Editor's Desk Editor's Desk GPUs Graphics Latest news

EVGA pulls the plug with a loud bang, but it has been stewing for a long time | Editorial

If you want to (or have to) separate, then there are two ways to announce this: one emotionless and one where you once again seek the big stage. EVGA chose, what a coincidence, the time shortly before NVIDIA’s in-house exhibition GTC (after that, the whole thing would have gone down a bit) to drop the bombshell that wasn’t really a bombshell anymore. This media uprising and aftermath is really just the long overdue flashback after a smoldering fire that lasted for months and in which the green fuse was even shorter than Jensen’s wood screws in his old Fermi mock up.

I thought long and hard about whether to write something about it (and about what), because I also have my own private opinion about the circumstances in general and EVGA’s appearance in particular, which has been formed in the last few years also due to my own experiences. That’s why I also used the weekend to chat or talk on the phone with one or the other competitor and colleague, in addition to all the benchmarks. Because the way in which and where the reason is now located and the way in which a suitable culprit is presented at the same time has caused quite a stir among many people. It’s not about defending NVIDIA, but using Jensen as the ideal object of hatred is a bit short-sighted and only distracts from one’s own failures. But you have to throw something down the throat of the investors and brand-affine customers. And that’s where the green leather jacket Hulk is best suited.

My colleague Stephen Burke from Gamersnexus has actually already said most of it, I don’t need to dissect and regurgitate that again. I’ll just post the short quote from EVGA CEO Andrew Han again now before I get my own thoughts on it.

We are not going to be on Jensen’s lap on stage, so I don’t want people to speculate what’s going on….EVGA has decided to nat carry the next gen. (Andrew Han, CEO)

 

The business model: Let others do it

In principle, EVGA is nothing more than a brand without its own production. Of course, the company has its own R&D department for the engineering, but the level of creativity is not particularly high here either, if you only have to rely on the abilities of third parties in the end, be it the circuit boards, the coolers and the complete production as the final implementation. Unfortunately, having it done instead of doing it yourself costs money. And while this very concept mitigates risk and effort in manufacturing, it also reduces the margin that can still be achieved with such a highly complex product. Therefore, I asked several competitors and found out that the currently achievable margins in the worst case (like EVGA) are still 5%, and up to 10% for the do-it-yourself manufacturers, who can manage an own production.

This is not less than in 2021 or 2020, only this year merchandise sales have dropped significantly due to orders staying away and a change in demand. However, that one produces at a loss because of NVIDIA’s money-grubbing claws, as EVGA colports, is considered by many to be an urban legend. These are rather homemade problems with faulty designs and a RMA rate that was beyond good and evil. I don’t want to quote myself again, but the disaster with Amazon’s New World and the scorched circuit boards was expensive, really expensive. To attach this to every card as a loss is definitely too short-sighted.

Let’s say they made 10x profit than normal business last year, if you are the boss, will you quit now or waste another 10 years just to make the same profit amount last year? (Competitor)

 

The business of brands is actually like the good old stock market business, because you should sell at the peak and best take what is still to be taken. If you have to buy almost all services at a high price, there is not much left in the graphics card business. A large manufacturer (not EVGA) easily produces around 200,000 graphics cards per week, which puts the 5 to 10 percent in a different light. In the system gastronomy, business also only works via sheer mass, which is no different with graphics cards. However, EVGA lacks exactly this mass (which can also be seen as a buffer), which can cushion smaller outliers.

 

If you ask the competitors why they haven’t copied EVGA’s warranty, upgrade and exchange model as well, you actually only see grinning faces or shaking heads. Statements such as “economic suicide by default” are still the most polite thing to say. I wrote that the cards have become more and more complex and that the risk of failure has increased dramatically as a result. Therefore, the RMA processes do not become more favorable, on the contrary. Goodwill and generosity, as EVGA has made its trademark, must also be afforded and what was manageable 10 years ago can end in collapse any day today. House of cards and all. Here, EVGA simply lacks the critical mass to easily pull off something like this financially. Being the US market leader is all well and good, but how big is the DIY market there?

If it were profitable, we would have done it long ago (Competitor)

 

Peripherals and power supplies are much easier to keep track of and now offer much higher margins of up to 30 percent. Power supplies are just the new thermal paste and the run is still properly fueled by ATX 3.0. Speaking of power supplies, I remember how EVGA at the time (this was back in the Kepler days) made the sampling of graphics cards dependent on a positive review of the newly introduced power supplies. Back then, I was still writing for Tom’s Hardware and very stubbornly resisted the “reward for award” system. At that time, however, the “Just buy it!” philosophy did not yet exist there and one was still allowed to do such things as a reviewer.

As a result, I was then excluded from sampling for a few years. By the way, I’m still alive, which shows once again that you don’t have to go along with something like that if you don’t want to. I also don’t want to repeat how EVGA products later failed my tests and the engineering used my findings (pad mod, area increase on the cooling frame, RAM monitoring in the ICX design), but the PR kicked nasty in my direction. I never asked for money for my support, but would probably have been happy to receive a thank you now and then. By the way, this is exactly where you notice the difference between a US company like EVGA and a German medium-sized company. EVGA is extremely profit-oriented, and when things don’t go so well, they just part with a division. By the way, this is not reprehensible, but the explanations should then also be more honest.

Nvidia's Rules and AMD's Protectionism – Clever Quality Management, Profit Maximization and Niche Manufacturers – Behind-the-scenes Insights

The Green Light Program as a buzzkill

And what does NVIDIA have to do with it now? Yes, even the competitors are properly pissed off that they still don’t know NVIDIA’s prices and don’t know at which dumping or scalper rate Master Jensen will beat his new Ada into the market as a playmate (depending). That’s why you won’t see so many completely new designs, and what I had already called “Playground” in the GeForce RTX 3090 Ti will mostly be continued. This is then economic prudence and not even stupid. EVGA could have thought of that as well.

However, you also have to know that NVIDIA strives for total control and also mercilessly enforces these policies. There isn’t much room left for technical gimmicks á la EVGA’s special models and both sides have clashed hard not only once. EVGA always explores how far you can go and NVIDIA then intervenes to correct the situation. I have already explained this in detail in the article linked above and I don’t want to repeat myself. However, it is also a fact that NVIDIA only provides replacements if you follow “NVIDIA’s rules”. You can approve of this or not, but it leads (at least in theory) to more durable products.

Things like EVGA’s Kingpin models break those rules, but that’s where they’ve found a clever loophole because it’s effectively declared a mod. Galax does the same with the HoF series. Various overclockers give their face for it (for good money) and it is not a consumer product. That’s why you don’t get a real HoF including unlimited OC tool as a normal customer, but only the “roadworthy” version under the same name. The rest is then expensive cannon fodder for the LN2 artillery. Such marketing escapades also cost money, of course, even if they can boost the company’s image. The good Kingpin must now look for another place in the money rainforest, but the choice is rather manageable there.

I didn’t really want to go that far, but once you’re in such a nice writing flow, the shore you’re aiming for gets further and further away. In order to come to some kind of conclusion at the end, I’ll make it simple for myself, because I can perhaps also question some things differently: It is certainly not a loss for me (and many others), because it became apparent that the model practiced for years would no longer have been financially viable in this way. And before one admits this publicly and meekly, one looks for the last big performance and says goodbye to the shocked audience with a big bang. I only hope that all previous customers will still be dealt with gallantly and treated fairly. Then it will surely work out with the power supplies, housings and other stuff.

After all, I haven’t heard from any other small Jensen exclusive customers that they now have to throw in the towel for the reasons I mentioned. But they can probably calculate better and also produce themselves. It is a pity about a colorful facet on the graphics card market, which I will also miss, but the customer will get over it.

 

188 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

Cage

Mitglied

18 Kommentare 1 Likes

Super Artikel. Danke. Dann heisst es jetzt umschauen, was als nächstes in die Kiste kommen. Meine 2080Ti die ich gebraucht erworben habe kommt ausnahmsweise von Gigabyte und nicht von EVGA. Bin gespannt was es wird...

Antwort Gefällt mir

HerrRossi

Urgestein

6,468 Kommentare 2,010 Likes

"...aber der Kunde wird es verschmerzen."

Mag sein, aber der Kunde wird sich auch vermehrt mit weniger kulanten Grafikkartenherstellern ärgern müssen.

Bei welchen Herstellern ist eigentlich der Umbau auf Wasser eigentlich noch ohne Garantieverlust möglich? Wie ich neulich gelesen habe, geht das jetzt auch bei Gigabyte nicht mehr.

Antwort 3 Likes

FritzHunter01

Moderator

507 Kommentare 485 Likes

Das Thema hat ja die ganze Tech-Media-Welt über das Wochenende mehr als beschäftigt. Soviel Popcorn hatte ich gar nicht im Haus, um mir diese Dauerbefilmung "Das Grüne Imperium Teil 1-5", "Jenson der Erpresser", "Die Saga vom bösen NVIDIA" und "Es war einmal EVGA" reinzuziehen.

Es hat sich fast ausschließlich, um die ach so bösen Machenschaften von NVIDIA gedreht. Und wenn nur noch einseitig berichtet wird, dann sollte man hellhörig werden. Denn am Ende gibt es bei einer Trennung im zwei Parteien. Somit auch two sides of a story!

Ich war schon etwas verwundert, dass sich Igor bisweil nicht an den News beteiligt hat. Wollte ihn aber am Wochenende auch nicht mit dem offensichtlich aufgepushtem Thema zusätzlich belasten. Schließlich steht Ryzen 7000 an und ich selbst hänge an meinem Lieblings-Monitor, der diese Woche als Review kommt.

Gut, jetzt hat sich Igor doch noch geäußert und bestätigt das, was offensichtlich war. EVGA sagt: Es sind alle anderen Schuld - nur ich nicht... Das kenn ich von Kinder auf dem Spielplatz... Ein player weniger, bedeutet am Ende: Es gibt jetzt die Möglichkeit für die anderen "NVIDIA-geknechteten" mehr Marktvolumen abzugreifen. Bleibt nur die Frage: Ist das jetzt Fluch oder Segen?

Antwort 14 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
n
netterman

Veteran

106 Kommentare 41 Likes

ich habe mir gleich gedacht, das die alleinige Schuld einfach Nvidia umzuhänge doch sehr kurz gedacht ist und es wie immer halt 2 Seiten einer Medailie gibt.

und weil Igor schreibt man wird sie nicht vermissen, also trotz aller scheinbarer Misswirtschaft bei Evga ich werde sie trotzdem vermissen, den gerade aus Kundensicht schon sehr schade und befremdlich, da hier der Verkäufer mit den besten Garantiebestimmungen wegfällt, und wer jemals mit dem Support einer der großen (asus,msi,gigabyte) im Bereich GPU zu tun gehabt hat, wird wohl wissen was ich meine. und was für eine Qual und Odysse im wahrsten Sinne des Wortes das mitunter sein kann.

und die Garantiebestimmungen werden ja leider immer schlechter, manche wie Sapphire bieten ja überhaupt keine Garantie für Endkunden, sondern nur über Distris und da mit unterschiedliche langen Zeiträumen, die man als Kunde erstmal mühsam in Erfahrung bringen muß, soferne man das überhaupt am Schirm hat und nicht erst das böse Erwachen kommt wenn der Schadensfall eintritt und man dann rein auf die Kulanz des Herstellers angewiesen ist (wenn ich da dann die immer höheren Preise der Grafikkarten dagegenhalte ist das dann nicht unbedingt eine erfreuliche Situation... )

Antwort 2 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Igor Wallossek

Format©

7,204 Kommentare 11,831 Likes

Was nützt dir eine Garantie, wenn sie für den Anbieter am Ende ruinös ist? Nix... :(

Antwort 10 Likes

weedeater

Veteran

187 Kommentare 140 Likes

Interessanter Einblick, danke dafür.
Wundern sollte man sich über dieses "Geschäftsgebahren" aber auch nicht. Welcher Hersteller (oder deren Bosse) ist heute noch bereit, eigene Fehler einzugestehen?
Und wie es @FritzHunter01 schon schrieb: bei so mancher "Erklärung" dieser Herren (und Damen) erinnert mich das eher an Kindergebahren auf dem Spielplatz.
Naja, vielleicht entwickelt man sich ja mit zu viel Geld auf dem Konto irgendwie "zurück zu den Anfängen". Und wenn dann nicht mehr so viel reinkommt, hat man eben gelitten. Wie bei EVGA zu sehen.....

Antwort Gefällt mir

n
netterman

Veteran

106 Kommentare 41 Likes

ich habe natürlich bei weitem nicht die Einblicke die du hier hast, aber einige Jahre hat es scheinbar doch ganz brauchbar funktioniert - sonst wäre man wohl nicht gute 20 Jahre im Geschäft geblieben oder ?

und was ich mitbekommen habe gab es erst bei den letzten 2 Gens scheinbar einige gröbere Konstruktionsfehler wie das Ding mit den 3090 das wohl richtig ins Geld ging ?

ob es sich die anderen (großen) Hersteller da nicht auch etwas einfach machen und mit ihren Garantien weniger kundenfreundlich sind
als sie es sich leisten könnten ?

ich kann wie gesagt nur aus meiner begrenzten Kundensicht sprechen und hatte da im Laufe meines Hardwarelebens (mittlerweile auch schon gut 30 Jahre) gott sei Dank nur 3 defekte Grafikkarten und da war der Ablauf bei Asus mit gut 4 Wochen noch ok, bei Msi trotz einer für damalige Verhältnisse sehr teuren Lightning mit knapp 3 Monaten und vielen Diskussionen (obwohl mit dem Vram eigentlich ein stinknormaler Defekt) ein Graus und dann eben einer evga 1080ti mit nem defekten Display Port wo die Austauschkarte in 7 Tagen ohne Diskussionen wieder bei mir war.

und wenn so ein Support bei einer im Vergleich "kleinen Klitsche" wie evga viele Jahre möglich war ohne damit zu verhungern, frage ich mich schon warum dann die großen für den selben Vorgang Wochen und Monate brauchen, und da geht es gar nicht darum das es nun unbedingt 5 oder 10 Jahre Garantie sein müßen, sondern einfach um die Dauer und den problemlosen Ablauf einer RMA....

Antwort 6 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
M
Mr.Danger

Mitglied

51 Kommentare 28 Likes

Schade um die EVGA GPU Produkte. Ich hatte mir jüngst erst eine RTX 3080 Ti FTW3 gekauft. Geholt haben sie mich wegen des Overclocking Potentials und der Garantieverlängerung. Genau das was ihnen jetzt den wirtschaftlichen Ausstieg vom GPU Markt beschert hat. Aber gut, es gibt andere Anbieter die auch einen guten Job machen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

T
TheSmart

Mitglied

23 Kommentare 8 Likes

Ich habe das mit EVGA am WE bei Golem gelesen und der Artikel dort war schon recht einseitig und auch die Kommentare darunter ebenso.
Als ich das gelesen ahbe ist mir als erstes wieder das New World-Desaster eingefallen. Da war der Grund, wenn ich mich recht entsinne minimal, aber das Ergebnis ruinös. Sowas hätte niemals passieren dürfen. Und wäre wohl einem selbstproduzierenden Boardpartner mit ordentlicher QM niemals passiert.
Da bringen auch es auch keine 10 Jahre Garantie. Wie Igor schon sagte..was bringt einem die lange Garantie, wenn der Hersteller deswegen in die Knie geht? Dann ist auch jegliche Garantie futsch^^

Aber jetzt müssen sich viele echt umsehen auf dem Markt. Ich lese es hier..aber ich habe es auch schon woanders gelesen. Und nicht nur im GrKa-Geschäft:
Die RMA-Abteilung wird als reiner Kostenfakter behandelt und das ist mittel bis langfristig nicht gut.
Denn eine gute RMA mit kurzen Reaktionszeiten und guten Support könnte man auch noch als verkaufsfördernd bezeichnen, wegen dem Image.
Aber nunja.. jetzt gibt es halt gar keine Marke mehr mit irre langer Garantie und ich fürchte das wird sich nicht positiv auf die RMA-Abteilungen der anderen Hersteller auswirken.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Lagavulin

Mitglied

66 Kommentare 66 Likes

Vielen Dank für die Einschätzung und die interessanten Einblicke. Dass EVGA eine hohe RMA-Quote hat, war mir gar nicht bekannt. Ich hätte das auch nie vermutet, denn EVGA bietet ja gegen Aufpreis eine Garantieverlängerung an. 2018 waren das noch maximal 10 Jahre ab Kaufdatum, später nur noch 7 Jahre. Diese 10 Jahre Garantieverlängerung habe ich mir Ende 2018 beim Kauf meiner EVGA RTX 2080 geleistet – und inzwischen enttäuscht feststellen müssen, dass ich die Garantiebedingungen nicht genau gelesen hatte. Die Garantie ist nämlich nicht (beim Verkauf auf den Käufer) übertragbar. Und ob es EVGA Ende 2028 noch gibt, dürfte auch in den Sternen stehen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

F
Fonsa

Mitglied

43 Kommentare 27 Likes

Evga war eigentlich das Amazon unter den Grafikkarten. Man zahlt(e) (gerne) etwas mehr um dann im Fall des Falles keinen Stress mit der RMA zu haben. Schade für den Kunden, gut für die Konkurrenz.

Im Bekanntenkreis ist eine 980 in der Garantie abgeraucht, Ersatz war Kommentarlos eine 1080.

Antwort 3 Likes

ssj3rd

Veteran

101 Kommentare 45 Likes
M
MD_Enigma

Mitglied

44 Kommentare 15 Likes

Ich verstehe nicht, warum EVGA mit feuernden Kanonen untergehen will. Das schadet letztendlich nur EVGA selbst, und diskreditiert sich zunehmend selbst. Deine Aussagen unterstreichen das - da scheint ja auch eine Historie dran zu hängen.

Ich kann schon nachvollziehen, dass NVidia ein ziemlich anstrengeder Partner ist. Deutsche Automobilzulieferer können davon ein Lied singen. Da muss man durch und sich strategisch Positionieren, was offensichtlich nicht deren Stärke ist/war. Und das funktioniert schon gar nicht mit schlechter Qualität ;-)

Antwort 2 Likes

e
emulbetsup

Mitglied

14 Kommentare 21 Likes

Danke für deinen Kommentar und deine Einschätzungen. Meiner Meinung nach spielt aber auch noch ein weiterer Aspekt eine wesentliche Rolle, den du hier nicht beleuchtet hast.

Seit Pascal fertigt NV mit den "Founders Editions" selbst Karten für Endkunden. Davor hatte man lediglich die Nachfrage nach den professionellen Lösungen selbst bedient. Zu Pascal bot man lediglich zeitlich begrenzt, wenn auch exklusiv da vor allen anderen, Karten an und war preislich auch noch über dem eigenen MSRP. Mit Turing und Ampere wurde das eigene Engagement ernsthafter, da man deutlich mehr Karten über die gesamte Lebensspanne und zum eigenen MSRP angeboten hat. Zusätzlich verwischt man diese beiden Rollen zunehmend, die man nun inne hat (Chipentwickler und Hersteller von Grafikkarten) und trifft in der einen Rolle Entscheidungen, die Einfluss auf die andere Rolle haben. Dieser Aspekt verändert das Geschäft der Boardpartner dauerhaft und sehr nachhaltig.

Im Computerbase-Forum habe ich dazu den folgenden, umfangreicheren Kommentar verfasst:

Antwort 2 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
M
MD_Enigma

Mitglied

44 Kommentare 15 Likes

@emulbetsup Das ist ja alles nachvollziehbar. Wenn ich als Partner merke, dass mein Lieferant einen Direktvertrieb aufbaut und auch als direkte Konkurenz positioniert, dann muss man handeln. Aber nicht so.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Advertising

Advertising