GPUs Latest news PSU

Completely superfluous: Who (currently) needs expensive power supplies with ATX 3.0 and PCIe 5.0?

First of all, we need to separate the terms and standards before we should even think about buying a new ATX 3.0 power supply. And to bring it right at the beginning times to the point: Panic buying is completely out of place and more or less intentional marketing! Or to put it more casually: in principle, no one needs the whole thing yet. However, I must also note, then there can be different situations for a purchase decision. That’s where it gets interesting, though. By the way, I had already published some parts of today’s article, spread across older articles – but you now have to compare the whole thing with the real existing graphics cards including measured values again and completely re-evaluate it. And neither Ada nor RDNA3 are PCIe 5.0 graphics cards.

12VHPWR connector on a current power supply

PCIe 5.0 is still in the stars for the PSU

What interests us at the power company in terms of PCIe 5.0 is solely the new 12VHPWR supply connector, which is supposed to make the tiresome multiple adapter obsolete. Unfortunately, the current implementations are very “ready”, but they don’t offer anything new except for the two sense pins for the power consumption. Because the other two signals require completely new power supply designs, because it’s actually supposed to come down to smart communication. This is something that neither the current power supplies can offer (even those with the current PCIe 5.0 “Ready” label) nor the current graphics cards! At least the PCI SIG has left the two additional pins optional, which is complete nonsense. After all, a little pregnant does not work in the end.

The S4 (i.e. the outer pin) is supposed to finally get its own function officially in the next revision (after they also move the pins further back into the connector to log a secure engagement). This will then look like that the graphics card (as already implemented now) does not start at all on its own, should the ground connection be missing here. Pure cosmetics, because that’s what Pin S2 was actually intended for. Stupidly, this important function is completely missing so far. On the graphics card and power supply sides. But I will come to that in a moment. Ergo, the whole PCIe 5.0 readiness story is only a farce at this point.

What is actually missing? Almost everything!

The still missing pin S2 for CARD_CBL_PRES would have even two functions. According to the standard, the graphics card first sends a signal to the power supply that it has recognized that the power plug is connected correctly. Do you notice anything? This control function should actually ensure that a safe plugging in should be guaranteed! However, since all this has been generously omitted for backward compatibility reasons so far, we don’t have to wonder about defective 12VHPWR plugs either.

In addition, the power supply provides a signal to the graphics card that it has been detected as a consumer and this current state of readiness is passed to the Power Budgeting Sense Detect Register5. This is used to allow the system to map which system/power cable source is connected to which port on a particular PCIe card slot. Currently missing on all graphics cards, power supplies as well as motherboards.

Pin S1 for CARD_PWR_STABLE, which is also generously skipped, serves as an independent indicator for the proper state of the power supply from the graphics card, via the cable, to the power supply. Activation of this signal on the graphics board indicates that the local busbars are within their operating limits (monitoring of ongoing operation!). This signal can provide the power supply with error detection from the graphics card and provides the power supply with an additional means of protection. Currently missing on all graphics cards and in all power supplies.

Sleeved, relatively rigid 12VHPWR cable from be quiet!

Fact is: it currently makes no sense at all to rely on a native 12VHPWR plug on the power supply (cable picture above)! Because it can’t offer anything else than the same (limited) functionality that a normal accessory cable of the power supply manufacturer from 2x 8-pin (or 2x 12 pin) to the 12VHPWR on the graphics card side does! On the contrary, the thin 12VHPWR connector in the power supply is the next failure candidate for melting connections due to the limited bending radii and operating safety. One has actually only disadvantages with this part at the moment!

Flexible ribbon cable to 12VHPWR from be quiet!

If you look at the following picture, where the sleeve has been removed, you can see two 12-pin connectors with very flexible 18AWG cable at be quiet, where the 24 cables were only crimped together after a few centimeters to the 12 thick 16AWG cables. This solution is also available simpler with 2x 8-pin (6 cables used each) without merging. Personally, I also prefer this three times over the 12VHPWR on the power supply in the tight space available.

Ideal case of a multiple cable with crimped merging (be quiet!)

Conclusion: PCIe 5.0 on the power supplies and graphics cards is still a sham

If we look at what has been said so far, we conclude that everything that is currently offered as PCIe 5.0 compatible is actually nothing more than old iron with a new connector on the power supply. But it actually gets worse, because the glut of power supplies equipped with a 12VHPWR cable and marketed as PCIe 5.0 “Ready” or “Compliant” is already rapidly increasing, so the lines will become more and more blurred here.

How these 12VHPWR cables are then connected to the power supply is currently completely irrelevant, because only the two well-known sense pins are occupied anyway. That, which would make the connection really smart, is completely missing on all graphics cards and also in the announced new power supplies. It simply does not need anyone at the moment! The PCI SIG’s intentionally built in loophole to generally only handle the two smart pins as optional then makes this “standard” completely obsolete for the user. Transparent is different.

For reasons of better manageability, I would rather go for a good ATX 2.52 (and higher) power supply, which either comes with the 12VHPWR cable as an accessory or whose manufacturer offers such a cable as an option. Thus, this power supply is no longer different from the ATX 3.0 power supplies with PCIe 5.0 “compatibility” that are now coming out. What then makes (or should make) the part with ATX 3.0, you can read on the next page.

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

Lucky Luke

Veteran

405 Kommentare 181 Likes

Danke für die ausführliche Erläuterung.
Spannender Artikel. Werde wohl meine Kaufentscheidung in Bezug auf ATX 3.0 überdenken und lieber ein effizientes NT der aktuellen Spezifikationen zurückgreifen zum halben Preis der ATX 3.0

Antwort 4 Likes

grimm

Urgestein

3,080 Kommentare 2,030 Likes

Danke für die klaren Worte, ich dachte es mir. Möge dein Artikel die ein oder andere Kaufentscheidung beeinflussen und uns einen großen Haufen unnötig ausgemusterter Netzteile ersparen!

Antwort 3 Likes

big-maec

Urgestein

819 Kommentare 474 Likes

Schön zu lesen, dass mein Netzteil noch weiter im Rechner werkeln kann.
Aber ab wann werden die Grafikkarten, die smarte Kommunikation implementiert haben, dass man um ein neues NT nicht mehr herumkommt.
Gibt es da schon eine Roadmap?

Antwort 1 Like

Derfnam

Urgestein

7,517 Kommentare 2,029 Likes

Ich denke, dass eine Roadmap immo sinnlos ist. Zu viele Baustellen und Umleitungen.

Antwort 1 Like

Martin Gut

Urgestein

7,740 Kommentare 3,555 Likes

Die Frage ist nicht, ab wann es die Kommunikation (optional) gibt, sondern ab wann man ohne die Kommunikation Leistungseinschränkungen hat.

Bis jetzt ist ja noch nicht mal etwas erfunden oder spezifiziert was nicht optional wäre. Somit fliesst auch nichts solches in die Entwicklung der nächsten Generation an Grafikkarten und Netzteilen ein die momentan in der Entwicklung sind.

Über etwas zu spekulieren, was erst noch entwickelt wird (werden könnte) und dann vielleicht mal in die Entwicklung einfliessen und umgesetzt werden könnte, halte ich für wenig sinnvoll.

Antwort 1 Like

ssj3rd

Veteran

214 Kommentare 142 Likes

Habe hier auch ein süßes Seasonic 700 Watt Netzteil und sogar Fanless mit:
4090 Strix OC + AIO + 5900X + 7 Lüfter + zig RGB‘s ohne jegliche Probleme am laufen.

Selbst mit 133% unter AB konnte ich keine Abstürze provozieren und ich habe es echt hart darauf angelegt - rock stable!

Wollte trotzdem im nächsten Jahr wegen Zukunftssicherheit und so auf ein ATX 3.0 wechseln, aber das kann ich mir wohl definitiv sparen… dann warte ich jetzt mal geduldig auf Seasonic‘s 90 Grad Kabel:

Bis dahin behalte ich das 4 köpfige Krakenmonster:

View image at the forums

Antwort 3 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Igor Wallossek

1

10,155 Kommentare 18,727 Likes

Der Adapater.... Meh! :D

Antwort 5 Likes

big-maec

Urgestein

819 Kommentare 474 Likes

R2D2 kann dann löschen.🤣

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,155 Kommentare 18,727 Likes

Das schmilzt doch nur. Ich würde einen Tropfenfänger drunterpacken. Meine Oma hatte sowas für die Kaffeekanne :P

Antwort 4 Likes

F
Furda

Urgestein

663 Kommentare 370 Likes

Ist ja wie bei HDMI, ein Standard der keiner ist, weil optional, und der überteuert zahlende Kunde schaut in die Röhre.

Habs schon vor Monaten gesagt, WENN die neuen Grafikkarten den Standard nutzen und brauchen, dann funktionieren die Grafikkarten NICHT vollständig mit alten Netzteilen, weil eben die Sense Pins FEHLEN bei Adaptern, ebenso die Überlast-Tauglichkeit. Nun lässt man es einfach als "optional" ganz weg. Toller "Standard", tolle Hersteller...

Antwort 2 Likes

Lagavulin

Veteran

226 Kommentare 181 Likes

Vielen Dank für die Bewertung der aktuellen Situation, und die klaren Worte zu Sinn und Unsinn eines „ATX 3.0 ready“ Netzteils für die aktuellen Grafikkarten mit 12VHPWR-Buchse.
Das ist für mich sehr wertvoll, weil ich momentan den Bau einen neuen PC mit einer RTX 4090 plane und bisher nach einem ATX 3.0 Netzteil Ausschau gehalten habe. Das werde ich auch weiterhin tun, aber die Kaufentscheidung alter vs. neuer Netzteil-Standard werde ich vom Preis-/Leistungsverhältnis abhängig machen, ATX 3.0 ist für mich nicht länger gesetzt.

Antwort 3 Likes

Lagavulin

Veteran

226 Kommentare 181 Likes

@Igor Wallossek
Zitat: "In bei nicht wirklich so seltenen Lastspitzen um die 1 ms wäre dann sogar eine Ratio von 2.5 erlaubt, was bei den exemplarisch gemessenen 415 Watt Leistungsaufnahme auf 830 Watt herausliefe"
Hat sich da ein kleiner Rechenfehler eingeschlichen, oder habe ich die Berechnung nicht verstanden?

Antwort 1 Like

Serandi

Mitglied

33 Kommentare 9 Likes

Hoffentlich niemals :)

Antwort 1 Like

Serandi

Mitglied

33 Kommentare 9 Likes

Habe mir noch letztes Jahr VORSORGLICH ein Seasonic Prime Ultra 1300 Watt Platinum Netzteil für die als schier unersättlich gefräßig angekündigten next Gen GPU's besorgt und mir dann voll unnötig Sorgen wegen einem neuen ATX 3.0 Standart gemacht. Bleibe bei diesem schönen Netzteil noch viele weitere Jahre und hab es lediglich für 255€ besorgt und bin extrem happy darüber!

Antwort 1 Like

SchmoWu

Mitglied

91 Kommentare 23 Likes

Bei mir steht in den nächsten halben Jahr ein komplett neues System an, da ist das brauchbares Wissen, Danke dafür.

Antwort Gefällt mir

D
Don Omerta

Mitglied

47 Kommentare 34 Likes

Klasse Bericht, hier vorbeizuschauen lohnt sich immer ;)
Ich wechsle meine Netzteile alle 7-8 Jahre. Habe hier drei NT (BitFenix, Seasonic, Corsair), von sieben bis 10 Jahre Grantie, alles dabei.
Die würden sicherlich auch länger halten aber ich mag keine Überraschungen. Vor ein paar Jahren dachte ich noch "Klasse, alles braucht immer weniger Saft und wird effizienter" aber wir sehen ja, das es nicht so ist.....

Antwort Gefällt mir

Chismon

Veteran

131 Kommentare 93 Likes

Ich hoffe die Nachricht/der Artikel hier macht auch anderweitig die Runde im Internet (vielleicht auch per YT-Video), denn das kommt potentiellen Kunden nur zugute, sich nicht von dem ATX 3.0 Standard Angst machen zu lassen beim Netzteilkauf.

Positiver Seiteneffekt ist die Ersparnis (denn ATX Netzteile sind dann doch schon spuerbar teurer angesetzt von den Herstellern/Boardpartnern) und es kommt auch der Umwelt zugute (Stichwort: Ressourcenverschwendung), wenn die alten ATX 2.X Marken-Netzteile erst einmal noch locker reichen sollten fuer den Betrieb von High End GPUs.

Nach dem Kauf meiner RDNA2 Grafikkarte hatte ich auch noch einmal auf die Boardpartner-Empfehlung bzgl. der PSUs geschaut und ja, demnach gerade noch die Empfehlung (850W) abgedeckt (bei anderen Modellen wurden 750W als ausreichend empfohlen).

Allerdings werde ich auch kein High-End Mainboard und keine K-CPU damit im Verbund betreiben und habe daher gar keine Sorge, dass ich da irgendwie in Schwierigkeiten geraten werde (ich rechne mit maximal 550-600W Nennleistung), zumal man alle Komponenten im Regelfall ja auch maechtig treiben muss, um evt. einen Absturz beim Netzteil provozieren zu koennen.

Mich wird dann eher interessieren, was sich in 4-6 Jahren als neuer Standard hoffentlich heraus kristallisieren wird (dass man als Verbraucher/Kaeufer dann auch mehr Durchblick auf Anhieb hat und die Hersteller sich via PC SIG besser einigen und neue Standards bessser planen/umsetzen) und man nicht solche Klarstellungen - fuer die man m.E. nur dankbar sein kann - wie in diesem Artikel mehr braucht, denn das erspart dann doch einigen Stress, Sorgen und Zusatzarbeit.

Antwort 2 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Wie jetzt?

Mitglied

55 Kommentare 44 Likes

Sehr schön das hier endlich einmal jemand den Erklärbären gibt, danke dafür!

Antwort 1 Like

garfield36

Urgestein

1,270 Kommentare 331 Likes

Da ich mir erst heuer ein be quiet! 800W gekauft habe, werde ich sicher nicht auf ein neues NT umsteigen. Auch wenn ich die Absicht hab mir eine RTX 4080 zuzulegen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung