Cooling Fans Reviews

Sharkoon Silent Storm 120 mm ARGB Case Fan Review – Quiet price breaker with amazing throughput

Disclaimer: The following article is machine translated from the original German, and has not been edited or checked for errors. Thank you for understanding!

The relatively new Sharkoon Silent Storm 120 mm ARGB case fan is still underestimated in my opinion, because with street prices of partly less than 11 Euros, you get an ARGB case fan that could not only convince in the test, but is also easy on the wallet. Of course, you have to accept some minor compromises at this price, but the overall package is almost unbeatable. Today’s test will clarify where it might not be quite enough and what you get for the low price.

For currently just under 11 Euros, this ARGB fan is a highly interesting offer from the lower price segment and a 3-pack is already said to be in planning. And exactly here we come to the biggest drawback right at the beginning, because you need a separate hub for fan and ARGB, because both connections unfortunately cannot be cascaded (“daisy chain”). We have already asked Sharkoon about this and they promised to include this kind of simplified functionality later on.

The new fan is at least exactly within the norm with its 25 mm thickness, which of course makes it more comparable in the end, especially since the rest of the design also tends to follow current trends and does not reveal any daring design stunts at first glance. On the contrary, everything looks as expected and accustomed.

Included is the fan along with screws and four interchangeable corners, which I’ll get to in a moment. The connection is made as usual via a 4-pin PWM connector and the normal digital 5V RGB connector. So please don’t force the 12V RGB of older motherboards, it will definitely go wrong. The cable herding of the two ribbon cables is also solved analogously to most other fans and thus doesn’t pose an obstacle.

One relies on a hydrodynamic plain bearing that seems quite usable. More is not possible at this price and we have seen worse for more money. The measurements will show later that the bearing can keep up.

The rotor as a counterpart to the black stator is a translucent block with a total of nine rotor blades, as well as slightly beveled edges and corners. The translucent fan blades and the RGB spacing in the hub with a total of 9 addressable LEDs as well as the omission of an RGB outer ring preserve the original rotor diameter, which should naturally also benefit the performance. Everything is supported by a black, plain frame that does not hide any secrets visually at first glance. The PWM-controlled fan manages a measured speed range of about 500 to up to 1400 rpm and does without a fan stop. Thus, the fan does not go off during PWM control, but this does not bother due to the only minimal noise.

The decoupling with the laterally inserted rubber corners is well solved, since it does not twist with the screw tightened and these corners can also be varied in color. By the way, the gap dimensions and surface finish are good. The power consumption is pleasantly low at full speed with 2.16 watts for the fan (without ARGB). But I’ll get to all the details in a moment, because especially PWM-controlled these fans are better than you would expect from the price

Form factor 120 mm
Strength 25 mm
PWM Yes
RGB ARGB (hub)
Decoupled Yes
Color Frame Black
Accent color White
Color rotor Translucent
Weight in g 150
min. speed 400 rpm (measured >= 500 rpm PWM and DC)
max. speed 1400 rpm
Volume flow m3/h 93.6
Flow rate CFM 55.09
static pressure mmH2O 1.9
Sound pressure dBA 20.4 dBA
Life Time hrs 50.000

On the next page you will first see how and what we test and why. Understanding the details is incredibly important in order to be able to objectively classify the results later. The differences between many models are more in the details and the best fan for all situations can hardly exist. There is a certain optimum in every situation and, of course, good all-rounders. But they usually have their price. However, if you are planning very specifically with 60 mm radiators, for example, you might be able to save money by choosing the best model for your intended use, which might not perform so well as a case fan. And vice versa, of course.

SilentStorm_120_PWM_prem_de_01

 

 

 

Lade neue Kommentare

RX480

Urgestein

883 Kommentare 472 Likes

NICE
Man sieht, das doch entspr. der Flügelform ein Unterschied zw. F- und P-Modellen bei niedrigen Drehzahlen auf Radis vorhanden ist.
(da werden wohl die ollen Arctic P12 im 5er Pack weiterhin als Push ne gute Wahl sein, gerade für HPE, die Auroras kann man ja auf der Innenseite als zusätzliche Pull weiter nutzen)

Antwort Gefällt mir

RedF

Urgestein

2,519 Kommentare 1,097 Likes

Die muss man sich echt merken.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

Format©

6,669 Kommentare 10,868 Likes

Die Werte sind für diesen Preis einfach top :)

Antwort 1 Like

T
Thorsten Heldt

Neuling

3 Kommentare 0 Likes

Danke für den Test der schnellen Umsetzung. Schade das der 140er nicht parallel dabei war. Aber ich denke er wird sich vergleichbar verhalten.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Pascal Mouchel

Moderator

458 Kommentare 490 Likes

In Kürze ich muss etwas nachholen und paar Lüfter Testen. Aber wird sicherlich auch noch die Tage gemessen.

Edit: ich bin gespannt auf die 140er in der Vergangenheit haben immer die 140er etwas zu Humming geneigt daher wird es wirklich interessant was die so veranstalten in der Messbox

Antwort 2 Likes

RAZORLIGHT

Veteran

241 Kommentare 136 Likes

Echt klasse Lüfter mit Nachteilen die nicht hätten sein müssen... sowas ärgert mich persönlich immer sehr.
Warum man kein Daisy Chain bzgl. der Anschlüsse realisiert hat ist mir ein Rätsel... das schreit jetzt schon nach einer neuen Revision.

ps. endlich wieder ein Lüfter Test (y)

Antwort 1 Like

C
Caposo

Mitglied

52 Kommentare 5 Likes

Danke wieder mal für so einen ausführlichen Test!
Was ich an der Testmethodik aber immer noch seltsam finde ist der Teil mit dem statischen Druck: Ohne Luftstrom sollte es egal sein, ob noch ein Radiator vor dem Lüfter ist oder wie dick dieser ist. Der statische Druck sollte immer der gleiche sein, da ohne Durchfluss auch der Druck vor und hinter dem Radiator gleich ist. Dass ihr da unterschiedliche Werte messt, liegt wohl eher daran, dass der Aufbau mitsamt Radiator eben nicht mehr 100% dicht ist.
Oder übersehe ich da etwas?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Pascal Mouchel

Moderator

458 Kommentare 490 Likes

Nein dadurch daß der Radiator da Sitz gibt es einen gegenstau somit eine Verlustleistung gegen die der Lüfter ankämpft. Daher wird die Messung ja hinter dem Radiator gemacht um zu sehen was da hinten noch rauskommt.

Die Kammer muss dazu nicht Dicht sein. Der Druck wird in einem Extra berechnetem Trichter zum Differenzdruck Messer geleitet die Messungen sind auch immer reproduzierbar.

Antwort 1 Like

M
Martin Gut

Urgestein

5,318 Kommentare 2,052 Likes

Bei dem Test misst man so zu sagen in einem beidseitig offenen Rohr. In der Mitte ist der Lüfter und der entsprechende Radiator verbaut. Der Lüfter bläst Luft aus dem ersten Teil des Rohres durch den Radiator in den 2. Teil des Rohres. Die Luft kann sich von da im Raum verteilen, geht aussen rum und wird wieder in das Rohr eingesaugt. Man misst den Druckunterschied vom Anfang des Rohres zum Auslass des Rohres. Es ist somit kein Druckunterschied in stehender Luft sondern in der bewegten Luft, so wie sie sich normal durch das Gehäuse bewegen würde.

Antwort 4 Likes

Ion_Tichy

Mitglied

29 Kommentare 10 Likes

Wer nicht viel Geld ausgeben will, sollte sich mal das Speedlink Myx LED Fan Kit mal Ansehen. Optisch finde ich die schöner, da sich die LEDs im Ramen, und nicht in der Nabe befinden. Nachteilig ist, daß sich die Lüfter nicht über das Mainboard steuern lassen und bei Neustart immer mit der höchsten Drehzahl starten.
In der niedrigsten Stufe kommt immer noch ordentlich Wind um meinen Spiele PC kühl zu halten. Für Radiatoren wohl eher nicht geeignet.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Pascal Mouchel

Moderator

458 Kommentare 490 Likes
C
Caposo

Mitglied

52 Kommentare 5 Likes

Danke für die gut verständliche Erklärung!
Was sagt dieser Messwert denn dann aus? Bzw. warum reicht die Messung des Volumenstroms nicht aus?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Pascal Mouchel

Moderator

458 Kommentare 490 Likes

Volumenstrom ist nicht alles ein Lüfter kann 200m3/h fördern von A nach B ohne Probleme sobald aber ein Hindernis dazwischen ist wie z.b unsere Radiatoren braucht es noch Druck und da ist der Knackpunkt. In unseren ganzen Tests mit Lüftern sieht man ja schön das es Lüfter gibt die locker durch Radiatoren Luft drücken oder eben nicht.

Daher ist Druck für Radiatoren sehr wichtig jeh mehr der Lüfter da Luft durchjagt umso besser ist der Lüfter dann auch geeignet für Radiatoren. Als reiner Gehäuselüfter ist Druck nicht so wichtig daher gibt es F Flow und P Pressure Lüfter oder welche die denn Spagat versuchen was aber meist nie so ganz klappt.

Daher machen wir die Druck Messungen um klar zu zeigen ok Lüfter X Taugt was auf einem Radiator bis Dicke 45mm für 60 reicht es nicht mehr aus. Slim Radiatoren gehen eigentlich immer selbst billigste Lüfter der Schwerpunkt liegt aber bei 45 und 60mm Radiatoren daaaaa gibt es klare unterschiede.

Du siehst ja auch das sich jeh nach Radiator dicke die Verlustleistung steigt. Kurz gesagt man braucht immer ein Gegenspieler Volumenstrom braucht Druck um effizient auf einem Radiator zu arbeiten. Nur Flow reicht nicht als Messung um eine Aussage zu treffen über die Qualität eines Lüfters bzw. die Nutzbarkeit

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
M
Martin Gut

Urgestein

5,318 Kommentare 2,052 Likes

Recht wenig. Ein Lüfter mit hohem Druck hat eher die Fähigkeit auch mit einem dicken Radiator noch gute Leistung zu bringen als einer mit wenig Druck. Da man daraus aber nicht direkt ableiten kann, wie gut der Lüfter sich dann konkret schlägt, bringt die Messung der Fördermengen mit den verschiedenen Radiatoren (wie es Pascal misst) deutlich mehr.

Da der Messwert von den Herstellern angegeben wird, ist auch etwas, was man vergleichen kann. Dazu kann Pascal hier auch nachprüfen, ob die technischen Daten der Hersteller ungefähr stimmen oder ob man aus Werbezwecken getrickst hat. Man muss dabei aber auch immer sehen, dass die Hersteller nicht immer unter den selben Bedingungen messen und darum die Werte abweichen können.

Die technischen Daten sind leider nicht immer sinnvolle Angaben zur Beurteilung eines Produkts. Man gibt gerne einfach alles an, was man so messen kann. Dann kann sich jeder die Daten anschauen, die er wichtig findet. Dass etwas angegeben wird, heisst nicht, dass diese Information auch wichtig ist oder einem eine sinnvolle Einschätzung ermöglicht. Je nach Anwendung kann etwas wichtig sein, oder auch nicht. Die Hersteller versuchen nicht, heraus zu finden, wem was wichtig ist. Man liefert einfach die Daten, die man hat. Dann kann sich jeder heraus suchen, was er will.

Antwort 1 Like

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Pascal Mouchel

Moderator

458 Kommentare 490 Likes

Hatten ja schon genug Lüfter mit geschönten Daten.
Und was die Hersteller so angeben muss ja an sich nicht falsch sein, weißt ja selbst als Hersteller muss man genormte Tests verwenden.

Daher glaub ich einfach das so Radiatoren Tests bei denen gar nicht erst vorkommt. Die spannen das in ihren Kanal und dann gehts los.

Unsere Tests sind ja Praxis bezogen.
Was Flow betrifft gibt es kaum geschönte Angaben meistens aber beim Druck. Naja lässt sich eben besser verkaufen wenn man sagt uiii die Lüfter eignen sich super auf einem Radiator.

Die die sich einen Custom Loop anschaffen lassen auch mehr Geld liegen und daher kann man die Zielgruppe gerne mehr schröpfen. (Vielleicht Denkweise)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek, Pascal Mouchel

Advertising

Advertising