CPU Motherboard Reviews Workstations

Raptor Lake Resfresh with the Intel Core i9-14900K, Core i7-14700K and Core i5-14600K Review – Hot dragon battle in the energetic final stage

Much helps much, my grandma used to say. And before you throw something away, it’s better to make something new out of it. So say my grandma and Intel. After Raptor Lake is before Arrow Lake, and so the Raptor refresh comes almost exactly one year later. Says Intel and my grandma is silent. And so, in addition to a bit more clock, at least for one CPU, there are also a few more e-cores on the data sheet. But nothing in life is for free. So say my grandma and my energy provider. And that’s exactly what will be the topic today: How much more do you have to put in at the EPS port so that something still happens at the HDMI or DisplayPort port? And above all: How is the whole thing in proportion?

You can already see from the intro picture that I’ll also show the so-called Influenzer box from Intel this time, which was kindly provided to me directly by the manufacturer. It contains an Intel Core i9-14900K and a Core i5-14600K, which were also used for the tests. Beyond that, I also got myself a Core i7-14700K via my usual channels, which is the exact CPU that Intel always likes to hide during launches. And I also borrowed a second Core i9-14900K from an SI for plausibility reasons, to be able to exclude a possible press binning. And I’ll write this right away: the press sample was even slightly worse, so it’s not a golden sample.

Important change in the PL1 and PL2 and the trick with ICCMax

Power comes from fuel and so Intel has now specified: The processor base performance is equal to the maximum Turbo performance! Intel has thus seriously changed the standard values for the power control of the “K” processors. Although this change enables a permanent operation at maximum Turbo performance, in contrast to the limited times in earlier products, it sticks to the socket even more. Unfortunately, this adjustment also reflects the common practice of motherboard manufacturers who develop platforms with power supply features that meet or exceed this specification. This way, you shine in benchmarks and the customer is happy (but the energy provider even more so).

Higher clock speeds improve performance, but can increase power and current consumption beyond normal specified limits in heavily threaded workloads. Under appropriate conditions, Intel has determined that the new processors can safely operate at these increased limits. To enable this, an optional Extreme Power Delivery profile was introduced by Intel after the launch of the first 13th generation Core processors.

This profile enables better multi-core performance when sufficient thermal reserves are available and the motherboard is able to provide the additional power and performance required. The Extreme Power Delivery profile has also been applied to the 14th generation Intel Core processors. Although the PL1/PL2 and ICCMax values are higher than previously stated in the specification, they are now within the processor’s specifications thanks to the addition of the Extreme Power Delivery profile. Users can adjust these higher performance and current levels via the BIOS setup.

The following table compares the Power and Extreme Power Delivery profiles as an example and provides values that can be used to configure BIOS settings to enable the different Power Delivery profiles (which can also be done manually):

While PL1 and PL2 are known as common BIOS parameters used to configure power delivery options, ICCMax should not be overlooked as it can also have significant impact on CPU performance. ICCMax determines the maximum current that the processor is allowed to draw. Different manufacturers use different names for ICCMax in their BIOS settings or overclocking tools. This value is measured in amps (A). To make sure that you change the correct BIOS parameter for this setting, it is recommended to ask the manufacturer of the motherboard.

Unfortunately, there are also always manufacturers that offer “standard” BIOS settings for the respective motherboard, which increase the power and current values beyond the specifications set by Intel. However, these values do not necessarily guarantee maximum performance! Using the values from the Extreme Power Delivery profile, on the other hand, allows for an increase in performance while the CPU continues to operate within the specified operating limits.

The new CPUs: Raptor Lake Refresh at a glance

The Intel Core i9 14900K will have 24 CPU cores (8 P and 16 E) and thus offer 32 CPU threads. The CPU has 36 MB of L3 smart cache and 32 MB of L2 cache, as well as a P-Core Max Turbo of 6.0 GHz. It also features the integrated Intel UHD Graphics 770 and offers a total of 20 PCIe lanes. Both DDR5 5600 and DDR4 3200 MHz memory are supported with a maximum memory capacity of 128 GB. The base TDP (PL1) and PL2 are set to 253W by default. there is also a KF variant that is otherwise identical but lacks integrated graphics.

One step lower comes the Core i7-14700K, which offers 16 cores (8 P and 12 E) and thus a total of 28 threads and thus 4 E-cores more than the i7-13700K. This CPU, which is probably more interesting for normal users, also has 30 MB L3 Smart Cache and 24 MB L2 Cache as well as a P-Core Max Turbo of 5.6 GHz. The CPU also has the integrated Intel UHD Graphics 770 and also offers a total of 20 PCIe lanes. Both DDR5 5600 and DDR4 3200 MHz memory are supported with a maximum memory capacity of 128 GB. PL1 and PL2 are supposed to be set to 253W by default, however, my motherboard had a value of 288 watts nominally stored.

Manually setting PL1 and PL2 to “only” 253 watts and reducing ICCMax resulted in performance losses and even instabilities during full-load operation, which only ran when the clock was lowered significantly. I suspect that they simply pushed up salvage dies here. Unpleasant, but it ran then also. However, this would also be a plausible explanation for the fact that the efficiency of my Core i7-14700K was significantly worse than that of the I9-14900K.

Finally, there is the Core i5 14600K, which has 14 cores (6 P and 8 E) and a total of 20 threads. This CPU has 24 MB of L3 Smart Cache and 20 MB of L2 cache and offers a P-Core Max Turbo of 5.3 GHz. The CPU also features Intel UHD Graphics 770 and offers 20 PCIe lanes as well. Both DDR5 5600 and DDR4 3200 MHz memory are supported with a maximum memory capacity of 128 GB. The base TDP (PL1) is now set to 181 watts, while PL2 also defaults to 181W.

Before I go into more detail about the heatspreader on the next page, I want to finish the introduction with a table that lists all SKUs again and compares them over 3 generations:

  Core-i-12000
(Alder Lake)
Core-i-13000
(Raptor Lake)
Core-i-14000*
(Raptor Lake Refresh)
Core i9-xx900KS 16C/24T (8P 8E) 5.5 GHz 24C/32T (8P 16E) 6.0 GHz
Core i9-xx900K 16C/24T (8P 8E) 5.2 GHz 24C/32T (8P 16E) 5.8 GHz 24C/32T (8P 16E) 6.0 GHz
Core i9-xx900 16C/24T (8P 8E) 5.1 GHz 24C/32T (8P 16E) 5.6 GHz 24C/32T (8P 16E) 5.8 GHz
Core i7-xx700K 12C/20T (8P 4E) 5.0 GHz 16C/24T (8P 8E) 5.4 GHz 20C/28T (8P 12E) 5.6 GHz
Core i7-xx700 12C/20T (8P 4E) 4.8 GHz 16C/24T (8P 8E) 5.2 GHz 20C/28T (8P 12E) 5.4 GHz
Core i5-xx600K 10C/16T (6P 4E) 4.9 GHz 14C/20T (6P 8E) 5.1 GHz 14C/20T (6P 8E) 5.3 GHz
Core i5-xx600 6C/12T (6P 0E) 4.8 GHz 14C/20T (6P 8E) 5.0 GHz 14C/20T (6P 8E) 5.2 GHz
Core i5-xx500 6C/12T (6P 0E) 4.6 GHz 14C/20T (6P 8E) 4.8 GHz 14C/20T (6P 8E) 5.0 GHz
Core i5-xx400 6C/12T (6P 0E) 4.4 GHz 10C/16T (6P 4E) 4.6 GHz 10C/16T (6P 4E) 4.7 GHz
Core i3-xx300 4C/8T (4P 0E) 4.4 GHz
Core i3-xx100 4C/8T (4P 0E) 4.1 GHz 4C/8T (4P 0E) 4.5 GHz 4C/8T (4P 0E) 4.7 GHz

You can read the review of the 13th generation including all the basics and theoretical basics about Raptor Lake in last year’s review:

Intel Core i9-13900K and Core i5-13600K Review – Showdown of the 13th Generation and a 3/4 Crown for the last big Monolith

255 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

L
LordRayden

Neuling

3 Kommentare 1 Likes

Hallo Igor,

habe da mal eine Frage, weil das Problem was du mit dem 14700K hast, mich mit dem 13700KF trifft.
Wenn ich meinen 13700KF passend zu meiner Luftkühlung auf 125 Watt PL1/PL2 begrenze, dann schmieren mir aufwendige Games wie BF2042 und Red Dead Redemption 2 ab.
Nachdem mich das viele Nerven gekostet hat und auch leichte Spannungserhöhungen nichts gebracht haben, kam ich irgendwann drauf die CPU auf 5 GHZ zu begrenzen, seitdem kann ich ewig Zocken ohne das es Instabilitäten geben würde.
Das ist doch ein Garantiefall oder? Die CPU müsste doch mit Powerlimit stabil laufen, schließlich schreibt ja Intel ganz offiziell man soll die Powerlimits an die Kühllösung anpassen.

Ansonsten danke für den Test.👍

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,301 Kommentare 19,090 Likes

Tja.... Ich würde es mal versuchen.

Antwort 1 Like

L
LordRayden

Neuling

3 Kommentare 1 Likes

Hast du Intel mit dem Problem von deinem 14700K konfrontiert? Für mich ist das ein Unding, kann ja nicht sein das die Dinger abschmieren wenn sie nicht "frei saufen" dürfen.

Antwort 1 Like

Case39

Urgestein

2,519 Kommentare 942 Likes

Der Test hat sich richtig gelohnt. Die Plüsch Dinos sind richtig süß...die CPUs? War da was?

Antwort 4 Likes

konkretor

Veteran

306 Kommentare 313 Likes

Die Dinosaurier die immer mal wieder im Testbericht auftauchen, waren das Beste daran.

Die Arbeit hätte sich Intel sparen können. Irgendwie hält man immer noch an der tik/tok Strategie fest obwohl es seit Jahren nicht mehr aufgeht.

Antwort 2 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,301 Kommentare 19,090 Likes

Da ich im Gegesatz zu manchen Redaktionen offiziell keinen haben durfte, das Problem aber nicht neu ist (siehe mein RPL-Test aus 2022 und der erste Post hier), wüsste ich keinen Grund, dort anzufragen. Es ist ein Retail-Exemplar, was bereits auf dem Weg zurück ist mangels zugesicherter Eigenschaften. Und MSI kennt die Problematik ja, siehe Power im UEFI :D

Antwort 2 Likes

G
Guest

Danke für den Tests mit Powerlimit. Oft werden die Dinger ja einfach nur offen gebencht. Völliger Irrsinn. Obwohl man zugeben muss, dass sie in der freien Wildbahn durch bekloppte Defaultsettings der Mainboardhersteller wohl oft so laufen werden.

Ich sehe schon wieder 1000 Threads in Form von "14xxx wird zu heiß".
Aber immerhin: die Verbiegerei scheint mit dem 14er vorerst nicht mehr so schlimm zu sein, bleibt abzuwarten. Erbärmlich, was das 14700K Exemplar abgeliefert hat. Am Ende bleibt es dabei, was man vorher auch schon ahnen konnte: 13600/14600K sind die einzigen Dinger, die vielleicht im Ansatz sinnig sind. Der Rest ist schon ganz schön over the top. Früher haben Extremtakter ihre CPUs so misshandelt. Was ja okay ist - eigene Schuld. In Kombi mit den offenen Settings im UEFI vieler Boards finde ich das einfach nur noch gestört, was auf die Anwender losgelassen wird.

Den ganzen Refresh-Dingsbumms hätte niemand gebraucht. Ich bin froh, dass ich nicht mehr so "sinnlos" benchen muss, wie du Igor dieses mal. Ich weiß noch damals bei meinem Review 2004 (?), was ich zu Prescott P4 S478 vs Northwood verfassen "musste". Da hat echt wenig Spaß gemacht. Es war einfach so sinnlos. Zeiten wiederholen sich wohl.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Igor Wallossek

1

10,301 Kommentare 19,090 Likes

Ja, der Presskopf war auch so eine energetische Heißluftpumpe 🤦🤣

Antwort 5 Likes

Lagavulin

Veteran

233 Kommentare 189 Likes

Vielen Dank für den Test.

Drei Erkenntnisse für mich:
1. Die Kühlung ist nicht das Problem (da lag ich mit meiner Vermutung falsch)
2. Intel tanzt den Sidestep
3. Gegen Influenza hilft die Grippeschutzimpfung, gegen Influencer hilft Lesen auf Igor’sLab

Zum Glück ist es noch einige Zeit hin bis zu meinem nächsten Build und ich warte mal ab, was Arrow Lake bringt. Leistung steigern allein reicht mir nicht, die Effizienz muss besser werden.

Antwort 3 Likes

Gregor Kacknoob

Urgestein

529 Kommentare 443 Likes

Plüsch? Plüüüüsch! Und leider keine überzeugende Konkurrenz zum 7800X3D. Den Test werde ich mir später noch mal detailierter reinziehen :)

Antwort Gefällt mir

W
Wellenbrecher

Mitglied

48 Kommentare 41 Likes

Vielen Dank für den ausführlichen Test, auch wenn die neuen Intel CPUs eher sinnlos ist. Interressant scheint nur der 14600K zu sein. Das wahre Highlight sind heute die Dinos.

Ich weiß nicht, wie es andere Nutzer sehen, aber ich finde aktuell den CPU-Markt irgendwie uninteressant, obwohl einige gute CPUs zur Verfügung stehen. Die Ryzen 7000 sind eher teuer, man braucht neues MB und neuen Ram. Die Intel-CPUs finde ich wiederum weitgehend langweilig, auch wegen der schlechten Effizienz.

Ich hatte mir immer wieder überlegt aufzurüsten, aber wozu? Vor zwei Jahren habe ich den Ryzen 5 1600X mit einem 3800X ersetzt (er war günstiger als der 3700X), den ich im eco-mode betreibe. Alles was ich in WQHD spiele, läuft gut. Damals war es noch nicht bekannt, dass B350 und X370 Mainboards auch die Ryzen 5000 unterstützen werden. Irgendwie habe ich auch keine Lust nochmals 300€ auszugeben, um den Ryzen 7 5800X3D zu kaufen. Alle andere CPUs der 5000 Serie machen für mich zumindest als Upgrade keinen Sinn.

Von daher warte ich auf Arrow Lake oder bis sich die Preise bei den Ryzen 7000 noch besser werden (was aber auch Wunschdenken bleiben kann).

Antwort 1 Like

Sephiroth Nikon

Mitglied

58 Kommentare 7 Likes

Schade, dann werden die Preise für AM5 / Ryzen 7 und 9 erst einmal stabil bleiben.
Dann hoffe ich auf den black friday. :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

Tronado

Urgestein

3,815 Kommentare 2,000 Likes

Tja. :)

Das war dann wohl wirklich nix, ich hatte mir zumindest eine geringe Gaming- und MC-Performancesteigerung gewünscht. Um den Bastel- und Benchmarktrieb noch vor Weihnachten befriedigen zu können. Aber wie man sieht, bringt er im Vergleich zu meinem prima eingestellten 13900KF...gar nichts. Schade, wenigstens ein wenig mehr Cache hätte man allen CPUs draufpacken können, aber das war schon zu viel verlangt.

Antwort Gefällt mir

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,558 Kommentare 885 Likes

Ich hatte so einen; ersetzte den Heizlüfter am Schreibtisch.

Antwort 2 Likes

Selaya

Mitglied

21 Kommentare 9 Likes

der retail-erworbene 14700k schmiert beim PL test ab?
riecht ja schonwieder nach golden samples

Antwort Gefällt mir

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,558 Kommentare 885 Likes

Scheinbar ist die eigentliche Verbesserung zur 13ten Generation ein flacherer Heatspreader; leider. Der Thread Direktor ist wohl auch nicht wirklich verbessert worden, wobei ich da allerdings nicht weiß, wieviel da auch in Nachhinein was bei der Firmware ginge.

Intel hätte wenigstens die Preise (UVP) etwas senken und ein attraktives Bündel mit gutem Rabatt auf CPU + Board schnüren können, damit wäre gerade der i5 uU noch interessant gewesen. Für alles andere heißt es, entweder AMD oder auf Arrow Lake warten.

Antwort Gefällt mir

grimm

Urgestein

3,113 Kommentare 2,048 Likes

Oder mal ne Runde aussetzen, weil angesichts dieser "Neuentwicklung" kein Handlungsbedarf besteht.

Antwort 3 Likes

F
Furda

Urgestein

663 Kommentare 371 Likes

Hmm. Der i14700 mit +4 E Cores im Vergleich zum direkten Vorgänger hätte ein richtig gutes letztes Upgrade für 1700er Sockel werden können...
Aber was liefert Intel da ab?! Säuft mehr als der grössere i14900 und schmiert ab wenn man den Hahn ein Bisschen zu dreht? Grosse Enttäuschung. Epic fail.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Alexander Brose

Moderator

825 Kommentare 579 Likes

Du könntest auf einen 7800X3D upgraden...

Grüße!

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung