

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung