GPUs Graphics Reviews

Sapphire Radeon RX 6750XT Nitro+ Review – Quiet and thanks to dual BIOS times thirstier or more frugal than an RX 6700XT

The launch of the Radeon RX 6750XT is a week ago and the prices are falling. It’s about time again to test a board partner card with the Sapphire Radeon RX 6750 XT Nitro+ 12 GB, which is either more frugal or thirstier than the older RX 6700XT and can thus be faster or a bit slower. Either, or – by the way, the two generations will never exactly meet in the test, and that’s a good thing. With a current street price of 648 Euros and a slight downward trend, the card hardly leaves room to breathe for Intel’s upcoming “flagship” and we can already see where the journey will probably go with Team Blue’s disk launch. In this regard, I also refer to the section with power consumption and efficiency in this article, because we also want to see where the journey is still going and which bar Intel will obviously have to break soon (if at all). Because when there are no more major changes in the drivers, it gets boring and the 6650XT has to stand at attention in the blue suit.

But back to Sapphire and AMD, because Intel is currently still blue curd in the shop window. With the (Attention! Officially prescribed name according to AMD’s nomenclature) “NITRO+ AMD Radeon™ RX 6750 XT Gaming Graphics Card with 12GB GDDR6, AMD RDNA™ 2”, which I will call Sapphire RX 6750 XT Nitro+ again in the article for the sake of simplicity (as otherwise the charts and legends would explode) here lies a thoroughly interesting RDNA2 specimen that you have to listen twice (or three times) to hear. Speaking of designation and charts, all tested cards are board partner models, to be fair. Where the Nitro+ is not listed as Perf or Silent in the chart labels, the AMD cards are MSI’s factory overclocked Gaming X series board partner cards, and the NVIDIA cards are the SUPRIM X series. Unfortunately, I have to take this step, because otherwise the names, which are as long as a horse, will become almost as long as the much more interesting bars.

This graphics card, like all RX 6000 models, can handle the new AV1 video codec, they also support DirectX 12 Ultimate for the first time and thus DirectX Raytracing (DXR). With AMD FidelityFX, they also offer a feature that should also give developers more leeway when selecting effects. Variable Rate Shading (VRS) is also included, which can save an immense amount of computing power by smartly reducing the display quality of image areas that are not in the player’s eye anyway. So much for the feature set of all new Radeon cards.

 

Optics and haptics

The Sapphire RX 6750 XT Nitro+ weighs 1161 grams and is thus almost a flyweight. Nevertheless, a graphics card holder is included for free. It is thus also considerably lighter than the MSI card from the launch article and with its full 31.5 cm it is also quite long. In addition, there is the usual 12.5 cm installation height from the PEG and a thickness of 5.8 cm, with a backplate and the PCB adding a total of five more millimeters.

The two-tone body (black and gray metallic) is made of ABS, the Sapphire lettering on the top and the Nitro+ light band on the back (backplate) are LED illuminated. In contrast to the front, everything at the rear is nicely finished in light metal instead of plastic, which has a lot of haptic appeal.

The graphic brick including illumination is supplied via two standard 8-pin sockets, so everything is as known and used from the Radeon RX 6700XT Nitro+. We can also see the vertical alignment of the cooling fins and the board reinforcement in the form of a backplate and the separate RAM cooler here in the picture. But more about that in a moment in the teardown.

The slot bezel is closed, carries 1x HDMI 2.1 and three current DP ports. However, the USB Type C port is missing. More about the construction, the cooler and the assembly can be found on the next page in the teardown.

Technology

With the 40 compute units (CU), the card has a total of 2560 shaders and is thus virtually “half” a Radeon RX 6950XT. While the base clock is specified at 2495 MHz, the boost clock is 2600 MHz in the Silent BIOS and 2623 MHz in the Performance BIOS, which is also achieved. Card relies on 12 GB GDDR6 with 18 Gbps, which is made up of 6 modules of 2 GB each. This includes the 192-bit memory interface and the 96 MB Infinity Cache, which should solve the bandwidth problem. The card thus fortunately has a switchable dual BIOS, which is nice. When the BIOS DIP switch is set to the left, a switchover can be solved seamlessly and directly via software on-the-fly with Sapphire’s TriXX software.

 

Other data is different in the BIOS, for example the TGP, i.e. the maximum power for GPU, SoC and memory. The performance version offers up to 230 watts TGP instead of 200. The details show the stored values from the MorePowerTool (left respectively the performance BIOS, right the silent BIOS)

 

 

 

Raytracing / DXR

At the latest since the presentation of the new Radeon cards, it is clear that AMD will also support ray tracing. Here, NVIDIA takes a different path and implements a so-called “ray accelerator” per compute unit (CU). Since the Radeon RX 6800 has a total of 72 CUs, this also results in 72 such accelerators for the Radeon RX 6800XT, while the smaller Radeon RX 6800 still has 60. A GeForce RTX 3080 has 68 RT cores, which is nominally less for now. When comparing the smaller cards, the score is 62 for the RX 6800 and 46 for the GeForce RTX 3070. However, RT cores are organized differently and we will have to wait and see what quantity can do against specialization here. In the end, it is an apples and oranges comparison.

But what has AMD come up with here? Each of these accelerators is first capable of simultaneously calculating up to 4 beam/box intersections or a single beam/triangle intersection per cycle. In this way, the intersection points of the rays with the scene geometry are calculated (analogous to the bounding volume hierarchy), first pre-sorted and then this information is returned to the shaders for further processing within the scene or the final shading result is output. However, NVIDIA’s RT cores seem to be much more complex, as I already explained in detail during the Turing launch. What counts is the result alone, and that’s exactly what we have suitable benchmarks for.

Smart Access Memory (SAM)

AMD already showed SAM, i.e. Smart Access Memory, at the presentation of the new Radeon cards – a feature that I also enabled today in addition to the normal benchmarks, which also makes a direct comparison possible. But actually SAM is not Neuers, just verbally more nicely packaged. This is nothing more than the clever handling of the Base Address Register (BAR), and it is exactly this support that must be activated in the substructure. Resizable PCI bars (see also PCI SIG from 4/24/2008) have played an important role in modern AMD graphics hardware for quite some time, since the actual PCI BARs are normally only limited to 256 MB, while the new Radeon graphics cards now offer up to 16 GB VRAM.

The consequence is that only a fraction of the VRAM is directly accessible for the CPU, which requires a whole series of workarounds in the so-called driver stack without SAM. Of course, this always costs performance and should therefore be avoided. AMD thus starts exactly there with SAM. This is not new, but it has to be implemented cleanly in the UEFI and also activated later. This is only possible when the system is running in UEFI mode and CSM/Legacy is disabled.

CSM stands for the Compatibility Support Module. The Compatibility Support Module exists exclusively under UEFI and it ensures that older hardware and software also works with UEFI. The CSM is always helpful when not all hardware components are compatible with UEFI. Some older operating systems as well as the 32-bit versions of Windows also cannot be installed on UEFI hardware. However, exactly this compatibility setting often prevents the clean Windows variant needed for the new AMD components during installation.

First you have to check in the BIOS of the motherboard if UEFI or CSM/Legacy is active and if not, make sure to do this step. Only then you can activate and use the resizable PCI-BARs at all, but stop – does your Windows boot at all then? How to convert an (older) disk from MBR to GPT, so that it is recognized cleanly under UEFI, you could read among other things also in the forum, if there are questions in this regard, that leads here now too far.
 
The fact is that AMD sets the hurdles for the use of SAM quite high and has only communicated this sparsely so far. A current Zen3 CPU is required, as well as a B550 or X570 motherboard with an updated BIOS. The UEFI is then again a small, but immensely important side note. It should also be noted that NVIDIA and Intel have already announced their own solutions or plan to use them in the future. One goes first, the others follow suit, whereas it could have been done long ago. But they didn’t, for whatever reason. Over 12 years of drawer is plenty of wasted time. But better late than never.
 

Test system and evaluation software

The benchmark system is new and is no longer in the lab, but in the editorial room again. For direct logging during all games and applications, I use NVIDIA’s PCAD and my own development with Powenetics’ software, which increases the comfort immensely. The measurement of power consumption and other things continues to be carried out in the air-conditioned laboratory on a redundant test system that is identical in every detail, but then using high-resolution oscillograph technology..

…and the self-created MCU-based measurement setup for motherboards graphics cards (pictures below), where at the end in the air-conditioned room also the thermographic infrared images are created with a high-resolution industrial camera. The audio measurements are done outside in my Chamber (room within a room).

I have also summarized the individual components of the test system in a table:

 

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

Cerebral_Amoebe

Veteran

118 Kommentare 57 Likes

Danke für den Test!

Ich hatte die Sapphire Nitro RX 6700XT, die Lüfter waren sehr leise, aber das Spulenfiepen war gruselig.
Kommt noch ein Test der MSI RX 6750XT?

Die Karte hatte durch ihr Eigengewicht mein Gigabyte B550 Aorus Pro lahmgelegt.
Erst nachdem ich einen Grafikkartenhalter eingebaut hatte, startete der PC wieder zuverlässig.
Da kann man die Beigabe des Grafikkartenhalters wirklich begrüßen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

S
Staarfury

Veteran

257 Kommentare 206 Likes

Schöner Test. Und mal wieder ein perfektes Beispiel was das Werks-OC bringt: +20% Strom für +6% FPS

P.S. Auf Seite 1 scheinen die MPT Screens auf beiden Seiten identisch zu sein und auf Seite 8 hat Jensen noch eine Geforce reingeschmuggelt.

Antwort Gefällt mir

G
Guest

Interessant. Nun ist für mich klar, dass ich bei meiner 6700XT Nitro wohl die WLP auf jeden Fall wechseln sollte.
Meine Karte steht aufrecht in meinem Eigenbaugehäuse, mag da noch mit reinspielen. Aber von Anfang an lief der Lüfter eher höher, mittelweile sehr hoch. Und das bei nur 176 W PPT im silent Bios + undervolted + under... watted auf besagte 176W.
Die Hotspottemperatur geht fast augenblicklich nach Lastbeginn - bspw. 3DMark - auf 82-85° und zieht dann innerhalb von 3-4 Minuten auf 92°, wo sie dann verbleibt. Die Edge Temperatur geht eher langsam hoch, 50, 60, 66°, was völlig ok wäre.
Das klingt jetzt erst mal nach nicht viel Unterschied, außer eben der zeitliche Verlauf. Und die Drehzahl. Die ist bei mir nämlich unter Last eher bei 1800-1900 U/min und das ist nicht mehr leise. Das Anlaufverhalten ist eben auch ganz anders als in Igors Diagrammen, denn es läuft zwar relativ laut an, ja. Aber dann wird es eben noch lauter ;). Sie lief unter Last auch nie wirklich unter 1600 U/min, ist jetzt glaube ich aber schon schlechter geworden.
Mein Vorteil ist, dass ich aktuell eh kaum damit zocke. Aber wenn es wirklich mit nur 800 oder 1000 U/min laufen könnte, das wäre ja toll. Und ja sie ist exzellent von Außenluft auf 1-2 cm Abstand mit 2x120er Gehäuselüftern zwangsbelüftet.

Hm hatte es bisher immer vor mir hergeschoben. Aber ich schätze es wird Zeit sich mal entsprechend passende WLP zu kaufen. Muss zugeben, dass ich doch bisschen faul bin gerade. Idle schafft sie ja auch so, aber der Unterschied scheint ja irre zu sein zu meiner Karte.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
DaBo87

Mitglied

76 Kommentare 49 Likes

Danke für den Test! Für mich persönlich wird die Karte nichts, habe die 6700XT Red Devil. Aber mein Nachbar wechselt von der Betonpumpe in den Innendienst und bekommt Homeofficezugang - der fragte schon nach einem PC, mit dem er auch zocken kann. Die Karte werde ich im Hinterkopf behalten.

Das vorletzte Bild auf der Fazitseite ist übrigens falsch - da wird die KFA Geforce aus dem Test davor gezeigt :)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,184 Kommentare 18,774 Likes

Dann schau mal genauer hin ;)

Seite 8 ist gefixt, Danke. keine Ahnung, wo die schon wieder herkam.

Antwort 2 Likes

S
Staarfury

Veteran

257 Kommentare 206 Likes

Habs jetzt auch gesehen.
Ich korrigiere meine Aussage auf die BIOSse scheinen fast identisch zu sein ;)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Cerebral_Amoebe

Veteran

118 Kommentare 57 Likes

@Igor
Beim Absatz Raytracing ist ein Fehler bei den CU-Zuweisungen der Karten.
6800 und 6800XT 72CU, die kleinere 6800 60CU.
Hat die 6700XT/6750XT 60CU?

Antwort Gefällt mir

F
Furda

Urgestein

663 Kommentare 370 Likes

Vielleicht etwas off topic, sorry, aber immer wieder interessant, dass AMD GPUs 800-1000MHz höher takten als vergleichbare von Nvidia. Erheblich unterschiedliche Konzepte.

Antwort Gefällt mir

c
cunhell

Urgestein

549 Kommentare 503 Likes

Irgendwie verstehe ich Sapphire nicht. Warum müssen die Lüfter bei Start auf 1.400rpm hochgejagt werden. Das hatte ich bei meiner Vega 56 Pulse auch. Nervte nur noch. Zuerst wurden die Lüfter hochgejagt und wenn das Spiel nicht fordernd genug war sofort wieder abgestellt. Das Spiel wiederholte sich ständig. Wenn man die Karte auslastete, lief sie dann ruhig bei 1.200rpm vor sich hin. Aber nicht jedes Spiel und vor allem ältere konnten die Karte nicht dauerhaft genug heizen. Das war echt nervig.
Meine AMD RX6700XT startet die Lüfter mit 600rpm und dreht bei bedarf auf. Gut, seit ein paar Wochen schnart der Lüfter bei Anlaufen als ob ein DVD-Laufweerk eine Medium sucht und läuft danach ruhig vor sich hin, aber diese Steuerung an sich finde ich sehr viel vernünftiger.
Anm.: Hatte zu dem Geräusch ja im Forum nachgefragt, ob das andere auch kennen.

Cunhell

Antwort Gefällt mir

v
vonXanten

Urgestein

803 Kommentare 335 Likes

Danke für den Test. Eine interessante Karte, evtl. kommt die in die Auswahl für ein Update bei den Kids, da werkelt noch eine RX580 und kommt teils an ihr Limit.
Und da dieses Exemplar leise ist und recht gute Temperaturen hat warum nicht.
@cunhell eigentlich wird soetwas gemacht damit die Lüfter sicher anlaufen. Aber hab dieses Verhalten noch nicht mitbekommen bei meiner 5700XT und 6900XT, beides Nitros. Weiß allerdings nicht ob es da nochmals Unterschiede bei den SE Versionen gibt.
Bei deinem Lüftergeräusch könnte es sich um einen Lagerschaden handeln. Schonmal mit Hand bewegt die Lüfter, evtl. dreht sich einer davon nicht so gut wie die anderen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

G
Guest

Sapphire und neuere Generation hat eigentlich immer was. Danke für den Test.

Aber 650 Steine ist halt irgendwie immer noch sehr viel Kohle, da weiß ich echt nicht, ob mir das den Leistungssprung von einer RTX 2060 wert ist.
Besser ist die sicher. Aber gut, dann muss die R290x halt noch etwas werkeln. Ist ja nur für Retro. Aber trotzdem würde ich mein kleines Sammlerstück von Sapphire gerne funktionierend in Rente schicken.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Annatasta(tur)

Veteran

354 Kommentare 128 Likes

Das Hochdrehen der Lüfter diehnt (ganz bestimmt) der Selbstreinigung! :ROFLMAO: Erstmal den angesetzten Staub vom Kühler blasen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Epistolarius

Mitglied

33 Kommentare 5 Likes

Das liest sich irgendwie merkwürdig. Was soll daran schlecht sein, auch die Hotspot- statt nur Edge/Junction-Temperatur bei AMD GPUs auslesen zu können? Oder anhand der Hotspot-Temperatur den Takt oder Lüfterkurven zu regeln? Und ich dachte das wäre gleich gelöst wie bei RDNA, was wurde da genau verbessert?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Bariphone

Veteran

102 Kommentare 52 Likes

Schau dir auf jeden Fall die Paste mal an. Ich hatte da bei einer 5700XT mal solch Erlebnis. Wobei ich sagen muss, dass ich sowas von Sapphire absolut nicht gewöhnt war. Da schoss die Hotspot sofort auf um die 95°C hoch.

Hier mal der Werkszustand. AHb ich in letzter zeit leider öfters erlebt, dass es so etwas bei Sapphire gibt

View image at the forums

View image at the forums

Antwort 3 Likes

daknoll

Mitglied

16 Kommentare 2 Likes

Das kann ich auch für meine Sapphire RX6800 bestätigen.
Anfang Jänner 2021 gekauft, ca. 2 Monate lief sie ganz normal, bis dann von einem Tag auf den anderen die Hotspot Temperatur unter Last sofort auf ca. 95 Grad stieg, die Lüfter hochdehten und dort blieben. Mit Lastende haben sie dann dafür auch sofort wieder runtergeregelt.
Wollte sie zuerst schon reklamieren, habe dann aber mit ungutem Gefühl, vor allem wegen evtl. Garantieverlust bei einer 930.- Karte, die Wärmeleitpaste ausgetauscht.
Seither läuft sie wieder leise wie am ersten Tag mit normalem Temperaturverhalten.
So etwas kannte ich von meinen Sapphire Karten bisher nicht und ich vewende seit mehr als 15 Jahren eigentlich nur Sapphire.

Antwort 1 Like

Homerclon

Mitglied

76 Kommentare 35 Likes

Die von MSI wurde doch schon getestet, dient in diesem Test der Sapphire auch als Vergleich.
Der Artikel zur 6950, 6750 und 6650 wurde mithilfe der Exemplare von MSI durchgeführt.
Um genau zu sein, handelt es sich im Falle der 6750 um eine MSI RX 6750 XT Gaming X Trio.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,184 Kommentare 18,774 Likes

Das Thema mit der Wärmeleitpaste hatte ich mit Sapphire schon durchgekaut, auf der 6750XT war schon was Besseres. :)

Antwort 3 Likes

Bariphone

Veteran

102 Kommentare 52 Likes

Was würden wir nur ohne Dich machen. ;)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Cerebral_Amoebe

Veteran

118 Kommentare 57 Likes

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung