CPU Latest news Notebooks

Rembrandt illustrated: AMD’s Ryzen 6000 Mobile with Zen 3+, RDNA 2, DDR5 | technology details, gaming and application performance

We already had all the relevant information about the Ryzen 6000 for mobile use at CES, but AMD has now added some more details. Zen3+ features the improved Zen 3 cores with up to 5 GHz clock and a new RDNA 2 graphics with a targeted doubling of performance. The whole thing is manufactured in TSMC’s N6 and also features a completely new platform with DDR5/LPDDR5 support as well as USB 4.0. Figuratively speaking: with Rembrandt you paint yourself a new future.

But what actually is Zen 3+? We see an optimized version of the known cores, which is designed for even more efficiency and is therefore only installed in the notebook in this form for now. AMD’s new Power Management Framework (PMF) adds to this. I have also exported all relevant slides for you, there is enough illustration and explanation in detail, which also includes the many changes including new instructions in this area. But for efficiency, you also need additional sleep modes for the CPU. The technical rest of Zen3+ to Zen 3 is then largely identical, because the maximum of eight cores is still available for the APUs and the combined L2 and L3 cache is up to 20 MBytes as usual. You are welcome to read through all of this again in the original:

 

AMD also significantly upgrades the platform with Ryzen 6000 Mobile. PCI Express 4.0 is not only used for SSDs but also for graphics cards. USB 4 (instead of Thunderbolt 4) with up to 40 Gbit/s is also on board. Unlike Intel, the memory support no longer relies on DDR4, but offers everyone between DDR5-4800 as an entry-level up to LPDDR5-6400 for OC systems.  AV1 decoding via hardware is of course set and security is further improved. Microsoft Pluton is now also represented as a security processor for the first time.

 

In the meantime, it also took what felt like eternities for the Vega architecture to finally get a potent successor in the notebook segment. In the meantime, Vega already had the status of an undead, so the change was long overdue. RDNA is logically skipped directly and RDNA 2 is used instead. In addition, there are also 12 CUs again with the new Rembrandt APU, which naturally sells better. DXR support included. 

TSMC’s N6 process also allows an even higher clock for the integrated GPU. Because the up to 2.4 GHz is also a new top value for a mobile, integrated solution. Unfortunately, the Infinity Cache does not exist (probably also due to space). This will definitely depress the performance, since the very similar RX 6300M for dedicated notebook solutions at least has 8 MB Infinity Cache and also supports GDDR6. This is accompanied by a new nomenclature, as the RDNA-2 variants with 12 CUs are marketed as Radeon 680M, while those with 6 CUs are marketed as Radeon 660M.

AMD sees the iGPU in a quite optimistic light, especially for gaming, and they feel quite well positioned:

 

Thanks to half more CUs, significantly more clock and a completely new architecture, you can basically assume a doubling of the iGPU’s performance in many areas, which is also seen for many application fields where the interaction of CPU and iGPU often matters in total. Based on the current framework conditions and the targeted performance, AMD expects a decent push, which should be expressed in a lot of new notebooks. Most announcements from the manufacturers report larger delivery volumes from March 2022, but the Pro offshoots will probably be released much later, since AMD is unfortunately still keeping a low profile in this regard.

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,391 Kommentare 762 Likes

Stimme allgemein zu; ein deutlicher Fortschritt, v.a. die iGPU ist deutlich besser als bei den Vorgängern, und die waren schon nicht schlecht. Allerdings ist diese Aussage doch nicht ganz richtig: "Die Speicherunterstützung setzt im Gegensatz zu Intel nicht mehr auf DDR4, sondern bietet alle zwischen DDR5-4800 als Einstieg bis hin zu LPDDR5-6400 für OC-Systeme." Jetzt unterstützt Alder Lake auch für Mobile Systeme eben auch DDR5 und LPDDR5, während AMD einem hier keine Wahl lässt. Und je nach der Preisentwicklung für DDR5 und LPDDR5 ist die Möglichkeit, auch DDR4 oder LPDDR4 einzusetzen, eben auch ein Vorteil.

Antwort Gefällt mir

a
apollo567

Mitglied

15 Kommentare 1 Likes

Hallo,
Hab ich das richtig verstanden: falls AMD sich entschliessen sollte, doch eine Desktop Variante der 6000er Serie herauszubringen, dann wäre das nicht mehr auf Sockel AM4 möglich, da nur DDR5 unterstützt wird ?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,100 Kommentare 18,583 Likes
Gurdi

Urgestein

1,370 Kommentare 900 Likes

Wow die ersten Berichte über Laptops mit den neuen APUs sind ja mal wirklich Hammer, da steckt echt einiges drin in dem Prozzi vor allem im relevanten TDP Bereich bis 50 Watt.

Antwort Gefällt mir

LurkingInShadows

Urgestein

1,345 Kommentare 549 Likes

"up to x2 graphics performance" (1. slideshow, seite 16) ganz toll wenn die graka jetzt 28W statt 15W kriegt.....

Da besteht der Fortschritt zur ach so gescholtenen vega doch nur darin dass man mehr CUs untergebracht hat...

Antwort Gefällt mir

N
Novasun

Veteran

124 Kommentare 75 Likes

Beim Notebook? Bitte wo hat man denn da die Wahl? LPDDR wird doch meine ich sogar nur fest verlötet.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Ender91

Mitglied

29 Kommentare 4 Likes

AMD hätte zumindestens eine dieser neuen APUs auch für den AM4 Sockel mit DDR4 controllern bringen können, DDR4 5066mhz kits kosten mit ca. 150€ auch nicht mehr die welt wie früher.

Antwort Gefällt mir

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,391 Kommentare 762 Likes

Beim Kaufen. Zumindest in den nächsten Monaten wird man kaum ein Notebook mit 16 GB LPDDR5 unter € 1000 finden, eins mit 16 GB LPDDR4 aber schon. Solange DDR5 und LPDDR5 noch ziemlich teuer sind, ist die Möglichkeit, sich doch für deutlich mehr RAM als LPDDR4 zum gleichen (oder niedrigeren) Preis zu entscheiden, für mich ein Vorteil. Gerade weil man bei Notebooks selten oder gar nicht nachrüsten kann. Ich hab lieber 16 GB LPDDR4 als 8 GB LPDDR5.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Genie_???

Veteran

219 Kommentare 69 Likes

Wie ist das eigentlich mit dem Pluton (Sicherheits^^)Prozessor?

Ist da mittlerweile mehr bekannt wie sich der verhält und ob der deaktivierbar ist?
Ich meine, unter Linux braucht man den ja nun wirklich nicht.
So eine unbekannte Wanze mit unbekannten Funktionen im System tut ja nun auch nicht Not.

Antwort Gefällt mir

LurkingInShadows

Urgestein

1,345 Kommentare 549 Likes

Bös formuliert: Wen interessiert am Notebookmarkt Linux?

Antwort Gefällt mir

f
funkdas

Urgestein

632 Kommentare 259 Likes

Mich. Läuft total super, bin total zufrieden.

Antwort Gefällt mir

LurkingInShadows

Urgestein

1,345 Kommentare 549 Likes

Dass es einige gibt war mir klar; aber ist diese Gruppe groß genug für AMD? Bzw. ist der Chip überhaupt gedacht dafür abschaltbar (ich mein jetzt nicht das Konzept an sich, sondern Hardware und interne SW) zu sein?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung