CPU Editor's Desk Latest news System

Exclusive info about Intel’s Alder Lake-S – Will the Intel Core-1800 be a threat to AMD?

Disclaimer: The following article is machine translated from the original German, and has not been edited or checked for errors. Thank you for understanding!

Intel wants and needs to set with Alder Lake as 12th generation a big mark in the mainstream market for desktop CPUs this year, if they don’t want to lose the connection (also from their target group’s point of view). And it is not only a repainted and further upgraded 14 nm CPU, but in addition to the smaller structure width of 10 nm (according to Intel’s reading), it is finally also a completely new architecture with a completely different solution approach. Can certainly work out, but the outcome is a bit uncertain, at least for now, looking at AMD’s Warhol. Now, however, an engineering sample (ES) of an Intel Core-1800 has surfaced, which already tells me and thus us a bit more in so many respects.

But what are Intel’s plans? For the first time, the Big Little approach, which has already been used for many years in the ARM SoCs of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, is being used. The principle is actually as simple as it is efficient, because large and small processing cores cleverly divide the work between themselves, depending on the load. The less demanding tasks are outsourced to power-saving, small Atom cores, while the larger cores are then assigned the more computationally intensive tasks and are of course allowed to consume more power in return. This is all already known.

In the ES of the Core-1800 in the (not final) B0-stepping presented today, there are 8 large Golden Cove cores (Core) and 8 small Gracemont cores (Atom) on the die. While the big cores are also capable of hyperthreading, this is not the case with the Atom cores. In total, you’ll find 16 cores that can process a maximum of 24 threads. According to various leaks, Intel quantifies the performance leap compared to a conventional solution (unfortunately not specified) with up to 20 percent in pure single-thread scenarios and a doubling of the multi-thread performance in the ideal case, which seems quite optimistic when you consider a current 8-core of the 11th generation.

The processor, internally called Intel Core-1800, sits in the new Socket V (LGA 1700) and has a TDP of 125 watts. The screenshot below, which I modified slightly to protect the source, shows a time of 56 seconds for the PL1 and a peak time of 2.44 ms for the PL2 of a whopping 228 watts. That this up- and down-switching is well suited to aggravate the already nervous load change behavior of the current Intel CPUs even more doesn’t even have to be mentioned. This is where the voltage converters of the mainboards come into play.

The revision B0 of this ES is still quite early and the base clock is also still quite low with only 1800 MHz. More interesting are the Turbo Boost limits of the big cores, where 1-2 cores are already supposed to reach 4.6 GHz, with 3-4 cores it’s still 4.4 GHz, with 5-6 cores 4.2 GHz and with all 8 cores then 4 GHz. The small Atom cores clock with up to 3.4 GHz with <=4 used cores, otherwise only with 3 GHz. The image above also shows a voltage value that Intel locates at 1.3147 V. The rest is self-explanatory.

According to the initial information, the new desktop CPUs will support up to dual-channel DDR5-4800 memory and the DDR4-enabled motherboards will support modules up to 3200-MHz. Supposedly, only the high-end Z690 motherboards will offer DDR5 support, while all cheaper variants will still rely on DDR4. This would then give Intel and also the motherboard manufacturers much more flexibility and security when it comes to the still unclear DDR5 mass production.

Another big upgrade coming with Alder Lake-S is support for PCIe Gen5. The CPU will have 16 PCIe Gen5 capable lanes and in addition 4 lanes in PCIe Gen4 standard. The 600 chipset itself will then support Gen4 and even still Gen3. In addition, the Direct Media Interface (DMI) has been upgraded to Gen4. If there is any further information, I will of course not withhold it from you.

Lade neue Kommentare

A
Axelcio

Neuling

6 Kommentare 5 Likes

Guten Morgen, vielen Dank für den interessanten Artikel.
Im Text direkt über dem Bild fehlt ein "j" bei: ...muss man a noch...
Wobei es so einen bayerischen Hauch hat, finde ich auch nett. Liebe Grüße aus dem Süden:-)

Antwort Gefällt mir

B
Besterino

Urgestein

5,372 Kommentare 2,249 Likes

Manno. Können die nicht mal ein paar PCIE-Lanes mehr mitgeben?

Schnellere Lanes sind ja nett, aber mehr Steckkarten als eine GPU sind trotzdem nicht drin.

Antwort 1 Like

dadadi

Mitglied

34 Kommentare 8 Likes

228W - lol
Solange der relativ niedrige Energieverbrauch im Idle wieder zurückkommt...

Antwort Gefällt mir

P
Perdakles

Neuling

9 Kommentare 1 Likes

Der Multiplikator bei 5-6 Kernen in dem Bild (42x) deutet doch eher auf 4.2 statt 4.3 GHz hin oder?

Müsste es in diesem Satz sowie in dem gesamten Abschnitt nicht PCIe statt PCI heißen?

Nun aber genug gemeckert. Ich liebe es hier morgens mit einem :coffee: den neuesten Gerüchten auf den Grund zu gehen. Danke Igor für diesen Einblick :)(y)

Antwort Gefällt mir

T
Tarkin77

Neuling

5 Kommentare 3 Likes

Geht ein B0 Stepping nicht eher schon in Richtung QS/Retail?

RKL ist auch B0 (https://www.guru3d.com/articles-pages/intel-core-i9-11900k-processor-review,4.html)

Antwort 2 Likes

S
Stele77

Mitglied

10 Kommentare 2 Likes

Cool, Igor the leaker ist wieder am Werk!
Was mich aber noch 1000X mehr interessieren würde: Was zur Hölle ist jetzt bei AMD auf der Roadmap?
Zen 3+ auf 6NM, auf 7NM, gar kein Zen3+ und Zen4 erst ende 2022??
Da scheint sich ja keiner mehr auch nur halbwegs einig zu sein!
Ich denke, Ich bin nicht alleine mit der Frage.. :)

Antwort 2 Likes

B
Besterino

Urgestein

5,372 Kommentare 2,249 Likes

...ist aber hier eine Intel News... ;) Bin sicher, Igor bringt eine AMD News, sobald er AMD News hat. :D

EDIT & Nachtrag: wobei 16+8 ja schonmal eine Verbesserung sind. Da bekäme ich ja einen Port meiner Dual-100gbit-Netzwerkkarte mit ca. 60% ausgereizt (die NIC kann leider nur PCIe 3). :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

Zer0Strat

Mitglied

57 Kommentare 36 Likes

Weiß man schon was über die Caches?

Antwort Gefällt mir

konkretor

Veteran

148 Kommentare 115 Likes

Ich finde den Ansatz sehr spannend. Mal sehen was die 10 nm Fertigung so reißen kann. Wenn jetzt alle Jammern wegen der hohen TDP. Das muss im endgültigen Produkt ja nicht so sein. Wir reden hier über eine ES CPU. Da gibt es oft mehr Freiheiten um diverses zu testen.

Ist Big-Little nicht ein geschützter Markenname von Arm?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Case39

Urgestein

1,945 Kommentare 559 Likes

Bin mal wegen den Lastwechselspitzen gespannt. Wird wohl eine sehr stressige Angelegenheit für die Spannungsversorgung des Boards und Netzteil.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung