Network Reviews Web

HPE Instant On (not only) for small business: Aruba Access Point AP22 with Wi-Fi 6 and 1930 8G Class4 PoE 2SFP Switch Review

I admit it, I’ve been putting off the topic of Wi-Fi 6 for ages. But in the meantime, in addition to the appropriate smartphones, I also own several clients that can use Wi-Fi 6, but are not allowed to, because my good old Fritz!Box 7590 does not allow this. And I have long considered whether I do not separate once between business and private, although this is not so easy in my case also spatially with the now 2 floors in a normal apartment building. Of course, the whole thing is also a question of cost, and in the end there was also the desire to finally install various devices cable-connected with PoE even without a power supply, which my insurance company recommends to me for security reasons. Two separate WLAN accesses, each with its own SSID? Yes, that makes perfect sense, because then I can use the guest network of the Fritz!Box 7590 off. I also have to offer this for many reasons. So the number of visible networks does not increase in the end either.

What you need for such a move? A PoE-capable switch that is connected directly to (and right next to) the router, a usable access point, and a suitable mesh repeater that I can set up here and there before I get annoyed and buy a third one. Wi-Fi 6E would certainly also be an option, but even the normal 5 GHz band is already as empty as a large cave here, while traffic piles up en masse on 2.4 GHz. You don’t need the (still) almost unused, new frequency band for the time being, because almost all of these devices with the E behind the 6 have to be weighed out with gold, if you are not an influencing technology worshipper. Then the Wi-Fi 6 without E is better, and it is cheap. And something like a simple, small command center in the form of an app (or web interface) for the new, competing network wouldn’t be bad in the end, somehow.

Unadorned image of the current command center with AP22 and switch

Next-generation Wi-Fi 6 devices have been on the market for some time, but only recently have access points (APs) become available at prices that make sense for small businesses or semi-privates like me. Aruba’s entry into the low-price sector is the AP22, which offers a complete package of 802.11ax services starting at around 122 euros. If you still need a power supply unit, you can either buy it for about 140 Euros or stay stingy. Because if there is already a suitable switch next to it, the power supply can easily be provided via the Ethernet cable.

By the way, does anyone know Aruba? Okay, the name sounds a bit like a Dongguan or Shenzhen startup, but it’s actually HPE, or Hewlett Packard Enterprise. These are actually the ones with the parts for the companies in the commercial sector. In the end, it was certainly obvious to simply slim down the existing technology a bit and additionally run a consumer line. Every little bit helps, and the customer also gets quite sophisticated technology at a reasonable price. Win-Win. Because despite the slight lean, you get all the management and connectivity options you need. Well, almost.

HPE Instant On Aruba Access Point AP 22 & App

The AP22 is part of Aruba’s Instant On family (as is the AP12, for example) , it supports Aruba’s Smart Mesh technology and can be managed either via the web portal or the free mobile app. So far, so smart. I can tick off the app, check. Technically, the AP22 is a 2×2 MU-MIMO AP that offers speeds of up to 1,200 Mbps in the 5 GHz band and 574 Mbps in the 2.4 GHz range. Theoretically, this does look like a disadvantage compared to the AP12, which has 3×3 MU-MIMO and a 5 GHz data rate of 1,300 Mbits/sec. but this model is unfortunately only suitable for Wi-Fi 5, which destroys the advantage again.

The AP22 is a true one-pounder, so with a weight of only 500 g it is a real lightweight and can really be mounted on the wall or even the ceiling without any problems (the higher in the room, the better). You get (see picture) besides the AP an Ethernet cable, the universal mount made of plastic and in my case a power supply that I don’t even need by now because the switch has taken over the feeding. There is nothing more to unpack and you wouldn’t need anything else.

You can connect almost nothing, except for the Gigabit Ethernet port, which can use either a PoE or PoE+ power source, such as the switch that is also installed. Optionally, there is also a socket for the power supply and that’s it. Incidentally, the Ethernet port is purely an input to connect the AP to the network. If it is used as a pure repeater in another room, then it is not possible to connect a switch and thus purely wired clients from there. A kind of bridge mode is thus not possible, which is a bit of a shame. But for something like this, there are (already existing) third-party accessories, e.g. a Fritz!Repeater that could also be switched to the new network. Aruba relies on a current Qualcomm chipset, so communication actually runs smoothly with many other competitors’ devices as well.

 

The setup via the app is quite simple and almost intuitive, for the rest there are various instructions, also on the Internet. But what is important if you ever make a mistake is that there is a paperclip-compatible reset button on the back behind a usual tiny opening. Disconnect the power plug, press for 5 seconds and then release and restart. Unfortunately, the latter takes forever each time, at least 5 minutes, depending. From my point of view, this is the biggest annoyance, as it really takes what feels like eternities once the power has gone.

Wi-Fi fodder: A total of 8 clients (including smartphone) including 3D scanner in just one room?  Actually also goes wireless

The account constraint is certainly not everyone’s cup of tea, but since no further data is requested, you can live with it to some extent.  I have limited the screenshots to the initial test with the two APs as an example, because the current configuration is nobody’s business. By the way, the web interface offers a bit more than the iOS app, so I usually use the browser on the PC to look things up and configure them if necessary. After all, the important thing is that everything runs.

And because you’re used to it and I don’t want to repeat all the features up to WPA3, here’s the data sheet:

instant-on-ap22-wifi-6

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

F
Freelancera1

Mitglied

59 Kommentare 16 Likes

Ich habe letzte Woche auch meine alten TP-Link C7 Router in Rente geschickt. Je Stockwerk war je ein Router zuständig für das W-Lan, jeder per Ethernet angeschlossen. Habe mir jetzt 3 Deco x50 geholt welche Meshfähig mit Wi-Fi6 sind und die Daten dabei aber über das LAN übertragen bzw. auch Daten untereinander über das LAN austauschen. Eingang über Glasfasermodem, dann an die Fritzbox, danach wird alles über ein JGS524Ev2 von Netgear verteilt.
So kann jedes Gerät möglichst immer im 5GHz-WLAN bleiben und die 250/50Mbit auch stabil ausreizen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

pantsuki

Mitglied

35 Kommentare 5 Likes

Account zwang... absolut nicht meins. Selbst wenn keine Daten fließen...

Antwort 1 Like

TSH-Lightning

Mitglied

71 Kommentare 37 Likes

Ein schöner Erfahrungsbericht bzw. Test aus der Praxis. Gut zu sehen was da für relativ kleines Geld möglich ist. Was mich interessiert, wäre wie sich die Gerätschaft über einen längeren Zeitraum schlägt; ob Störungen auftreten und ob die einfach zu beheben sind.

Ich verfolge die Strategie: alles was stationär ist hängt an LAN, dass an 4 Standorte im EFH verteilt sind. Shield TV, Konsolen, Fire TVs, Thinkpad-Dock, PC, Drucker, Smart-TVs hängen alle am LAN. Nur für mobile Geräte wie Laptop, Smartphone und Tablets ist das WLAN da. Das spannt zentral im Treppenhaus eine uralt 7490 (mehr als VDSL50 geht hier eh nicht) auf, der Garten und EG/UG wird über einen AVM Repeater 2400 (hängt am LAN) versorgt. Ist für mich ausreichend.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,153 Kommentare 18,721 Likes

Ich betreibe das jetzt schon fast 2 Monate so (richtig intensiv) und hatte bisher null Probleme damit. Ok, zweimal war der Strom weg (selbst schuld, Sicherung) und das Hochfahren ist jedesmal ausreichend für eine kurze Kaffeepause, aber sonst war nichts bisher. Das passt eigentlich. Wi-Fi 6 ist echt ein Zugewinn. Der Switch ist gut, spart einige Netzteile :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,153 Kommentare 18,721 Likes

Ich sehe das ja ähnlich, nur hat hier einfach die Bequemlichkeit gesiegt. Bleibt natürlich die Frage, was passiert, wenn deren Server mal abgeschaltet werden. Der Switch geht auch ohne genauso gut, da muss man nichts befürchten. Nur die APs sind ohne App und Zugang quasi tot. Genau deshalb kaufe ich, wenn Account nötig, lieber Sachen von Firmen, die es schon länger gibt (und hoffentlich auch noch geben wird). Bei HPE habe ich da eher weniger Bauchschmerzen. :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

u
u78g

Mitglied

70 Kommentare 14 Likes

schöner Artikel,gefällt mir (y)

ich wollte noch informativ erwähnen das der AP 22 auch in unserer Firma für Endkunden verwendet wird. Das sind mehrere tausend Geräte pro Jahr. Ich glaube mich zu erinnern das die AP22 die wir verwenden eine andere Firmware verwenden....ohne Account.

Vielleicht kann der Igor mal die Firmwareversion auslesen.....und wenn ich das nächste mal einen bei uns hier in die Hände bekomme, können wir dann vergleichen. :)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,153 Kommentare 18,721 Likes

2.5.0 :)

Interessant, dass die Teile doch so verbreitet sind. Ich dachte schon, ich hab mal wieder was zu Unrecht Unterbewertetes gefunden, so wie die Kopfhörer morgen in Test. Da gibts Schäppchen-Alarm für Geizige :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

FfFCMAD

Urgestein

667 Kommentare 172 Likes

Wenns nur auf den Switch und POE ankommt, dann kann ich auch noch den HPE OfficeConnect 1820 empfehlen. Der ist "guenstig", klein und bringt auch ordentliche Unterstuetzung fuer POE fuer 4 der 8 Ports mit. Weitere Features wie die WiFi-Verwaltung sind da nicht bei, die braucht man da ja eigentlich auch nicht. (Die APs koennen ja untereinander quatschen.)
Der groeßte Unterschied zwischen dem 1930 und dem 1820 durfte sein, das der 1820 sein Netzteil extern hat und somit im Gehaeuse weniger Abwaerme entsteht. Der Aruba ist jedoch so gebaut, das die Abwaerme ebenfalls gut abgefuehrt werden kann.

Antwort Gefällt mir

FfFCMAD

Urgestein

667 Kommentare 172 Likes

In unserer Firma verwenden wir seit Ende 2017 aeltere APs von Aruba. Laufen wie der Teufel

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,153 Kommentare 18,721 Likes

Immerhin gut zu lesen, dass wir uns mal einig sind :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

B
Besterino

Urgestein

6,701 Kommentare 3,300 Likes

Echt schade, dass die APs offenbar nicht auch ohne App funzen (so wie die Switches, die eben ganz ohne Online-Gebimmse funktionieren).

Ich bin bei APs vor einigen Jahren bei Ubiquity gelandet. Funzen, ordentlich Durchsatz. So richtig cool finde ich die Konfiguration da aber auch nicht gelöst.

Antwort Gefällt mir

A
Art

Mitglied

47 Kommentare 8 Likes

"Smart Mesh-Technologie von Aruba" -> auf proprietären Kram (ob mit oder ohne Accountzwang) habe ich keinen Bock

Zugegebenerweise ist das einizige Mesh was ich aktuell betreibe auch proprietär (2x Fritz! 7362SL im EFH meiner Mutter - LAN/WiFi, DECT + Fax - war mit 2x 22 € unschlagbar günstig), aber ansonsten würde ich mich mit OpenWRT auseinandersetzen, anstatt mir Einbahnstraßen mit Vendor Lock-in von Aruba, TP oder Netgear anzuschaffen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,153 Kommentare 18,721 Likes

Nur mal zur Erinnerung: Thema war WiFi 6 :)

Antwort Gefällt mir

B
Besterino

Urgestein

6,701 Kommentare 3,300 Likes

Naja, aber auch Aruba und bei dem Online-Gedöns scheiden sich ja schon die Geister. :)

Antwort Gefällt mir

g
gadgetfreak

Mitglied

33 Kommentare 12 Likes

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung