Allgemein Audio/Peripherals Practice Pro Reviews System Workstations

2 PCs, 1 Desk, 0 Chaos – Level1Techs DisplayPort 1.4 Dual-Monitor KVM Switch | Usability Test

Anyone who spends a lot of time in a home office knows the dilemma: one computer for work, one computer for private use, both with monitors and peripherals, but both somehow have to be on the same desk. Chaos ensues, ergonomics and productivity suffer. The remedy is a KVM switch. We’ll take a look at what that is and what an implementation of it might look like in today’s test.

Concept of a KVM switch

The concept of a KVM switch is as simple as it is ingenious. You connect a set of peripherals and all the computers to the KVM switch and then you can switch the peripherals from computer to computer. Effectively, the principle is similar to a railroad switch. For those who work in data centers and server landscapes, what I just explained is nothing new. Often dozens of servers in a server rack with their output for video and input for mouse and keyboard are connected to a KVM switch and all on site administration takes place from there. Conversely, it would be very impractical if each server in a rack needed its own set of mouse, keyboard and monitor.

Often these server KVM switches also have the possibility to pack the inputs and outputs to and from systems into Ethernet frames, so that they can be sent over longer distances in the network, and or even offer a web interface, so that even the “local administration” can be done completely remotely. Today’s system administrators really only have to leave their desks when something needs to be done physically with the hardware.

But enough preamble, how does this help us in our office at home? The same principle can be applied to desktop computers, but with a smaller number of systems and slightly different requirements. For example, at home you might want to have audio or fast USB and perhaps connect one or more high-resolution monitors. And this is precisely where the wheat is separated from the chaff for many products on the market. Either only USB 2.0, no audio, only a monitor or video output standards from 15 years ago are often compromises that you have to accept. Not so with the KVM switch we’re looking at today: the DisplayPort 1.4 Dual-Monitor KVM from Level1Techs.

Packaging and design

Before we get into the features, here are some quick impressions on the buying experience and delivery. The sale is done exclusively through Level1Techs store and the transaction was hassle free. For questions or changes to the order, the support helps quickly and friendly. Shipping was also relatively quick at 7 days from the US and at $38 USD totally acceptable by today’s standards.

The packaging is kept simple. It is immediately noticeable that this is a product for the enterprise market, no frills. On the white box there is only a single sticker that mentions all the important features again, illustrates an exemplary configuration and lists the different model variants. In addition to the model with the number PAAG-E3122B for 2 monitors, there are also variants for 1, 3 and 4 monitors, which accordingly have this number in the third last position of the product number.

If you now throw these product numbers into a search engine of your choice, you will relatively quickly find the website of Rextron, who also advertise the product, but do not offer it for sale to normal end customers. The reason for this is that Rextron is the OEM for the product, taking care of most of the manufacturing and certifications. Level1Techs then fine-tunes the product with special firmware and takes over the distribution for normal end customers in the form of the L1KVM. Especially for better device compatibility, Level1Techs have put a lot of energy and brainpower into this special firmware, which the Rextron version does not have.

The scope of delivery is also spartan. Besides the L1KVM itself, there is a 12V power supply, optionally an additional adapter for the required power socket standard, four self-adhesive rubber feet and the user manual.

The KVM switch itself is also kept minimalistic and focuses mainly on its functionality. On the front we find a USB 2.0 Type A HID (Human Interface Device) port, a USB 3.0 or USB 3.1 Gen1 port (henceforth just called USB 3.0), two white LED windows to indicate the active host system and a switch to toggle between the two host systems. The construction is made of black powder-coated steel and measures 55 x 160 x 100 mm. Of course, the lengths of the connected cables on the rear side still have to be taken into account.

Speaking of the rear panel, this is where the action is at. In addition to the power supply connector, there are three more USB 2.0 Type A HID ports here, which together with the two left Displayport ports, a 3.5 mm jack and the USB 3.0 Type A port on the far right form the console downlinks, where peripheral devices will later be connected. The 3.5 mm jack, display port and USB 3.0 type B ports in the middle and on the right, respectively, are the uplinks to which the host systems will later be connected.

Now this all sounds more complicated than it is, but the principle is simple. 2 PCs are connected with DP, USB and audio and the user can switch which of the two is controlled with the connected peripherals. On the bottom there is just a sticker with product, serial number and FCC certification and 4 stamped indentations for attaching the rubber feet.

Lade neue Kommentare

FritzHunter01

Moderator

211 Kommentare 136 Likes

@skullbringer danke für das Review! Sehr gut erklärt und ich denke, dass es für einige hier in der Community sehr hilfreich war... und, es ist zur Abwechslung mal ein ganz anderes Thema... Zumindest wurde hier nicht über Einhörner (GPUs) gesprochen! :ROFLMAO:

Grüße
FritzHunter

Antwort 2 Likes

Arnonymious

Mitglied

47 Kommentare 19 Likes

Danke für das schöne Review.
Wie schaut das eigentlich mit Eingabelatenzen aus? Zumindest bei meinem Schreibtisch wäre einer der Rechner die Mühle zum Zocken - fiese Latenzen wären also unfein.
Funktioniert GSync auch "durch" den KVM Switch hindurch?

Antwort Gefällt mir

G
Guest

Das wollte ich auch eben fragen. Gerade mit VSR gab es in der Vergangenheit bei KVMs doch immer wieder Probleme.

Antwort 1 Like

M
Moeppel

Urgestein

595 Kommentare 183 Likes

$440 sind natürlich eine absolute (und abschreckende ;) ) Ansage.

Umgerechnet wären das immer noch gut 320€ ohne MwSt. bzw. fast 400€ nach Import.

Bis Dato habe ich auf KVM Switches verzichtet, da die Spezifikationen meist unterirdischer Natur hinsichtlich ihrer Standards sind. Bei etwas wo L1Tech bzw. Wendell speziell involviert ist, mache ich mir dahingehenden nahezu keine Sorgen.

Allerdings hat mein Hauptpanel dann auch schon wieder [email protected]/165hz, was über der [email protected] Spezifikation liegt 😪

EDIT: DSC wird scheinbar unterstützt, heißt also das [email protected]/165hz kein Problem darstellen.

EDIT2: Bisweilen gibt's wohl auch andere 1.4 DP KVMs von bspw. DeLock für ca. 150€. Wie es hier hinsichtlich Sync aussieht, keine Ahnung.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
A
Anakyra

Mitglied

23 Kommentare 0 Likes

Ein stolzer Preis, zumal man bei Defekten immer das Problem mit dem im Ausland ansässigen Händler hat. Aber bestellbar ist das ganze derzeit auch nicht "sold out". Pre-order ab Mitte März wieder.
Die Vorteile gegenüber einem hier gekauften KVM Switch wie dem ATEN CS1922 halten sich auf dem Papier in Grenzen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

S
SaschaT

Mitglied

11 Kommentare 2 Likes

Wie wäre es mit einem Delock DisplayPort 1.4 KVM Switch 8K 30Hz mit USB 3.0 und Audio?
Für 160 € muss man aber logischerweise mit ein paar Abstrichen leben.

Antwort Gefällt mir

M
Moeppel

Urgestein

595 Kommentare 183 Likes

Auf den habe ich oben ebenfalls verwiesen.

Der KVM hat aber nur einen DP Out, somit wäre nur ein DP Endgerät, sprich Monitor ansteuerbar. Ob die HDMI und DP out gleichzeitig nutzbar sind, weiß ich nicht. Falls ja, wäre es vermutlich allensfalls eine Spiegelung statt Desktoperweiterung. Wäre zumindest meine Vermutung.

Sprich das ganze ist nur eingeschränkt vergleichbar, was dann auch möglicherweise die Preisdifferenz erklärt.

Antwort Gefällt mir

S
SaschaT

Mitglied

11 Kommentare 2 Likes

HDMI und DisplayPort lassen sich laut Datenblatt nicht gleichzeitig nutzen.

Dafür unterstütz der Display Port "MST"(Multi-Stream-Transport).
Über MST sollten z.B. 3 Displays mit UHD möglich sein, jedoch nur 1x60Hz und 2x30Hz

Kommt eben wie immer auf den Verwendungszweck und das verfügbare Budget an ;-)

Antwort 1 Like

skullbringer

Veteran

143 Kommentare 122 Likes

Danke, gute Hinweise! Tatsächlich funktioniert G-Sync und Adaptive Sync problemlos und auch Input Lag ist absolut gar keiner zu bemerken. Als langjähriger FPS-Spieler wäre mir das sofort aufgefallen.

Man bekommt hier wirklich vollwertiges Displayport 1.4, ohne Scaling, Konvertierung o.ä.. Von der Weiche im Kabel bekommen die Hostsysteme also effektiv nichts mit ;)

Antwort 1 Like

I
Irolas

Mitglied

12 Kommentare 4 Likes

Gibt es das Modell auch für den Anschluss an mehrere PCs? Wenn ich das richtig verstanden habe (bitte korrigieren, wenn ich da falsch liege), dann sind alle auf der Packung abgebildeten Geräte für nur zwei PCs, aber mehrere Monitore.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Xaver Amberger (skullbringer)

Werbung

Werbung