GPUs Notebooks Pro Reviews Workstations

Working and content creation with a notebook? In terms of Max-Q design, the GeForce RTX 3080 clearly beats the RTX 2080 Super!

Again Notebook Weeks at Igor’s Lab? Well, sort of yes and no, but I’ve now had the chance to at least take a longer inventory in direct comparison of two very similar notebooks, the one tested today containing the successor to the RTX 2080 Super Max-Q tested at the time. A notebook isn’t a desktop PC with a beast of a CPU and is also subject to thermal limits, so you have to find the perfect balance between CPU and GPU processing power.  This is then packed into a notebook that is as flat as possible with an ultra HD display and touch function.

The Razer Blade Pro 15 used for this with the GeForce RTX 3080 in Max-Q design (95 watt variant) and an Intel Core i7-10875H CPU (2.30 GHz) is interesting in that you get a fast, sensitive display for Ultra-HD on the one hand and it can also serve as a touch panel and drawing board on the other. For this, however, you have to accept reflections, which can be avoided by clever positioning. Furthermore, you have to come to terms with the flat design and the resulting lack of an Ethernet port. If you need to push a lot of large content to a media server or the NAS, you won’t be happy with the WiFi alone here and should rely on an external USB-C adapter with at least Gigabit Ethernet, like I did.

However, the Max-Q design should not be confused with a dedicated chip, even though it is the same silicon. So today it’s a GeForce RTX 3080 that has to operate with an extremely limited power limit. The only question that remains is what effects this will have in practice. But that’s exactly why I have today’s test, which is supposed to show exemplarily where the journey can go further in the future due to GPU support with AI and CUDA.

Notebooks with Dynamic Boost and Studio Certification

For all RTX Studio laptops, NVIDIA sets the bar relatively high, but not too high. At least a GeForce RTX 2060, an Intel Core i7 (H-series) or higher, at least 16 GB, a fast SSD of 512 GB or more and a decent display with Full HD or Ultra HD resolution are required. The fact that Intel CPUs are used exclusively at the moment is certainly also due to the fact that AMD Dynamic Boost, although open source, is unfortunately completely ignored.

Because it ends up being (the very well performing) counterpart to AMD’s SmartShift technology found in the Ryzen Mobile 4000 and 5000 APUs. Both technologies are designed to take advantage of the fact that in many laptop designs, the GPU and CPU share a thermal budget, typically because they are both cooled by the same set of heat pipes. In practice, this is typically done to allow OEMs to build relatively thin and light systems where the cooling capacity of the system is more than the TDP of either the CPU or the GPU alone, but less than the total TDP of those two processors combined.

This way OEMs, like Razer in this case, can develop optimally adapted profiles for different scenarios, where one or the other component is given more leeway. So if both processors share a common cooling system, why not increase their power limits and then intelligently divide the system’s thermal budget? Dynamic Boost is a generic solution that also works on multiple platforms, while AMD’s SmartShift is designed solely and proprietarily for the combination of AMD APUs and GPUs to push (and lock down) the AMD ecosystem and their platform control structure. So Dynamic Boost could be used with both Intel’s Core processors and AMD’s Ryzen processors, except AMD doesn’t want it to. So that’s why there’s only an Intel CPU in the Razer Blade Pro 17 and no Ryzen.

Drivers as a solid foundation: Studio Drivers vs. Game Ready

I’m not using the latest GameReady drivers for testing the notebook, but deliberately using NVIDIA’s Studio drivers. They don’t contain the latest game gimmicks, but they are stable and largely correspond to what NVIDIA provides for the Quadro cards, apart from the certified applications that (have to) rely on Quadro hardware. However, these drivers have been tested with many applications from the creative field, just as you would expect from workstation drivers. There’s also a new feature in GeForce Experience that automatically activates the right settings to maximize performance in creative apps. Currently, over 30 apps are supported, including Adobe Illustrator, Lightroom, Substance Designer, Autodesk AutoCAD, and DaVinci Resolve.

In the attached screenshot you can see the automatic optimization of the settings by configuring “GPU Processing Mode”, “Use GPU for Blackmagic RAW Decode” and “Use GPU for R3D” in DaVinci Resolve. With the optimal settings you can make sure that you can take full advantage of the studio products. Forgetting settings is, after all, a popular folk sport. And lest I forget, Resizeable BAR was available and active as well. Thanks to the last driver, just saw it and caught it. Up to 5% were feasible for suitable games, in the productive area the whitelist still has to be adapted or extended. It would certainly be worth it with the many textures to be loaded in many a studio app.

Test system and comparative values

The notebook was kindly provided by Razer and Notebooksbilliger on loan and has since been returned, so there were and are no obligations of any kind. It was important to create a portable counterpart to all the desktop solutions tested so far with a suitable product and to keep this comparable within the framework of the platforms used in each case, because my own notebook is unfortunately still based on an Intel CPU of the 9th generation. Generation and also Turing is not quite so starte-of-the-art anymore.

We still know the desktop system from all the other workstation tests in 2020:

Test System and Equipment
Hardware:

AMD Ryzen 9 5950X
MSI MEG X570 Godlike
2x 16 GB Patriot Viper Black RGB DDR4 3600
1x 2 TByte Aorus (NVMe System SSD, PCIe Gen. 4)
1x 500 GB Toshiba RC500
1x Seagate FastSSD Portable USB-C
Seasonic Prime 1300 Watt Titanium PSU

Cooling:
Alphacool Ice Block XPX Pro
Alphacool IEISWOLFf (modified)
Case:
Raijintek Paean
Monitor: BenQ PD3220U
OS: Windows 10 Pro (updated)

Lade neue Kommentare

g
gastello

Veteran

272 Kommentare 90 Likes

Das ist ein interessanter Artikel/Beitrag, mehr davon. Ich kanns bestätigen die 2080 kommt mit der 3080 nicht mit, aber der Energieverbrauch wird zum Problem, das Notebook hebt fast ab (thermisches Limit ist dabei nett ausgedrückt...:)).

External GPU Beistellboxen helfen da kaum ab, weil man zuviel der verfügbaren (Grafik-) Leistung über den Link verliert, der gegenüber einer integrierten dGPU deutlicher limitiert. Man kann nur ca. 70% der verfügbaren Leistung abrufen. Das Thema steckt noch in den Kinderschuhen. Da ist es sinnvoller lieber auf eine stärkere integrierte GPU zu setzen, nur sind die Dinger einfach nicht sparsam. Q-Max usw. waren/sind gebinnte Desktop Dies aus der gleichen Produktion. 95W in einer etwas schmaleren Slim Variante sind der Horror. Da kannst du am Luftauslass deine Kaffetasse warm halten...während dir der Lüfter ähnlich einem Fön den Nerv raubt und du kaum Zugriff auf ein Profil hast. Da hilft dann nur über das Energiepsparprofil ein Offset manuell zu setzen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Igor Wallossek

Format©

5,375 Kommentare 8,315 Likes

Es ging so. Für die Oberschenkel ist das nichts 😂

Antwort 1 Like

B
Biedermeyer

Mitglied

28 Kommentare 5 Likes

Ohne stabile RJ45-Verbindung wird das nix - wollen mit der Reduzierung wohl Apple nacheifern.
Den Trend, nach immer weniger Anschluessen verstehe ich nicht, ausser dass vermtl. nur nachgemacht wird, um ja keinen "Trend" zu verpassen...

Antwort Gefällt mir

Abductee

Veteran

227 Kommentare 30 Likes

Der RJ45 braucht im Geäuse halt relativ viel Platz, das ist dann einfach nem schlanken Gehäuse geschuldet das es den nicht mehr gibt.

Antwort Gefällt mir

e
eastcoast_pete

Veteran

149 Kommentare 30 Likes

Zunächst Mal: Danke für den Test!
Ich bin aktuell (immer noch) im Markt/auf der Suche nach meinem nächsten Laptop. Wie es im Englischen so schön heißt "slim pickings" im Moment, leider.
Über das Testgerät: Jetzt kann ich ja schon verstehen, daß ein dünnes Laptop besser aussieht, aber (ABER) bei so einem 3080 MaxQ wäre etwas mehr Dicke (so 3-5 mm) wirklich mehr gewesen. Damit wäre der Platz da für (von sehr wichtig bis weniger): Größere und bessere Heatsinks/Heatpipes, etwas tiefere Fans mit mehr Durchsatz damit der MaxQ nicht im Hitzestau zum Mini degradiert wird bzw nicht so Fön-Artig klingt, Platz für einen Ethernet Anschluss, und, wenn's 150-200 g mehr sein dürfen, auch eine etwas größere Batterie. Wenn es dieses Notebook dann doch noch mit einer 5700 oder besseren Cézanne oder einem 6 oder 8 Kern Tiger Lake* gibt, nehme ich auch meine Kreditkarte raus.
* Wenn Intel hier in 2021 zu Potte kommt.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Gurdi

Urgestein

1,001 Kommentare 513 Likes

Zu dem Thema befindet sich bereits etwas in Vorbereitung ;)

Antwort Gefällt mir

a
alles_alles

Urgestein

737 Kommentare 174 Likes

https://geizhals.de/?cat=nb&xf=1129...2_AMD~2379_15~6763_Ryzen+4000~6763_Ryzen+5000 So wie ich das sehe, hat sich die Problematik mit den 5000ern cpus in Luft aufgelöst weil es durchaus laptops mit NVIDIA und AMD gibt . Auch eine 3080

Antwort Gefällt mir

a
alles_alles

Urgestein

737 Kommentare 174 Likes

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
e
eastcoast_pete

Veteran

149 Kommentare 30 Likes

Wenn ich's richtig verstanden habe, ist das Problem mit AMD Ryzen CPUs und NVIDIA GPUs im Notebook nicht, daß es so nicht gibt, sondern das AMD CPUs (Renoir, Cézanne) nicht bei der dynamischen Aufteilung der TDP mitmachen können oder wollen. Gerade bei so einem Flachmann Notebook wie dem Razor hier ist die maximale Kühlleistung eben doch ziemlich begrenzt. Auch deswegen wäre mir ein etwas dickeres Chassis (extra 3-5 mm) auch lieber, da kommt eine größere Kühllösung besser unter.

Antwort Gefällt mir

P
Palmdale

Mitglied

60 Kommentare 16 Likes

@eastcoast_pete
Jop, so hab ich das im Text auch gelesen, allerdings mit definitivem "Nicht wollen". Was bei AMD als sonst quelloffener Standardfreund eher irritiert, oder man möchte analog Intelgebahren seine gewonnene Stärke gleich mal ins Proprietäre auswalzen...

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung