Basics GPUs Graphics Reviews

ATI in reverse gear? 2D performance falls by the wayside | Retro Part 1 of 2

More than 13 years ago, I published two articles that dealt with the problem of the lack of 2D performance of ATI graphics cards in particular at that time and also shed more light on the background. Because the upheaval at that time was enormous: graphics cards with the Unified Shaders instead of special 2D hardware features, operating systems that no longer supported 2D hardware acceleration and an ATI driver team in Toronto that probably hates my guts since that time. Aside from the fact that such things hardly affect me, this very series of articles has led to ATI (now AMD) still doing better than NVIDIA in this very area. Goal achieved, I don’t care about the rest. But back to the retro article, which caused quite a stir internationally back then…

Original article from 12.01.2010

A few months had passed since the introduction of Windows 7. The graphics card manufacturers have partly presented new models, as well as further developed and published drivers. Thus, there should have been enough time to eliminate initial bugs and thus enable objective tests that go beyond a pure beta stage. We therefore thought that it was finally time to not only test the 3D performance of the current hardware generation, but that it could also be worthwhile to take a look at an area that we use daily as a matter of course, but never pay much attention to: the 2D area.

To be honest, however, we have to say upfront that this idea of a more comprehensive test did not come about by chance. While the main focus of most users is almost only on the display speed of the operating system interface and Windows 7 is praised everywhere in comparison to Vista, we unfortunately had to realize that the actual “innovation” of Windows 7, namely the propagated reintroduction of the 2D graphics acceleration that existed until Windows XP and was quietly abolished with Vista, doesn’t quite seem to have arrived at one of the graphics chip manufacturers yet, at least when it comes to the concerns of the clean implementation of GDI (Graphics Device Interface) calls. The so-called “2D graphics” does not only consist of nice fade effects and animated menus with shadows, but first of all of quite trivial things like pixels, lines, curves, rectangles, circles, polygons and much more.

So kam Windows 1.0 auf den Markt

Important preface

We don’t want to give this article an emotional note, even if the supporters of one or the other graphics card faction will surely rub their eyes. Because we didn’t want to believe the results of the first tests, we took extra time in the interest of all concerned to get the most meaningful results possible and to be able to compare them as objectively as possible. We won’t accuse any manufacturer of deliberately neglecting this user area, but understand our article as a contribution and help for those who not only want to play, but also work on their PCs. Based on the fact that it is currently very difficult, for example, to work reasonably productively in the 2D area (simple vector-based drawing and design programs, simple or more complex CAD applications) or to play 2D games in high quality with an HD 5870 and the current drivers under Windows 7, we didn’t just want to criticize across the board, but get to the bottom of the actual causes.

Theory and practice

Since most readers might not be familiar with the actual functions and background of 2D acceleration from Windows XP to Windows 7, we have divided this very extensive article into two parts. In this first part, we will first provide the background and technical basics that are worth knowing, so that the tests in the second part can be understood as they should be interpreted. For this purpose, we have developed our own small benchmark program, which we will of course offer for download to all interested users. In any case, both are informative and worth reading and knowing.

Therefore, let’s start with the basics and realize that a little background knowledge doesn’t necessarily hurt. The year is 1985: Mikhail Gorbachev becomes general secretary of the CPSU, Joschka Fischer becomes the first green minister, Sat. 1 goes on air for the first time and “Cheri Cheri Lady” annoys us for 4 endless weeks as number one of the German hit parade. Beside all these important things, a small, still quite inconspicuous software enters the world almost unnoticed at first, which is nowadays installed on most PCs in a market-leading way: Windows from Microsoft.

„Fensterloses“ Windows ohne überlappende Fenster

“Windowless” Windows without overlapping windows

The idea of putting a graphical attachment on top of the actual, text-based operating system layer is not really new. In this way, companies like Microsoft or Digital Research tried to tap into new, less exclusive buyer groups and make the new PC technology palatable to a broad mass of consumers, since it was finally possible to operate this software without a degree in IT. In contrast to Windows 1.0, however, the competing program GEM could already handle overlapping windows.

Erst Windows 2 wird seinem Namen gerecht
Only Windows 2 lived up to its name

If Windows 2.0 had not been released in 1987, which also mastered this technology, no one would be talking about Windows today. The fact that Windows survived at all in its first two years is primarily thanks to an employee who still polarizes the masses today: Steve Ballmer. His commercial for the first version of Windows, which admittedly still looked rather spartan, is unforgettable. The price is also unforgotten: 99 dollars for a Windows without real windows. Since then, Windows has experienced step-by-step evolutions or even revolutions with the introduction of the respective successor versions. But the actual problem we want to deal with still exists today.

At the latest now, most people will ask themselves why we have gone so far. However, the reason is as simple as obvious. On the basis of the window comparison we have learned that there are actually two task areas – the graphical user interface (here we do not mean the user’s clothing, but the desktop design) including the window management and the pure drawing functions through which these graphics are created. Creating and managing are thus two separate, albeit interdependent, task areas. And while the interface of Windows continues to evolve and change, the basic functions have remained largely the same.

Now, when we speak of 2D acceleration in the following sections in generalized terms, this refers to both the graphical output of the interface and the hardware implementation of the actual drawing commands. Without good management, a factory floor full of workers is doomed to inactivity, and without diligent workers who complete their tasks without frills in the most direct way possible, the best management is superfluous. One cannot and should not separate these requirements in the aggregate.

Well-informed readers know, of course, that there can be no pure 2D graphics under a window-based interface at all. Therefore, in the next section we will clarify why there are pure 2D drawing commands, but why they must be viewed more or less three-dimensionally when graphics are output to the screen.

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

MechUnit

Mitglied

63 Kommentare 38 Likes

Interessanter Hintergundbericht.

Damals (Windows 1.0-3.00) war eben das Amiga OS aufgrund des Systems mit seinen Co-Prozessoren (für 2D hauptsächlich Blitter) und echten überlappenden Fenstern besser, von der schon damals unerschütterlichen Stabilität einmal abgesehen.

Das Mac OS setzte nochmal einen drauf. Auch da gab es ja fast von Anfang an quasi integrierte Hardwarebschleunigung für 2D-Anwendungen.

Dann gab es ja noch SGI-OS - ein Traum.

Präemptives Multitasking und schnelles, flüssiges Arbeiten war man also hier auf den 3 o.g. Systemen schon gewohnt. Ok, auf A500 & A1000 war aufgrund des langsameren Motorola 68000-Prozessors und 512kb-, bzw. 1 MB Chip-RAM und ohne HDD mit Diskettenzugriff die Lade- und Arbeitsgeschwindigkeit etwas langsamer. Dennoch war das ein besseres Gefühl und komfortabler als noch mit Windows 1.0, geschweige denn DOS - dank Blitter und Copper mit nicht 100 dazwischenfunkenden Treibern und Schnittstellen. Die im System fest integrierte Hardware war eben fest im OS integriert. Angebundene Hardware und deren Treiber wurden "hinten dran" geschoben. Reflections, Video Toaster, Cinema 4D oder Lightwave (die beiden letztgenannten dann schon auf AGA-Maschinen aka A4000, später mit Power PC u.a. in Verbindung mit Silicon Graphics) liefen wie Butter. 2,5D-Layer und deren Beschleunigung spielten da aber auch noch keine Rolle.

Das war aber auch ein Vorteil der damaligen geschlossenen Systeme mit aufs Leib zugeschnittenen Betriebssystemen. Der PC war ja offen und es musste ja schon damals auf unterschiedlichen Systemen das OS möglichst performant und stabil laufen. Damit war (und ist) ein PC nicht nur von der dedizierten, modularen Hardware abhängig, sondern auch über seine Schnittstellen und Treiber. Wenn dann noch die 2D-Unterstützung schlecht oder gar nicht integriert ist (schlimmstenfalls noch auf Hardware-, OS-, Schnittstellen- und Treiberebene) fehlt, ist das für flüssiges Arbeiten im Betriebssystem ein Desaster. Das merkte man sogar später tw. in Windows NT oder 2000 auf professionellen Maschinen. Es stockte halt mal oder es gab "Denkpausen".

Ein gutes Beispiel hierfür waren damals auch Emulatoren. Man merkte direkt, wenn auf Hardwareebene einfach die 2D-Beschleunigung fehlte und die CPU dann mehr schuften musste.

Antwort 2 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Lagavulin

Veteran

226 Kommentare 181 Likes

Vielen Dank für den interessanten Blick zurück in die 2010er Jahre. Habe ich mit großem Interesse gelesen, weil ich mich damals noch gar nicht mit PC-Technik beschäftigt habe. Spannt man einen zeitlichen Bogen von ATI bis zum 12VHPWR, dann ist Igor‘sLab für mich wirklich so etwas wie „CSI Chemnitz“ im PC-Bereich.

Antwort 1 Like

F
Furda

Urgestein

663 Kommentare 370 Likes

Irgendwo in dieser Zeit da, wohl noch unter WinXP, hatte ich noch einer der letzten Karten von ATI mit AGP Schnittstelle in Betrieb, als der endgültige Wechsel zu PCI vollzogen geworden war.

Der Artikel hat einige Trigger, bin mal auf den 2. Teil gespannt.

Auf alle Fälle, die Einleitung hier birgt für mich schon jetzt das grösste Ausrufezeichen, nämlich, dass man den Finger in die Wunde drücken muss, um eine Änderung/Verbesserung zu erwirken. Damals schon so und heute immer noch brandaktuell. Da hatte ATI offenbar, wie auch alle anderen immer, negativ darauf reagiert, anstatt einsichtig und konstruktiv sein zu wollen. Von ATIs Treiber-Kultur hat wohl bis heute ein Teil bei AMD überlebt.

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,153 Kommentare 18,721 Likes

Das missgünstige Treiber Team firmiert heute immer noch unter ATI in Toronto und es sind die gleichen Leute, die heute alles verdongelt haben, weil sie das MorePowerTool nicht wollen. Das geht schon seit Jahren so :D

Antwort 4 Likes

Derfnam

Urgestein

7,517 Kommentare 2,029 Likes

Toronto Trittchen - guten Feinden gibt man ein Trittchen. Oder 2.
Wobei ich Ati & the Vandalers mit 'Nowhere Toronto' bevorzuge.

Die damaligen Kommentare unter bzw zu den Artikeln läs ich zu gern nochmal.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Derfnam

Urgestein

7,517 Kommentare 2,029 Likes

Alles gut und schön, @Igor Wallossek, aber ich wollte schon ein wenig Wehmut fühlen wegen der alten Köppe.

Antwort Gefällt mir

C
ChaosKopp

Urgestein

516 Kommentare 534 Likes

Ich erinnere mich noch gut an die zugrunde liegenden Artikel und die Emsigkeit, die Du damals ausgelöst hast

Auch wenn die Treiber-Truppe Dich damals hasste, hast Du das Produkt selbst massiv vorangetrieben.

Eigentlich wäre Dankbarkeit angemessen gewesen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,448 Kommentare 810 Likes

Ja, wenn man darauf hinweist, daß der König nackt dasteht oder der tolle GPU Treiber für die neueste Karte kaum 2D packt, macht man sich schnell unbeliebt. Auch wenn man damit, so wie hier @Igor Wallossek , ATI einen großen Gefallen hattest, denn die Käufer finden solch unterirdische Leistung gar nicht gut. Wie heißt es so schön im Englischen: " No good deed goes unpunished". ATI, anstatt sich zu schämen und für den Hinweis zu danken, wurde ärgerlich und nachtragend.

Antwort Gefällt mir

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,448 Kommentare 810 Likes

Der Toaster auf den großen Amigas waren ja aus gutem Grund jahrelang das Kit der Wahl bei frühen CGI Geschichten. SGI Workstations waren klar besser, aber wer hatte schon soviel Geld? Die waren nämlich richtig teuer, für das Geld konnte man schon ein sehr schönes Auto (Oberklasse, keinen Golf 😀) kaufen .

Antwort 1 Like

MechUnit

Mitglied

63 Kommentare 38 Likes

Allerdings - das waren Preise jenseits von gut und böse :D

Antwort 1 Like

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,448 Kommentare 810 Likes

Waren (und sind) sehr gute Hintergrund Artikel, danke @Igor Wallossek für das Encore! Und jetzt ein paar Fragen zum Stand der Dinge 2023: wie sieht es denn heutzutage mit Unterstützung von 2D und 2.5D Grafik aus? Sind die iGPUs hier eigentlich immer noch gleichauf (oder besser?) als viele dGPUs, und gibt's hier Unterschiede zwischen Intel iGPUs und den AMD APUs?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,153 Kommentare 18,721 Likes

AMD vor NV und Intel :)

APUs gehen, iGP bei Intel eher meh

Antwort 1 Like

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,448 Kommentare 810 Likes

Danke! Auch und gerade wenn man doch einiges machen will, das nach wie vor 2 bzw 2.5D ist; vor allem wenn mehrere UHD Monitore befeuert werden sollen. Interessant, daß AMD aus dem Debakel damals gelernt hat, auch wenn Toronto immer noch schmollt 😁

Antwort 1 Like

P
Postguru

Mitglied

39 Kommentare 6 Likes

Und heute mit einer 6900XT unter Win10
Direct drawing to visible device:
BENCHMARK: DIB-BUFFER AND BLIT

Text: 23245 chars/sec
Line: 28631 lines/sec
Polygon: 12435 polygons/sec
Rectangle: 3229 rects/sec
Arc/Ellipse: 15193 ellipses/sec
Blitting: 14961 operations/sec
Stretching: 1107 operations/sec
Splines/Bézier: 17800 splines/sec
Score: 201

DIB Buffering:
BENCHMARK: DIB-BUFFER AND BLIT

Text: 60096 chars/sec
Line: 151668 lines/sec
Polygon: 631579 polygons/sec
Rectangle: 5491 rects/sec
Arc/Ellipse: 347222 ellipses/sec
Blitting: 58207 operations/sec
Stretching: 7123 operations/sec
Splines/Bézier: 70822 splines/sec
Score: 4510

scheint einiges besser zu laufen .. jedenfalls gepuffert ;)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,153 Kommentare 18,721 Likes

DIB geht direkt in den Speicher, Direct Draw jeder einzelne Pups durch die Renderpipeline.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung