CPU Latest news

Intel plays with the name and the data: The “Intel Baseline Profile” becomes “Intel Default Settings”

The problem with the Intel desktop processors of the 13th and 14th generation, i.e. Raptor Lake-S and Raptor Lake-S-Refresh, is not getting any smaller and the bad news does not stop. At this point, one could almost believe that Intel has simply left the whole thing to the motherboard manufacturers and is hoping to divert attention away from its own problem and somehow muddle through. The current twist with the binding profiles is actually a bit irritating for motherboard manufacturers, but in the end it certainly amounts to a pure name game. Here I am referring to the report from Benchlife and also my own source, which was able to confirm this publication in large parts. Since Benchlife was the first to report on this, thanks are due to this site and I’ll follow suit.

Despite the confirmation from several sources, please take the following with a grain of salt, as it has not yet been published by Intel itself. In the meantime, however, Intel has probably already published a kind of hard deadline for the motherboard manufacturers, which narrows down the period to the end of May:

Intel® requests system and motherboard manufacturers to provide end users with a default BIOS profile that matches Intel®
recommended settings.
– Suggested profile name “Intel Default Settings”.
Intel requests customers to implement the “Intel Default Settings” profile as the BIOS default profile by May 31, 2024.

 

Intel only plays with the PL

The Intel default settings (BIOS Defaults) are therefore currently expected to be implemented by board manufacturers by May 31, 2024. In the current situation, however, the actual approach of the Intel Baseline Profile is merely to lower the PL values. The PL2 value of the Intel Core i9-14900K of 253 W enables the execution of Turbo Boost with 6.0 GHz, but after applying the Intel Baseline Profile, the PL2 value of the Intel Core i9-14900K is set back to the known 188 W as default, regardless of which Intel Core i9-14900K and which Intel Z690 or Z790 chip motherboard is used.

It is also funny that in Intel’s proposal, as in the press kit at the launch of the 13th generation, there is the famous line that recommends setting the PL1 to 253W for the best performance behavior. So PL1 = PL2 = 253W. The Intel Baseline Profile, which is now specified as the default, is intended to limit these settings completely, so that the user then has to take manual action. The PBP (Processor Base Power) remains at 125W and untouched, nothing has been changed here.

In most cases, the power settings for the maximum values of Iccmax and Iccmax.app were previously 307A and 245A, in addition to the PL2 of 253W for the Intel Core i9-14900K, but after the application of the Intel Baseline Profile and the new BIOS defaults, the maximum values will probably be lowered to 249A and 200A by default, which is a fairly significant limitation that should significantly limit the overall performance of the Intel Core i9-14900K processor as long as you use the BIOS default settings (BIOS defaults).

The PL4 drops from the currently reported 420 watts to a maximum of 380 watts in the Performance or Extreme Profile, but is still above the 314 watts that were once used internally before the launch, but were never applied in this way. According to Benchlife, the data in the following table is considered to be set:

Intel Core i9-14900K Baseline (“Default”)
Performance Extreme
Processor Base Power 125W 125W 125W
Iccmax 249A 307A 400A
Iccmax.app 200A 245A 320A
PL1 125W 125W 253W
PL2 188W 253W 253W
PL4 293W 380W 380W
iPL2 160A 200A 200A

Where is the ACDC load line?

In the currently planned implementation, the so-called ACDC load line (sometimes also referred to as AC/DC load line) remains unclear for the time being. In Intel processors, however, this is a very important setting that influences both stability and power consumption and plays a major role in the voltage regulation of the processor, especially in connection with the power supply and power consumption under load. This setting is mainly used in BIOS or UEFI settings of Intel boards and it helps to regulate the voltage supplied to the processor when it is working under load. It influences how much the voltage drops when the load increases (voltage droop). This is important to ensure the stability and performance of the processor and to prevent excessive voltages from damaging the processor. Here again as a reminder:

  • AC Loadline
    Affects the adjustment of the voltage based on the CPU load in a scenario where the processor is powered by the main power supply (AC). It helps to increase the voltage when the CPU load increases to compensate for the voltage drop.
  • DC Loadline
    This setting is similar, but refers to the power supply coming from the DC source (usually the motherboard’s voltage regulator). It controls how the voltage adjusts as the load varies to optimize efficiency and stability under different operating conditions.

These settings are particularly important for overclockers who want to get the maximum performance out of their system without compromising the hardware. They allow finer control over the processor’s behavior under different load conditions, which can lead to better performance stability and potentially higher overclocking results. So it will be our job to find out exactly. If Intel changes or prescribes anything at all. However, this will only work once we have received the appropriate firmware. So far, however, this information is not available or could not be validated from at least two sources.

What does this mean for users?

AMD is certainly rubbing its hands in glee. Socket LGA1700 motherboards are available as high-end, mid-range and entry-level models, which differ greatly from one another, including of course in terms of price. However, the expensive boards from the upper mid-range upwards in particular sometimes use extreme designs for the voltage converters of the power supply and therefore naturally also define the price. In some cases, the possible performance values are extremely higher than Intel’s specifications, which were previously regarded as a guideline rather than a binding requirement. However, this is now to become virtually obsolete, at least in part. Let’s politely call it expropriation of OC enthusiasts.

The Intel Baseline Profile for the 13th and 14th processors de facto puts the K-series on the same level as the non-K-series and the motherboards of all levels are also practically put on the same level, because these extreme performance data are then simply no longer required. After all, in addition to Performance and Baseline, there is also the Extreme Profile. In the Extreme Profile, there is still the familiar setting with PL1 = PL2 = 253W, which at least saves the K series a little bit of the edge and should safeguard the sense of the expensive motherboards. However, even a rather mid-priced motherboard such as an MSI Z690 Mortar can achieve this, which makes all significantly more expensive models from all manufacturers seem somewhat absurd, should these strict specifications really apply.

What else do we know? Iccmax and Iccmax.app are at least still set at 400A and 320A in the Extreme Profile. After applying the Intel Baseline Profile, however, the time in which Intel Thermal Velocity Boost can reach 6 GHz on the Intel Core i9-14900K, for example, drops to less than 3 seconds. This means that the Turbo Boost of the Intel Core i9-14900K is ultimately just a kind of gimmick, useless in practice and just something for marketing. For all those manufacturers who sell their high-flyer boards at a high price, the question of meaningfulness will naturally arise, as the boards that are far above the specifications will be severely slowed down by the limit. Unless, of course, the customer manually adds more at his own risk.

Intel had promised an official announcement by the end of May at the latest and we will then see what the processor manufacturer has to tell us officially. For many extreme users, this will certainly not be a fun day if they (have to) submit to the new specs with a BIOS update (downgrade). If they don’t, there is still the risk of a total loss. Not really nice either.

Source Benchlife, own

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

C
ChaosKopp

Urgestein

565 Kommentare 588 Likes

"Flieg nicht so hoch, mein kleiner Freund..." oder "Ikarus lässt grüßen".

Darf Intel eigentlich die Eigenschaften eines verkauften Produktes nachträglich ändern?

Antwort Gefällt mir

T
Tarkin77

Mitglied

19 Kommentare 6 Likes

Auch eine Möglichkeit, ARL besser aussehen zu lassen vs 14th/13th gen :ROFLMAO:

Antwort Gefällt mir

Asghan

Mitglied

20 Kommentare 13 Likes

Intel ändert ja nichts. Sie erzwingen nun nur die "Default Specs" mit etwas mehr Nachdruck.

Antwort Gefällt mir

ipat66

Urgestein

1,372 Kommentare 1,372 Likes

Da tun mir die Enthusiasten-Käufer richtig leid...
Da kauft man sich den schönen Prozessor mitsamt passendem Unterbau und darf dann die
versprochene Leistung nicht abrufen :(

Den Käufern sollte Intel gegen einsenden der Prozessor/Motherboard Kombi einen entsprechenden Gutschein anbieten....
Das wäre zumindest ein „ehrenhaftes“Verhalten...

Aber was schwafel ich da ?

Antwort Gefällt mir

C
ChaosKopp

Urgestein

565 Kommentare 588 Likes

Mal sehen, ob diese Rechtsauffassung sich durchsetzt, insbesondere in den USA.

Das Forcieren der Specs ist eine Änderung. Der Kunde erhält nun nicht die Performance, die in Tests erzielt wurde.

Antwort Gefällt mir

LurkingInShadows

Urgestein

1,372 Kommentare 572 Likes

@ChaosKopp Produktrückrufe zur Nachbesserung kennst schon? Hier muss man halt nichtmal vom Schreibtisch weg.

Antwort Gefällt mir

big-maec

Urgestein

869 Kommentare 509 Likes

Eigentlich ändert sich nicht viel, das Ganze wird auf moderat gestellt und jedem selber überlassen, ob er dann das stabile System nutzen möchte. Andersherum gesagt, man fängt von hinten an, damit man vorne nichts ändern muss, verrückt, aber es ist so wie immer.

Antwort 1 Like

B
Beschi

Mitglied

33 Kommentare 6 Likes

Moin,
Im Umkehrschluss wird die Verantwortung von eventuellen Schäden an der CPU von Intel über die Mainboard-Hersteller hin zum Kunden verschoben. Nachträglich dürfte es schwierig werden im RMA-Prozess nachzuweisen wann die CPU geschädigt wurde und wer für den Schaden aufkommen muss.
So etwas kann passieren, wenn man volles Risiko geht um gegen die Konkurrenz im Rennen zu bleiben. Leider ist halt immer der Kunde der Dumme.
Ich wünsche Allen einen ruhigen Montag. Gruß Beschi

Antwort 1 Like

echolot

Urgestein

998 Kommentare 761 Likes

Dann doch besser AMD...Puh....Glück gehabt. Mal ehrlich. Ist man von Intel jetzt nicht so gewohnt.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Lieblingsbesuch

Veteran

451 Kommentare 80 Likes

Was machen jetzt die KS Besitzer?
Bekommen die das Intel Extreme Delivery Profil zur Auswahl im Bios?

Antwort Gefällt mir

P
Pizza!

Mitglied

11 Kommentare 4 Likes

Warum den Artikel nicht richtig gelesen und dann so etwas falsches behaupten?

Du darfst alles machen was du willst. Es geht lediglich um den ersten Start wo das Default Profil geladen sein muss. Damit die CPU fürs Erste Standard läuft und bei unwissenden Usern nicht spontan 400 Watt verbrät.

Hinterher kannst du einstellen worauf du Bock hast, nur dass dein OC dir halt nix garantiert bzw. du genau wissen solltest was du da anstellst.

Sowas hätte schon längst passieren müssen. Spätestens zum Start der 13. Generation. Aber dann hätte man in den ganzen Tests nicht so gut ausgesehen.

Antwort 3 Likes

Lieblingsbesuch

Veteran

451 Kommentare 80 Likes

Warum?
Es wurde noch nach Intel Vorgaben getestet.

Antwort Gefällt mir

P
Pizza!

Mitglied

11 Kommentare 4 Likes

Wenn du die Standards von jetzt (also die kommenden) damals schon gehabt hättest, dann wären viele Benchmarkbalken deutlich kürzer geworden

Antwort Gefällt mir

Lieblingsbesuch

Veteran

451 Kommentare 80 Likes

Von 420 auf 380Watt wird nicht viel ändern.

Antwort Gefällt mir

P
Pizza!

Mitglied

11 Kommentare 4 Likes

Hä? Es geht um das Default Profil.
Da ist nix mit 380 Watt.
Da ein 14900K nicht nur von den Watt sondern auch bei ICCMax usw. stark eingeschränkt wird.
Testseiten testen erstmal Standardwerte und da würde ein 14900K mit nur 188 Watt in den Benchmarks massiv an Punkte verlieren.
Im Gaming wäre der Unterschied wahrscheinlich gering.

Antwort Gefällt mir

K
Knoxxi

Neuling

5 Kommentare 0 Likes

Vermutlich ja, da vermutlich immer mit "up to" geworben wird.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Lieblingsbesuch

Veteran

451 Kommentare 80 Likes

Intel wird nicht so dumm sein und beim Default Profil nicht zwischen den CPUs unterschiedlichen CPUs unterscheiden, so wird für einen KS das Default entsprechend ausfallen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Inxession

Mitglied

53 Kommentare 43 Likes

Genau das.

Und das ist im Prinzip im Nachhinein eine bodenlose Frechheit.

Krass was Intel macht, um den längsten zu haben.

Bin auf aktualisierte Benchmarks gespannt.

Antwort Gefällt mir

P
Pokerclock

Veteran

460 Kommentare 382 Likes

Die Gaming-Fraktion dürfte davon leistungsmäßig nur wenig mitbekommen in diesem typischen Teillastbereich. Aber wer die 1700er-CPUs komplett auslasten möchte, wird jetzt vor einem Dilemma stehen. Ich habe die i9-1700er CPUs schon seit jeher auf 253 Watt begrenzt im PL1/PL2 und die iCCmax auf 307 A. Das war schon im Cinebench mal eben eine kleine Welt, die da plötzlich gefehlt hat. Das dürfte dann bei realen Auslastungsszenarien kaum anders sein. Und wenn es nur das berüchtigte Shader-Kompilieren ist. Und jetzt noch einmal weniger? Na danke auch. Gut, dass die bald EOL gehen und sich kaum mehr einer für die Benchmarkbalken zum Marktstart interessieren wird.

Es war schon lange ein Unding, dass jede Intel-CPU/Mainboard-Kombination ihre eigenen Standard-Settings hatte und absolut nichts einheitlich und damit nicht nachvollziehbar war. Bei AMD war das wenigstens größtenteils gegeben. Nicht immer (Stichwort Asrock-Temp.-Limit @80°C), aber doch halbwegs verlässlich.

Jetzt, nach all diesen Update, dürfte ein 7950X die ganzen i9 im Vollastbereich ja mal sowas von verblasen.

Was nutzen die i9er dann noch? Min-fps-Fanatiker und Games, die Takt habe wollen. Evtl. ein paar Intel-Features. Aber sonst? Selbst die Heizungsfunktion im Winter fällt ja nun weg...

Antwort 1 Like

Klicke zum Ausklappem

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung