GPUs Graphics Reviews

Various binnings in NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 4070 – MSRP cards with unintended OC feature and the technical background (of Boost) | Exclusive

I noticed especially in the so-called MSRP cards of NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 4070 that NVIDIA still does intensive binning and here two quality gradations (“buckets”) are again quite restrictive selected in bin 0 (worse) and bin 1 (better). We still know this from the so-called “Non-A” and “A” chips in NVIDIA’s higher-class Turing cards. Different name, same topic. Whereby now with this article really the question arises, with which I should start best: the practice and how I found it or the not less exciting theory behind it, which one needs for the better understanding.

After some deliberation, I decided to start with the examination as an introduction, because tomorrow’s test of an “affected” card needs today’s article for a better understanding of the circumstances. In the end, NVIDIA has scored a kind of brute own goal and some board partners have, quite legally, been able to turn the board partner cards, which are actually equipped with a restrictive power limit, into OC cards in disguise. The customer is happy, of course, but the other parties involved, up to NVIDIA, probably not so much.

 

Two-class society for the AD104-250-A1

Actually, I’m a bit surprised that nobody has noticed so far that so-called MSRP cards (i.e. the cheap entry-level models of the respective manufacturers) are available with a fixed power limit (default/enforced and maximum) of 200 watts as well as with 215 watts. All OC cards, on the other hand, have a much higher maximum value, but it has to be exhausted manually. But why do the non-OC cards have different power limits? Let’s first look at two MSRP cards with different fixed values (sliders):

200 Watt BIOS
215 Watt BIOS

 

But what I could find out from my sources is that there is (of course) the usual binning of the chips, although you can’t see this determination externally by now. NVIDIA has of course learned from the last shitstorm with the “A-chips”. You need NVIDIA’s own programs like MODS (NVIDIA Modular diagnostic software), which then output the so-called binning value bin with a hidden command line call. But since these things are classified as “Confidential”, for legal and collegial reasons I will neither offer a download of the actual software, nor disclose the parameter. It is enough to know that such a thing exists.

Palit RTX 4070 Dual with good bin 1 chip and 200 watt BIOS

Now I don’t want to anticipate the next paragraphs on the following page, of course, but the binned chips usually fulfill a certain function. Each chip model has a maximum power specification, which is called TGP (also known as Total GPU Power), i.e. the value that the GPU is allowed to consume as such. This is usually set as a fixed value. Depending on the chip quality, different high frequencies are then possible with the same power consumption and under identical conditions, such as the temperature, among others. Therefore, you will only be able to get an entry-level model from a manufacturer with the same power limit to the same clock frequencies in a few exceptional cases. This has been done for years and has never really been criticized. You get what you paid for. Very simple.

 

With the GeForce RTX 4070, NVIDIA initially counted on either significantly higher sales numbers or a lower yield (or maybe even both) and simply reversed that with the binning and clock! Ergo, all MSRP cards should achieve about the same clock under load, regardless of chip quality. My internal information (and counter tests) say that for clock rates around 2745 MHz under full load (gaming) at around 60 °C “edge” temperature you need between 195 watts and just under 212 watts, depending on chip grade. Hence, the separation into two groups up to 200 and 215 watts. So far, so unspectacular.

KFA2 RTX 4070 EX Gamer with good bin 1 chip and 215 Watt BIOS

OC card against its will (the manufacturer)

And this is where it gets really funny. Some board partners, who finished very early with the cards, have to deal with the worse bin 0 Chips for the MSRP cards and used the 215 watt BIOS (and left it that way just in case). It’s just that NVIDIA has predominantly used bin 1 Chips, which could then have already reached the desired (preset) clock at 200 watts. I did this counter test with the KFA2 RTX 4070 EX Gamer from tomorrow’s test and set the power target to 200 watts with the Afterburner. Running…

In return, I was able to overclock the card quite a bit (which shouldn’t be intended this way). With a 250 MHz offset, the extremely well cooled card managed to reach the 3 GHz mark. Mind you: as an actual MSRP model! Who should then still buy all the expensive OC models, which have maybe one or two (actually unnecessary) voltage converters more instead of eight (Founders Edition six) and rely on the 12VHPWR connection? Now, of course, such a lucky find is not guaranteed and the next batch of delivered bundles of chip and memory could already look completely different. But at least I have not been told that NVIDIA would intentionally downgrade the binning flags, because then you would have to change a lot more. I’ll explain what that is in the second part in a moment.

But even OC cards use the 215 watts as a lower limit. I had the MSI GeForce RTX 4070 Gaming X Trio in review as well, and this card ultimately failed just as much at the stable 3 GHz (aside from momentary spikes), despite the maximum power limit of even 240 watts. The card came with the bin 1 Chip even at maximum clock only just over 215 watts. The 240 watts might have been needed to get a worse bin 0 Chip into similar regions.

And what is the result of all the BIOS limits now? MSRP cards with a 215 watt power limit currently have a great chance of being used as real OC cards as long as the bin 1 chips are installed! But of course there is no guarantee for that, how could there be? NVIDIA’s yield seems to be much better than expected and there are probably too many chips still on stock to select for binning. That was part one of today’s article and tomorrow you can see how such a “non-OC card” with the normal overclocking on the level of the usual, much more expensive OC cards performs! The next page will be a bit more technical, but certainly not less interesting. So please turn the page and read on!

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

o
openyoureyes76

Mitglied

27 Kommentare 10 Likes

Wie lässt sich da dann die FE mit ihren 220 W Powerlimit einstufen? Verwendet man da dann auch eher einen besseren Bin 1 Chip?

Antwort Gefällt mir

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,460 Kommentare 819 Likes

Danke, interessanter Hintergrund Artikel, und wieder einmal Fakten, die man woanders eher nicht findet. Verdacht bzw Vermutung: NVIDIA hat die relative Ausbeute von guten (Bin 1) GPU Chips weit unterschätzt, weil sie ihre Annahmen für die Ausbeute (Bin 1 <-> Bin 0) auf den (schlechten) Erfahrungen mit Samsung VLSI basierten. TSMC scheint ihre EUV Fertigungsknoten eben doch weit besser im Griff zu haben.
Und, zum Thema "Speedo": Bis dato habe ich da eher an die australische Badeklamottenfirma gedacht (https://www.speedo.com). Vielleicht haben sich NVIDIAs Ingenieure ja auch davon inspirieren lassen, als sie ihre Regulierung so benannten. Die superglatten Schwimmanzüge (zuerst von Speedo für Schwimm WMs und Olympiaden entwickelt, Adidas zog bald nach) waren vor ~ 23 Jahren heiß diskutiert, als die Rekorde deshalb nur so purzelten.

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,176 Kommentare 18,759 Likes

Es ist eine OC Karte, das Power Target steht bei 200 Watt. Bin 1

Antwort 1 Like

RX480

Urgestein

1,860 Kommentare 853 Likes

Hat die FE vom Typ her andere Spawas, so das nur 6 statt 8 reichen?

Welche "schlechten" 215W-Modelle sind dann eigentlich gut bestückt mit 8 Spawas und taugen die was?
(das die Chancen auf bin1 so gut stehen, ist mal ne gute Nachricht für OCer für lau, ... gefällt mir)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,176 Kommentare 18,759 Likes

Wer meine Tests liest, der weiß, dass nur OnSemi oder A&O verbaut sind (Bis auf Asus, die nehmen meist Vishay von den Billig-Motherboards). Theoretisch reichen auch noch 4 Phasen. Jede weitere Phase senkt die Grundlast pro Phase etwas und entzerrt vor allem die thermischen Hotspots. Man kann unterm Strich günstigere SpaWas verbauen und ist trotzdem noch effizienter. Deswegen bekomme ich bei den ganzen Listen, welche Karte "gut" oder "schlecht" bestückt ist, jedes Mal einen Lachanfall. Man sieht an solchen Laien-Urteilen, wessen Marketing aufgeht (z.B. Asus). Gefährliches Halbwissen, wenn man nur in die Spec-Sheets guckt, aber weder Schaltfrequenz noch Layout berücksichtigt. :D

Manchmal ist ein gut gekühlter "Billig"-DrMOS um Welten effizienter als ein High-End Power Stage, der mangels guter Wärmeabfuhr viel heißer wird. Ohne dies alles zu kennen, kann man doch kein Urteil fällen.

Morgen kommt die KFA2 RTX 4070 EX Gamer. Brutale Kühlung, 8 Phasen und 215 Watt BIOS. Meine Retail-Karte hat den bin 1 Chip und geht mit OC bis 3 GHz. Das war auch der Auslöser für den Artikel heute

Antwort 6 Likes

Perdakles

Mitglied

42 Kommentare 20 Likes

Danke Igor für diese lehrreiche Morgenlektüre. Sehr interessant. So detaillierte Artikel mit so vielen Hintergrundinformationen findet man sonst einfach nirgendwo. (y) :geek:

Antwort 2 Likes

Derfnam

Urgestein

7,517 Kommentare 2,029 Likes

Mal davon ab, dass du sicher die olympischen Spiele meinst: die Dinger wurden gerüchteweise zuerst von einem chinesischen Geschwisterpaar ausgiebig getestet und um die und das zu würdigen war der ursprünglich geplante Name 'Speedoping'. Zum Glück hatten die ne gute Praktikantin: Miss Understanding.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,176 Kommentare 18,759 Likes

Speedo ist ein Recht gebräuchlicher Begriff aus der Halbleitertechnik und der Rennszene 😎🫵

Antwort Gefällt mir

o
openyoureyes76

Mitglied

27 Kommentare 10 Likes

Ich hab noch nicht ganz verstanden warum gerade KFA2 jetzt das 215 W Bios bei der "Standard"-Karte verbaut. War man der Meinung einen "schlechten" Bin 0 Chip zu erhalten und wollte die Karte trotzdem mit höherem Takt betreiben?

Eine weitere Frage die sich für mich stellt: wenn jetzt alle Chips so "individuell" gesteuert werden, sind dann nicht die ganzen Tests immer nur für genau diese eine jeweilige Karte wirklich aussagekräftig? Es dürfte dann ja auch innerhalb der Bin-Einstufungen noch zu Unterschieden kommen. Die tatsächliche Spieleleistung im Standardbetrieb wird sich nicht unterscheiden, aber die Stromaufnahme und in weitere Folge das Lüftergeräusch können da schon je nach Qualität des Chips anders sein. Oder hab ich da etwas falsch verstanden? Mir ist schon klar, daß hier Platinenlayout, Kühlsystem, Lüfteranzahl auch eine Rolle spielen, aber diese sind ja bei jeder Karte eines Typs diesselben - da sollte es keine großen Veränderungen geben. Nur die Chipqualität kann dann doch recht abweichend sein. Oder seh ich das falsch bzw. zu extrem?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,176 Kommentare 18,759 Likes

Steht eigentlich im Artikel. Manche haben die Untergrenze auf 215 Watt gesetzt, zur Sicherheit, weil man am Anfang nicht so recht wusste, was im Detail dann kommt. Andere haben mit Bin 1 gerechnet.

Das mit den Unterschieden der Karte habe ich doch auch erklärt. Die Hersteller kaufen für die Modelle eine bestimmte Qualität (Bucket), dann sind diese Karten innerhalb der Reihe in etwa gleich. Deshalb schreibe ich aber auch immer, dass es Toleranzen gibt und die ganzen Nachkommastellen eigentlich Augenwischerei sind. :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

o
openyoureyes76

Mitglied

27 Kommentare 10 Likes

Auch auf die Gefahr hin, daß diese Frage schon beantwortet wurde, aber wäre es zukünftig vielleicht möglich diese Powerlimit doch irgendwie anzupassen oder ist das fix hinterlegt ohne jegliche Chance auf Veränderung?

Theoretisch müsste dann ja eine MSI Gaming X Trio mit 240 W Powerlimit UND einem sehr guten Bin 1 Chip doch merkbare Vorteile im OC bieten oder?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,176 Kommentare 18,759 Likes

Auch das steht im Artikel. Mehr als 215 Watt braucht die nicht, weil man dann schon ins Spannungs-Limit läuft. Ist auf Seite 2 doch extrem ausführlich erklärt. Speedo und VFE :)

Diese Gaming X Trio und die KFA2 EX Gamer rennen bei 3 GHz ins Voltage limit. Power Limits sind fest in der Firmware hinterlegt.

Antwort Gefällt mir

big-maec

Urgestein

827 Kommentare 475 Likes

So was aber auch jetzt habe ich mir den Artikel durchgelesen und bin neugierig geworden auf MODS und MATS. Werde mir mal einen bootstick machen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,176 Kommentare 18,759 Likes

Na du aber auch, das ist doch verboten :D

Antwort 1 Like

Nulight

Veteran

220 Kommentare 146 Likes

Insgesamt eine wirklich interessante Geschichte, dabei freue ich mich immer wieder, wenn zum Beispiel die KFA2 4090 bei 80% Powerlimit, bei 59 C* Hotspot mit 2790 taktet, zu 2745 bei 100% Powerlimit. ( Wobei sie 100 % ja eigentlich gar nicht braucht. )
Da stimme ich Igor vollkommen zu, dass eine sehr gute Kühlung, quasi OC für lau ist. 👍🏼

Antwort Gefällt mir

big-maec

Urgestein

827 Kommentare 475 Likes

Hab schon mal geschaut man findet ja einiges und auch für Reparatuzwecke wohl brauchbar. Im Internet ist ja einiges vorhanden mit How-to's und Videos, zu verlockend.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,176 Kommentare 18,759 Likes
LurkingInShadows

Urgestein

1,348 Kommentare 550 Likes

das klingt für mich irgendwie nach AMDs Ansatz.... "wir fahren 2,5GHz, und schauen dann wieviel wir dabei verbrauchen" und nicht mehr wie NV immer meinte "wir verbrauchen 200W und schauen wie schnell wir werden"

Antwort Gefällt mir

m
meilodasreh

Urgestein

572 Kommentare 284 Likes

solche Artikel sind immer der Moment, wo ich mich diebisch freu,
weil ich besagtes Stück hardware zufälligerweise verbaut habe...aber trotzdem nie auch nur ansatzweise dran rumfummel.
Es genügt mir, daß ich könnte 😄

Antwort 1 Like

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung