Data Storage Practice Pro Reviews Server & Services SSD & HDD Storage Storage drives

Synology DS923 NAS in practice test – Very good all-rounder with many advantages, but almost nothing works without extensions

Synology’s DS923 has already been on the market for a year, whereas they already took their time with the DS920. By the way, long product cycles are more of an advantage than a disadvantage in my opinion, because the product and software mature without blind haste. With an AMD Ryzen R1600 as the main processor, four drive bays, two M.2 slots and two Gigabit network ports, the Synology DS923 presented itself as the first model of the 2023 generation back then and it is still no old iron today. And it’s supposed to replace my almost 5 year old QNAP TS-251B, which is really getting on my nerves by now. You’ll find out why in a moment.

Old and new: QNAP vs. Synology

There is also the option to use 10 Gigabit Ethernet and to upgrade any number of other components analogous to DLCs. Which brings us to the title. At just under 600 Euros, the basic version of the Synology D923 is anything but cheap, although you only get a really bare basic version for it. The installed 4 GB of working memory are puny and outdated, a missing SSD cache should be added and the hard drives have to be bought anyway.

However, the 10 GBit/s connection is also missing, which is actually incomprehensible for such an expensive system. All these things I have of course retrofitted and the Ethernet expansion card I will describe in a second part, because it is more important than you think. The DS 923 is certainly already overkill for home users, but for a small business like mine, such a part is actually just right. Always provided that one pays again for the most important extensions. That you should also buy components labeled on Synology, well, yes. At least with the network card, there was no other way.

The use case is important

What I need is a comfortable NAS with enough storage for my website backups (parallel to the data center), as a direct drive for the raw data from the oscillographs and the huge PNGs plus analyses from the Keyence VHX-7000, for all the images from my photo studio in RW format, all YouTube movies including raw material (also as a destination for recording in OBS), as a photo cloud for all the iPhones and a solution as a private data grave for the family with differently equipped user accounts and online accesses.

All of that would be possible with the QNAP system in the end with a lot of rebuilding, but on the one hand, I’m annoyed by all the updates, where a new version also likes to open up new or old holes, and on the other hand, the installed processor is now only grotty lame for the increased tasks, the memory is difficult to expand and the fan is already whistling noisily on the last hole. Especially since the whole system was simply too small in terms of performance.

What is a NAS and what is it suitable for?

But let’s briefly go back to the basics. A Network Attached Storage (NAS) is a dedicated file server that provides centralized storage on a network. This allows users like me to access their rather large data from different devices. At its core, a NAS consists of an enclosure containing hard drives, supported by a processor and RAM. It runs a specialized operating system that has a web-based user interface. This operating system is optimized for storing and sharing files and often uses specialized file systems like ZFS or Btrfs, which are designed for large amounts of data and redundancy.

For users like me, a NAS brings many advantages. It provides a central location to store all personal data, making it easy to access from any device on the network. Thanks to features like RAID configurations, the data on a NAS is often more secure because it provides redundancy that prevents data loss in the event of a hard drive failure. Another benefit is the ability to create automatic backups from different devices. This ensures that personal data is always protected and up-to-date. Many modern NAS systems can also act as media servers, which allows streaming music, movies and photos to various devices. Some users will also appreciate the ability to access their data from outside their home network. Finally, compared to traditional computers, NAS systems are often more energy efficient, which can result in cost savings on electricity bills.

Scope of delivery and functionality

Despite the high price, the scope of delivery first turns out to be practical, but unfortunately also somewhat modest. The NAS case comes well packaged with a power adapter, a few screws, two Kensington keys, two Ethernet cables and a small quick-start guide, but that’s about it. What isn’t built in has to be purchased. I already described what happened to me with the RAM in a Friday article, but it has nothing to do with Synology. The assembly and retrofitting I will comment in more detail in separate chapters.

The DS923 presented today appears to be an updated version of the DS920, which also indicates the long period of time during which no update was released. Both devices have features like 4 GB of RAM, four storage bays, two Gigabit network connections, two USB 3.0 interfaces and an eSATA port. However, the newer model, the DS923 , uses DDR4 ECC SODIMM RAM, a memory type with error detection capability, as opposed to the traditional DDR4 SODIMM in the DS920 . We’ll see why this is important and what I upgraded in a moment.

With dimensions of 166 × 199 × 223 mm, the DS923 weighs 2.24 kg without contents. On its front, in addition to the power on/off switch, there is also a USB port and five LEDs that indicate the status of the NAS and its storage media. The Disk Station Manager (DSM) 7.2 serves as the operating system on the Synology DS923 . This operating system is characterized by its wide range of features, setting options, and most importantly, its ease of use, which makes it a standout feature of Synology’s NAS devices. Many other vendors, especially the cheaper ones, struggle to live up to this standard, making the difference stand out. And it was also one of the reasons I chose the DS923.

 

While the DS920 still uses the Intel Celeron J4125, the DS923 is equipped with the more powerful AMD Ryzen R1600 from the embedded range. Although a successor in the form of the Ryzen Embedded R2000 series actually already existed before the release, Synology uses the R1000 series, which includes the R1600 and thus the original first Zen cores. These can reach speeds of up to 3.1 GHz in Turbo mode. Interestingly, the Ryzen R1600 is the only model in this series without an integrated graphics chip. Depending on the configuration, the R1600 can have a thermal power dissipation (TDP) of between 12 and 25 watts, and you cannot tell which preset was used in the system either. The processor unit has eight PCIe connections, whereby the exact distribution is not specified in the DS923. In terms of memory, the R1600, manufactured in the FP5 package, has an L2 cache of 1 MB and an L3 cache of 4 MB.

The DS923 supports various network protocols like SMB, NFS, AFP, FTP, SFTP and WebDAV for directory sharing. It also offers rsync for data synchronization across multiple sites. Users can quickly find indexed files through a global search. The Hybrid Share feature allows less frequently used data to be stored in the Synology cloud, which comes at a cost. Synology also offers Active Backup Suite, a free backup solution for other Diskstation devices, Windows and Linux physical systems, VMs and cloud accounts.

Another differentiator is the ability (and actually the compulsion) to expand. Synology has built into the DS923 a special slot for the E10G22-T1 mini-module, a network upgrade tool that supports 10GbE connections. This module is adapted to a specific PCIe 3.0 x2 slot on the back of the device. Since there is no general PCIe slot, other expansion options are limited. i will describe that in a separate article, because i need more throughput. By the way, the two 92 mm fans installed at the back are relatively quiet, so I spared myself a replacement.

The DS923’s chassis has room for four drives inside, either 3.5- or 2.5-inch hard drives or SSDs with SATA connectors. Two M.2 NVMe SSDs can be added to the bottom of the unit, either as a fast cache or to expand SSD storage, as interestingly, the DS923 can also use M.2 SSDs to form storage clusters. Nevertheless, I will not use the feature for now, but only upgrade two SSDs as cache, as already known. But I will come to the installation and modification later.

There are two RAM slots with a capacity of up to 32 GB, but my device unfortunately only had 4 GB RAM ex-factory. Network connectivity is via two 1 Gbit/s LAN ports, which can also be configured as redundant ports. A PCIe slot (behind the flap in the picture above) on the back allows the installation of a 10 GBit/s module. A USB 3.2 Gen1 port is also present, as well as an eSATA port for connecting to an expansion chassis. That should suffice as a short introduction for now, because you’ll learn the rest appropriately and together with the respective chapter content when it comes to assembly, commissioning and configuration. For the curious, there is of course a look into the manual:

DS923p_HIG_ger

 

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,461 Kommentare 819 Likes

Bin gespannt auf die Fortsetzung! Und zum Thema HDD Geräusche: die "Synology" sind ja Toshiba HDDs, und die sind akustisch scheinbar allgemein nicht gerade zurückhaltend. Habe selbst auch 2 davon; richtig Radau machen sie nicht, aber flüstern geht anders. Als es HGST noch gab (jetzt Teil von WD), waren die meine erste Wahl, wenn ich welche für nicht allzu viel Geld kriegen konnte. Nach dem "Deathstar" Debakel von jetzt schon mindestens ~ 15 Jahren waren die HGSTs auch sehr zuverlässig.

Antwort Gefällt mir

echolot

Urgestein

924 Kommentare 722 Likes

Danke Igor mit der Bitte um weitere Berichterstattung. Funktioniert so etwas gut für ein kleineres Büro mit drei bis fünf Mitarbeitern? Datenmengen halten sich in Grenzen. Mehr Papier in Datenform, kein Videostreaming. Internetverbindung 1000/50.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,178 Kommentare 18,761 Likes

Ich würde schon sagen, dass das auch mit mehreren Nutzern ganz ordentlich funktioniert. Ich habe z.B. keine Bedenken, auch meine Kids darauf loszulassen, denn man kann ja genügend Benutzer anlegen und deren Rechte sauber verwalten. Aktuell hängen hier 5 Systeme im Backup und jeder User hat sein eigenes kleines Ökosystem. Der Vorteil gegenüber dem QNAP ist der DSM und das wirklich aufgeräumte GUI. Das betrifft auch den PC Client.

Ich habe bestimmte Dinge auch fürs gemeinsame Arbeiten freigegegeben, so hatte ich für die Kids ein eigenes Projekt angelegt, wo sie sich genüsslich austoben und gemeinsam arbeiten können. Es spart mir hier einen dedizierten Server, was wiederum echt Strom spart. Multimedia geht, aber wir nutzen nur Audio und eigene Bilder bzw. Handy-Videos. Da lasse ich für jeden in der Family seine eigene Cloud laufen, das klappt über Android genauso gut, wie unter iOS. Allerdings nehme ich da nicht die Synology Apps, sondern was gekauftes.

View image at the forums

Antwort 3 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,178 Kommentare 18,761 Likes

Das Klackern ist schon etwas nervig, ja. Aber die Ironwolf aus dem QNAP waren mindestens genauso laut. Die hatten auch ein eher Turbo-artiges Geräusch beim Dauerschreiben, das ist hier nicht so dominant. Aber es sind nun mal mechanische Festplatten. Groß dämmen kann man da auch nichts. Ich werde das Teil in den Korridor auslagern, muss vorher nur noch ein paar Meter CAT6A zum Switch verlegen.

Antwort 1 Like

N
NilsHG

Mitglied

84 Kommentare 51 Likes

Vielen Dank für Deinen Artikel zur DS 923+. Ich habe dieses NAS schon lange im Warenkorb, ebenso wie ein QNAP TS-464 (gleiche Gewichtsklasse). Du schreibst vom aufgeräumteren System (DSM) gegenüber QNAP als Vorteil. Ich habe bisher kein fertig NAS, bin aber vom Hardware Lock-In von Synology abgeschreckt. Auch gibt es, mMn, "mehr" Hardware fürs Geld von QNAP gegenüber Synology.
Da du Qnap schon kanntest, warum also nicht auf ein stärkeres NAS umsteigen? Der Intel Jasper Lake ist morderner und sparsamer als der Ryzen Embedded R1600. Welche Vorteile bringt der Ryzen für dich noch mit?

Antwort 1 Like

g
goch

Veteran

470 Kommentare 180 Likes

Wenn ich es auf Anhieb richtig sehe auf deren Homepage, scheint es die 10GbE Schnittstelle nicht als SFP+ Variante zu geben. Das finde ich sehr schade, wenn man es in einer KMU als Backup System nutzen will.
Da ist mit ein NAS mit Online USV und Glas Uplink deutlich lieber.
Schreibst du im nächsten Test noch etwas zur Ransomware Protection, was sich Synology da hat einfallen lassen?
Wir leider auch bei NAS Systemen im KMU und Privat-Sektor mehr :(

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,178 Kommentare 18,761 Likes

Kurz zu QNAP:

Die Windows-Software ist eine Pest. Ich hatte es sehr oft, dass mir das Ding Verzeichnisse und sogar frisch geschriebene Dateien gesperrt hat, weil es glaubte, auf Teufel komm raus alles sofort synchronisieren zu müssen. Ich habe oft genug meine Chartsgrafiken exportiert, Fehler gesehen und behoben, wollte die alten Dateien schnell noch mal überschreiben und bin mit dem QNAP kollidiert. Manchmal kamen gefühlt alle 3 bis 4 Tage Firmware-Updates, dann wieder lange nichts. Allein das Hoch- und Runterfahren hat mich Lebenszeit gekostet. Ich finde die UI potthässlich und zerklüftet, aber das mag Geschmacksache sein.

Das mit dem Hardware-Lock ist ärgerlich, aber ich denke, ich kann auf den NVMe Datenpool ganz gut verzichten. Der Cache hat mich bisher vollends überzeugt. Wenn man unbedingt NVMe RAIDs nutzen will, dann muss man ein anders NAS kaufen.

Und ich wollte mal was anderes als Intel. Nenne es Neugier oder potentiellen Masochismus. Allerdings ist bis jetzt alles paletti. SFP+ wäre eine nette Geschichte, das könnte Synology ohne großen Aufwand parallel auch als Karte anbieten. Nur muss es denen mal erst mal einer so hinbasteln. :D

Antwort 2 Likes

g
goch

Veteran

470 Kommentare 180 Likes

Ist halt ein selbst gelegtes Ei - mit einer Standard NIC statt dem Prioritäten Ansatz wäre das schnell umgesetzt ;)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,178 Kommentare 18,761 Likes

LWL muss man erst mal verlegen, das wäre hier mindestens zwei Nummern zu groß. Eine große USV kommt allerdings noch, da landen dann Glasfasermodem, FritzBox, Switch und NAS dran. Das werde ich wohl mit einem Balkonkraftwerk koppeln, mal sehen. Alles eine reine Zeitfrage. :D

Keine Ahnung, wer denen die Ryzen-Platine hingezimmert hat. Das wäre mal eine interessante Aufgabe, alles zu analysieren. Ich überlege grade, ob ich mit dem USB 3.0 noch was frickeln kann.

Antwort 1 Like

C
CKBVB

Mitglied

75 Kommentare 36 Likes

Moin,

immer wieder schön zu sehen, dass du auch abseits des klassischen Mainstreams Produkte testest und selbst nutzt. Das 923+ ist ja schon der maximale Overkill für den privaten Endanwender, wir nutzen es hier auch betrieblich. RAM Upgrade haben wir auch schon gemacht, SSD Cache habe ich bisher nicht als notwendig erachtet, da hier im Büro tatsächlich eine reine Datensicherungsfunktion erfüllt wird, uns war vor allem der 10GBE Port wichtig, da die Datenbestände mittlerweile in den TB Bereich wandern, kann so eine Verbindung ja nie schnell genug sein und durch Ethernet stehen Server und NAS auch räumlich getrennt voneinander.

Du hast den in meinen Augen wirklich interessantesten Punkt an der Synology Front (zumindest im KMU Bereich) leider nur angedeutet, Active Backup. In meinen Augen ist das ein absolutes KO Kriterium für den betrieblichen Bereich, denn neben den BackUp Funktionen für virtuelle Maschinen (die beeindruckend schnell und gut funktioniert) ist die kostenlose Bereitstellung eines Office 365 Backups in meinen Augen derzeit konkurenzlos, dazu kann man im Web-Menü die Postfächer durchsuchen und und und! Gerade wenn man bedenkt, wie teuer (das wird woanders nach Nutzeranzahl behandelt und bei 100 Nutzern kommen da oftmals einige hundert Euro je Monat zusammen) diese Funktion woanders ist, sind die 600 EUR für das Synology quasi geschenkt.

P.S.
@Igor Wallossek hast du schonmal dran gedacht Link Aggregation zu aktivieren? Meine gerade wenn du mehrere Datenströme hast, müsste der Standard Modus eine Verbesserung bringen, bei den besseren Modi braucht es dagegen immer einen Switch der das auch kann

Was heißt für dich "große USV"? Wenn du eine echte USV meinst, schau dich mal bei den Kollegen PowerWalker um, die haben für echt günstige Preise recht großzügig dimensionierte Online-USVs die in meinen Augen die Hälfte von normalen USVs der beiden großen Hersteller kosten, aber nach aktuellem Stand eben keine kürzere Halbwertzeit haben. Wir haben hier grds. zwei USVs parallel im Einsatz und mit den Kollegen APC schaffen wir immer so um die 3-5 Jahre, bis die USV anzeigt, dass die Akkus hinüber sind. Die erste PowerWalker läuft jetzt knapp 2 1/2 Jahre und zeigt im Menü noch 95% Kapazität an (wie weit man diesen Angaben trauen darf?) Wir haben hier die Modelle VI 3000 RT HID im Einsatz und sind bisher absolut zufrieden.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
C
CKBVB

Mitglied

75 Kommentare 36 Likes

So ein Ding kostet dann was? Dazu sehe ich den Sinn hinter einer USV am NAS nur sehr begrenzt, denn am NAS geht es selten um Hochverfügbarkeit, sondern meist um reine Datensicherung, bei richtigem Umgang und Nutzung und Konfiguration bleiben Daten auch ohne USV erhalten. Dazu kann man ja recht problemlos eine USV dran pappen!

Dazu ist SFP in meinen Augen nicht mehr als eine gute Idee im KMU Umfeld, aktuell sehe ich wieder wie kompliziert und unnötig teuer SFP ist. Im Rechenzentrum ist das sicher eine gute Sache, aber im KMU Umfeld (vieleicht im größeren KMU) mit zwei bis drei Servern funktioniert das auch alles ganz gut mit RJ45 Verbinder, ist weniger störanfällig, einfacher zu handhaben usw.!

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,178 Kommentare 18,761 Likes

Man muss einfach mal die Geräteklasse und den Use Case im Auge behalten sowie die Kirche im Dorf lassen. :D

Für meine Daten ist das mehr als ausreichend und mal im Ernst - die 10 GBE brauche ich nur für paralleles Arbeiten. Der Cache kann da Vieles vor den lahmeren HDDs abfedern und zwischenspeichern, sonst hätte ich mir die Mühe damit ja nicht gemacht. Aber wenn ich hochaufgelöste Mikroskopie speichern und gleichzeitig was anderes auf bis zu 5 Systemen sichern will, dann habe ich einfach keine Lust, mich da in die schmale Leitung reinteilen zu müssen. Es sind ja immer nur zeitlich begrenzte Peaks, die entstehen, keine Dauerlasten bei der vollen Bandbreite. Dafür sollte es schon ausreichen.

Die DS923+ ist nichts fürs echte KMU-Umfeld. Sie reicht für Kleinunternehmen wie meins allerdings mehr als aus. Für die Mails den FTP und die Webseite gibts bei mir eh das Rechenzentrum, das hier im Labor und Büro ist aus Netzwerksicht eher der ländliche Raum und kein Ballungsgebiet. :D

Antwort 1 Like

R
RazielNoir

Veteran

331 Kommentare 108 Likes

Reifegrad bei NAS in allen Ehren, aber nachdem die letzten MB-Generationen recht häufig 2.5GbE haben und 10GBaseT nicht unerschwinglich ist, darf bei dem Preis auch mehr als 1GbE verbaut sein. Aber das ist leider die letzten Jahre immer mehr so bei den Fertiganbietern feststellbar:

QNAP: Hardware ok, Os & Software eher meh, Sicherheit mau.
Synology: Hardware meh, OS gut, Software naja---
Terramaster: Hardware gut, Software rudimentär,
Austor: nett.... und sonst?

den Rest vergisst man besser. Zumindest was in D ohne Probleme erhältlich ist

Antwort Gefällt mir

c
cunhell

Urgestein

548 Kommentare 503 Likes

Beim QNAP musst Du aufpassen. Das TS-464 hat bei neueren Revisionen 8GB fest verbauten RAM ohne Aufrüstmöglichkeit. Nur das 4GB hat noch SO-Dimms, ist aber teuerer als mit 8GB. Könnte mir vorstellen, dass es die 4GB Variante nur noch kurz gibt.

Cunhell

Antwort 1 Like

Klicke zum Ausklappem
C
CKBVB

Mitglied

75 Kommentare 36 Likes

Würde ich nicht sagen, bzw. deutlich eingrenzen. KMU ist ja ein extrem dehnbar Begriff, von 0 EUR Umsatz bis hin zu 50Mio Umsatz.

Gerade im BackUp Bereich wird es quasi schon totaler Overkill sein für 50% der unter KMU zusammengefasste Unternehmen. Aber nur Wortdefinition
Mach mal aus Spaß Mindfactory auf und suche nach 2,5GbE Switch und die verkauften Stückzahlen. Denke, dass 99% der aktuell verbauten Ports noch im Gigabit laufen, da schlicht Fritz und Co gar nicht genug anbieten. Es gibt aktuell eine FritzBox mit einem mickrigen 2,5Gbe LAN Port.

Antwort 2 Likes

g
goch

Veteran

470 Kommentare 180 Likes

Ob ich einen 10GbE SFP+ oder BaseT Port verbaue, ist quasi kostenneutral. Die meisten brauchbaren, managed Switches haben auch einen 10GbE Uplink Port - man muss deswegen ja nicht direkt alles mit 10GbE ausstatten.

Bzgl der USV Frage verstehe ich dich glaube nicht komplett. Ich meine eine Online USV welche VOR das NAS geschaltet wird. Sinn: Die Online USV nimmt das NAS vom Stromnetz und schützt es so recht effektiv vor Überspannung, das gleiche macht der SFP Uplink statt dem BaseT (ist ja die gleiche Geschwindigkeit). Bringt einfach ein zusätzliches Level an Sicherheit. Bezüglich
stimme ich die prizipiell zu, allerdings habe ich hier schon sehr viel gesehen, und das auch bei High-End Storage Systemen. Wenn RAID und vorallem Caching im Einsatz ist, ist beim aktiven schreiben eines Backups ein Stromausfall immer heikel.

Antwort 2 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,178 Kommentare 18,761 Likes

Ja und nein. Die USV sehe ich auch als wichtig an, deshalb bastele ich mir hier auch noch was. Mit den bis zu 30 Watt des NAS und dem Gebimmel von FritzBox, Modem und Switch reicht man da schon recht lange. Und es reicht auch für diverse Notrufe :D

Wir hatten schon partielle Stromausfälle, wo weder die Kupferleitungen, noch die Handy-Masten funktionierten, FTTH allerdings schon. dann ist es durchaus praktisch, eine echte Kommunikationsalternative zu haben und die Backups zu Ende schreiben zu lassen. Der Worst Case war mal ein Vorfahrtsunfall, wo ein Auto nach dem Zusammenstoß den Telekom-Verteiler rasiert hat und der Unfallgegener das Trafohäuschen. Kollektive Leistung auf allerhöchtem Level. :D

Antwort 4 Likes

echolot

Urgestein

924 Kommentare 722 Likes

Also ist die Synology NAS dann sehr gut geeignet für den KMU-Bereich (3-5 Mitarbeiter) bei durchschnittlicher Datenauslastung? Irgendwelche Einschränkungen?

Antwort Gefällt mir

N
NilsHG

Mitglied

84 Kommentare 51 Likes

Und damit fliegt das QNAP aus der Wunschliste :)
Vielen Dank für Deinen Hinweis.
Bastel ich jetzt noch weiter mit Truenas Scale oder wirds doch eine Syno? Tja.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung