Hardware Latest news PSU System Technology

On bang and drop – power failure as a power supply killer

Who doesn’t know it, that moment of unbridled hatred when the power generally goes out. So when not only the fuse does its work, but the whole place suddenly goes dark? Storm or no storm, it doesn’t even have to be a direct lightning strike, which then gives the domestic electronics the final neck break. This is exactly what happened to Pascal yesterday, who was in the middle of fan testing. The PSU grilled in this way was a 2 year old Seasonic Focus 850 watt, although it could probably have been any brand, so it’s not the PSU manufacturer’s fault.

What happened? There was the infamous one-two punch. So power off and just a fraction of a second later another hit with a brutal surge, effectively an off-on-whole-off. THW and the utility are still pondering what ultimately triggered it, as there was both a thunderstorm nearby and a substation that was partially flooded. I know of two similar cases from my own laboratory, where there were capital overvoltages, but the installed technology was able to intercept them. Overall, the damage pattern only affects the immediate input area, so lucky (and a suitably equipped power supply). Because that could have turned out differently. 

In the grilled PSU, it hit the MOV (metal oxide varistor) and the relay (pictured above) in the input section, the latter even flaring slightly and giving off a nice smoke. By the way, you can also see it on the coil in the input area (picture below), which almost left burn marks on the insulation foil due to the high flowing currents. One has to give credit to Seasonic that nothing else broke, because even the EM8569A (Excelliance, picture above) right next to it, which realizes the standby circuit, did not burst.

Incidentally, surges are not even as rare as one might think and it really is expedient and sensible to protect oneself better here in detail and also to insure oneself. Home contents insurance including natural hazards? Well, you also have to read the fine print, because most policies only cover thunderstorms if there is real fire damage. However, panic is also not a good advisor and you can also insure yourself to death. But expert advice from a trained realtor (not door-to-door salesman) can help, that’s not my area of expertise.

And what about protection? External lightning protection, i.e. the installation of so-called lightning rods (e.g. interception rods), is also a matter for the building owner, as one is usually exposed to the existing situation. For internal lightning protection (lightning protection equipotential bonding), however, you can also take action yourself. However, there are three levels here as well. According to DIN VDE 0100-443/-534, surge protection has been a mandatory requirement in private residential construction as well as small commercial construction since 2018, but what do you do if the system is already older?

Of course, the first stage in the pre-meter area is ideal, as directly at the house connection. This is then the protection for the rough, but as a tenant you can hardly claim it from the homeowner. However, in the middle area, i.e. the apartment, you can have a surge protector installed in the apartment distributor or your own fuse box by a qualified electrical contractor (this is up to you). These are then usually low three-digit amounts, although here too the landlord must be contacted beforehand. The picture below shows another example of a DSL splitter destroyed by lightning because the telecommunication feed was also not protected. However, these are solvable problems.

A so-called fine protection, on the other hand, can be attached anywhere and individually and in the end not only protects against the unfiltered residue of a larger impact, but also protects the devices from each other. Many consumers also generate uncontrolled power surges when switched on, which in turn can cause other devices to switch off (and even become defective). Surely anyone can fit a fine guard like this and, if you evaluate the fault pattern of our PSU, it would probably have protected the PSU in this case. You can get these parts in the shops from about 8 to 10 euros (surge protection in plug form) and they are also quite helpful in the case of insurance, because you can show a certain initiative for prevention.

There are also power strips with integrated fine protection, but here the protection of the devices among each other does not occur. Nevertheless, I would not want to miss something like this here in the office and laboratory. For once, I’m going to be a cable messie and at least show you the double-protected power strip I use under each of the desks. I don’t have one place in my work and home environment where connected home electronics would not be protected. And no, it’s not a fit of paranoia, it’s dearly paid experience from back in the day.

The picture shows an example of one of my double power strips (I could have cleaned it once), whose mechanical off switch I also use while I’m away. True disconnection in absence is first civic duty. Both circuits are also individually protected against overvoltage, so I have separated the powerful audio system on the desktop, including the subwoofer, lamps, and junk (left side) from the PC and peripherals. Good mouldings are not cheap, however, and you can easily pay up to 50 euros for them. But it’s certainly worth it (pun).

Since I do not want to make any advertisement, I have intentionally not included any further pictures or direct links of any products, because also this article cannot and does not want to replace professional advice. But in times of changing climatic conditions and more frequent storms, it should be an important food for thought to perhaps protect the expensive home electronics more actively and better. Sure, fine protection can’t solve everything, but in a large apartment building, it’s at least a start that anyone can implement first, even without a landlord.

Lade neue Kommentare

RedF

Urgestein

1,120 Kommentare 384 Likes

Jetzt muss ich aber doch nach einer empfehlung fragen. Denn wer schonmal die eine oder andere Steckerleiste geöffnet hat, weiß das sich die billige no name und die teure Brennenstuhl ( ok nicht das top Model ) im inneren nicht unterscheiden. Beides der gleiche billige mist.

Antwort 1 Like

Case39

Urgestein

1,905 Kommentare 520 Likes

Belkin, APC oder gar ein Gerät direkt an der Schukodose. Hab mir kürzlich eins von DEHN geholt. Dies hat mein altes Wago Gerät (das Wago hat aber meinen Üspannumgs Schaden an meinem Sea Sonic NT nicht verhindert) ersetzt.
Eine richtige zwei oder drei Stufige Lösung ist aber vorzuziehen (wenn möglich).
Natürlich ist eine entsprechenede Hausratversicherung empfehlenswert!

Antwort 2 Likes

RedF

Urgestein

1,120 Kommentare 384 Likes

Ja am Rechner habe ich eine von Belkin.

Antwort 2 Likes

g
goch

Veteran

309 Kommentare 82 Likes

Ich setze hier auch gerne auf die kleinen Serien oder Heimserien von denen, mit denen ich auch im professionellen Bereich Zusammenarbeite. Schneider Electric/APC, Eaton oder Rittal (alle Steckdosenleisten sind von letzterem, da merkt man noch Material und Substanz). Wenn man das einmal mit einer Baumarkt Steckdose vergleicht, merkt auch der Laie sofort den Unterschied.

Antwort 2 Likes

DHAmoKK

Urgestein

1,525 Kommentare 464 Likes

Hmm, je nachdem, wie groß der Abstand zwischen Strom aus und Spannungsspitze war, hätte in meinem Fall die USV die Hardware geschützt.

Antwort 1 Like

Case39

Urgestein

1,905 Kommentare 520 Likes

Ne USV wäre ebenfalls ne Lösung.

Antwort Gefällt mir

W
Wie jetzt?

Mitglied

21 Kommentare 16 Likes

Die abschaltbaren Steckerleisten mit Überspannungsschutz sind ja ganz nett, vermitteln aber zumindest beim Punkt "Abschalten" eine trügerische Sicherheit. Ich kenne keine Steckdosenleiste die allpolig trennt. Immer ist nur eine Ader über den Schalter geführt - und die schaltet je nachdem wie der Stecker in der Dose steckt halt eben entweder die Phase oder den N. Und in Abhängigkeit von der Herkunft der Überspannung genügt das nicht. Wird die Phase geschaltet und die Überspannung kommt durch einen bodennahen Blitzeinschlag wird das Potential des N angehoben - peng. Umgekehrt funktioniert das auch - ist der N abgeschaltet und die Überspannung kommt durch eine Schalthandlung aus dem Netz ist i.d.R. der Aussenleiterr, also die Phase, betroffen. Also auch hier - peng. Gut, man hat ja immer noch den integrierten Überspannungsschutz, der sollte bei normengerechter Auslegung der elektrischen Anlage genügen. Also Blitzstromableiter im NAR (netzseitiger Anschlussraum, also unter dem Zähler), im besten Fall deckt der schon Typ I, II und neuerdings auch III ab, danach nach spätestens 10m Leitungslänge wieder einen Überspannungsableiter Typ II. Aber so dürften die wenigsten ausgestattet sein. Wer auf Nummer sicher gehen will zieht in Abwesenheit den Stecker oder macht es wie ich - allpolige Abschaltung mit einem 2-poligen Schalter.

Antwort 2 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
0ldn3rd

Mitglied

84 Kommentare 45 Likes

@Wie jetzt? Also ich habe die Steckdosenleisten hier in der Bude alle auf die, der Firma Feuerstuhl(Oder so ähnlich) umgestellt. Alle bisher ohne Überspannungsschutz.

Aber im Punkt der Trennung muss ich die widersprechen. Die Dosenleisten hier trennen definitiv beide Kontakte, Also L und N egal wo und wie die eingesteckt ist. Hab es gerade extra nochmal nachgemessen.
Das war bei mir auch der "damals" der Grund, das Geld in die Hand zu nehmen und den Baumarkt Mist zu entsorgen. Ok der andere Grund war, das bei dem Baumarkt Mist auch am Leiterquerschnitt innerhalb der Dosenleiste gerne mal gespart wird.

Auch einige Funksteckdosen und die von meinem SmartHome-Sarotti trennen beide Kontakte!

Zum Thema....

Ich hab die Überspannungsthematik auch mal ins Auge gefasst, ist aber dann wieder eingeschlafen bei mir....
Aber da die Netzqualität quasi täglich "besser" wird im besten Deutschland was es jemals gab und geben wird....

Werde ich das nun auch nochmal in Angriff nehmen.
Hat jemand Erfahrung im Heim-Bereich mit USV? Also um den PC grad noch fix runter zu fahren etc... ?

Gibts hier schon nen Thread dazu? (Sorry muss grad eigentlich arbeiten, und kann grad nicht ne Stunde das Netz oder /Forum durchforsten)

Gruß
0ldn3rd

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Case39

Urgestein

1,905 Kommentare 520 Likes

Oder man besorgt sich Steckdosenleisten, die es erlauben, den Querschnitt der internen Verkabelung, Zuleitung samt Schalter zu ändern.
Hab da etwas Erfahrung in meiner HIFI Zeit gesammelt.

Antwort Gefällt mir

g
goch

Veteran

309 Kommentare 82 Likes

In Sachen Elektrotechnik bin ich leider nicht so tief drin. Wie schaut es denn hiermit aus "3 Schutzschaltungen (L – N, L – PE, N – PE)"?:

Ansonsten gehen wir im professionellen Umfeld danacha, dass nur eine ONLINE USV wirklich schützt. Hier kommt der Strom nie ungepuffert durch, was bei einer normalen USV der Fall ist.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung