Cooling Reviews Watercooling

Aqua Computer high flow NEXT Review – Much more than just an accurate flow meter. Only it can’t speak yet.

With the Aqua Computer high flow NEXT, the Swiss Army Knife for custom loops with lots of functions and accuracy has been available since this year for just under 70 Euros.  Does anyone remember the test of all the flow meters and the grandiose failure of all the display toys that weren’t even good for an estimate? At the time, I was not only annoyed about the lack of quality, but almost branded it as a rip-off.

And now comes another part in color with display and RGB? Far from it, because the component tested today is good. Only I have to explain this in detail first, because it is well worth it.

With the high flow NEXT, Aqua Computer once again relies on the proven and somewhat cheaper turbine principle, but with 2 magnets and two appropriately selected Hall sensors. Together with the complex storage and a calibration ex works, the aim is to achieve an accuracy of +/- 2.5% over the entire measuring range from 40 to 1000 l/h. This works, as far as I can spoil it, already quite well (in places even much more accurate), but only if the positioning is really ideal. Installed horizontally and without directly screwed angle pieces in the flow, you can trust this part without repeating the suicidal helicopter flight of the test candidates under the living room sofa from 2020.

Reading tip: Barrowch FBFT03 vs. Thermaltake Pacific TF1 and Aqua Computer High Flow in test – flow sensors for custom loop water cooling with two total failures

Scope of delivery and functionality

Okay, let’s get to the scope of delivery. You get the flow sensor, a USB 2 connector cable for the internal hub on the motherboard, and a quick start guide of sorts. The rest should be downloaded from the homepage and printed out if necessary, because the range of functions is already considerable. There is nothing more visible on the outside, but the values are inside the high flow NEXT anyway.

Which brings us elegantly to what the part can do. And that is quite a lot. Of course, you can first measure the flow rate in l/h, which is the primary task par excellence. After all, that’s what the whole thing was bought for in the end. I had already said something about the turbine and the manufacturer has also immortalized the details on YouTube in a video. I don’t need to regurgitate all that here. It is also a fact that the initial production problem is well under control after a recall and the flow meter now acts absolutely inaudible.

It also measures temperatures accurately, which I was able to prove well with a counter test. This works even below 20 °C and more than 45 °C I could not measure anyway due to lack of intention (and possibilities). In this range the deviations are now below the tolerance range of my own equipment. So fits perfectly and it measures especially also very fast. You can read more about the data of this temperature sensor in the data sheet below. All that matters in the end is that it works accurately enough. But that’s exactly what it does.

Another gimmick, which is actually not a gimmick at all, is the evaluation of the electrical conductivity of the cooling liquid in µS/cm! Normal, pre-clarified tap water starts at approx. 200 to 300 µS/cm, which I have used here for a pictorial representation (water tap de luxe Chemnitz). For comparison, pure distilled water offers a conductivity of only 20 µS/cm, special demineralized (VE-water) even 10 µS/cm, both of which are of course much better suited for our purposes in the water cycle.

This is because conductivity is influenced by ionically dissolved substances (ions). Salts, acids and alkalis decompose into positively charged cations and negatively charged anions. For example, common salt (NaCl) decomposes in water to sodium ions (Na+) and chloride ions (Cl-). The so-called demineralized water has a particularly low conductivity, since approximately only every billionth water molecule (H2O) decomposes into the ions H+ and OH-. However, normal distilled water is also sufficient, especially as the conductivity also increases slightly on contact with air and through corrosion protection additives. Of course, you can overdo it.

Since not every user is a walking compendium who has the individual values in his head like a compendium, the water quality shows the evaluated variant analogously. In my tap water test, the absolute limit of shame is also reached here with 0%. This definitely needs to be replaced. From this point of view, the visual inventory of the current quality is good to identify dissolving components.

You can use the display as a nice exclusive display without further evaluation, because all data is shown here as well. Then all you have to do is connect it to the internal USB 2.0 port using the included USB cable (note the polarity!) and configure it using the push buttons on the top. If you want to be even more precise: There are also connections for the sensors and the Aqua-Bus on the back. With the Aqua Suite, the whole thing can also be elegantly controlled and even further configured, the license is included with the device. And RGB fetishists will rejoice: entire LED strips can be connected to the RGB output. If the motherboard can be switched to up to 2 amps at the hub (Power USB), then there go up to 10 watts as a light column.

So, that should be enough at this point, because I’m writing a test and not a manual or PR texts for marketing. At this point, I will therefore spare myself the manual creation of a table with copied manufacturer data and instead embed the document from Aqua Computer in the original:

53293 - high flow NEXT

 

And finally also the manual, so that one can already inform oneself before purchase whether it is really worthwhile for oneself including the expenditure. Whereby the price is already very tempting. Small tip: at the manufacturer it is currently still one of the cheapest.

high_flow_NEXT_de

 

Aqua Computer Durchflusssensor high flow NEXT (53293)

equipprAuf Lager, 1-3 Werktage Lieferzeit72,90 €*Stand: 21.06.21 15:40
*Alle Preise inkl. gesetzl. MwSt zzgl. Versandkosten und ggf. Nachnahmegebühren, wenn nicht anders beschriebenmit freundlicher Unterstützung von www.geizhals.de

Lade neue Kommentare

RedF

Urgestein

999 Kommentare 333 Likes

Das ding kommt auf meine "will ich haben" Liste.

Antwort Gefällt mir

³N1GM4

Mitglied

54 Kommentare 7 Likes

Wie sehr beinflusst es denn die Messgenauigkeit? Kannst du dazu noch ein Diagramm basteln?

Antwort Gefällt mir

big-maec

Veteran

170 Kommentare 88 Likes

Überlege Dir was du noch anschliessen möchtest und Bestell dir die nötigen Kabel gleich mit. Es gibt ja noch Kabel für diverse Möglichkeiten. Vor dem Kauf ins Handbuch schauen. Ansonsten bestellst du 2 mal, so wie ich.

Ich war Überrascht was alles in dem kleinen Gehäuse passt. Genial auch das ein Piezo-Piepser verbaut ist.

Aber Krach(Piezo) machen kann er schon.

Antwort Gefällt mir

RedF

Urgestein

999 Kommentare 333 Likes

Habe ja schon die Quadro. Stellt sich nur die frage ob ich das ding über Aquabus oder USB anschließe. Wenn das teil sowieso an den usb muss kann ich mir das Aquabus kabel warscheinlich sparen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

big-maec

Veteran

170 Kommentare 88 Likes

Hab nur den high flow NEXT im Rechner über USB und da wird er als Gerät erkannt. Müsste man mal schauen was alles über den Aquabus geht.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Opa-Chris

Mitglied

35 Kommentare 26 Likes

Danke für den super Test, @Igor Wallossek. Es ist doch immer schön, wenn ein Kauf im Nachhinein noch durch Tests bestätigt wird.

Der high flow Next hat mir gut gezeigt, dass meine Test-Erweiterung der Eisbär Aurora mit einem zusätzlichen Alphacool NexXxoS ST30 Full Copper X-Flow 360mm zwar noch gut funktioniert hat, der GPU-Block von Watercool dann aber doch zu viel war. Mit 23 l/h sammelt sich die Wärme dann schön im Wasser.....bei sommerlichen Temperaturen will ich das dann so nicht mehr ausprobieren.

Antwort Gefällt mir

DHAmoKK

Urgestein

1,500 Kommentare 449 Likes

Hmm... mal vormerken für das nächste Upgrade, aktuell habe ich ja den normalen high flow schon im Einsatz. Aber das mit der Wasserqualität interessiert mich.
Das einzige, was an AC nervt, ist die elendig Abhängigkeit der Firmware zur Software. Hat man zum konfigurieren mal das Farbwerk über USB dran, lädt die aktuellste Software, gibt es direkt ein Firmware Update, sonst geht's nicht. Hängt man das Teil später per aquabus dran und muss mal Windows neu installieren, funktioniert natürlich die ältere Software nicht mit der neusten Firmware, da ich die Aquaero schon länger besitze und die Lizenz nur bis 2019 geht. Da gibt es definitiv Verbesserungpotential.

Antwort 2 Likes

D
Dark-Noir

Neuling

7 Kommentare 2 Likes

Leider kann die AquaSuite immer noch nicht Mainboard Lüfter steuern und AquaComputer plannt auch nicht das zu implementieren (soweit ich weiß), da ich kein extra Fancontroller und noch mehr Kabel haben möchte, bleibe ich bei meinem billig China Durchflusssensor der einfach am Mainboard angeschlossen wird...

Antwort Gefällt mir

M
Martin Gut

Urgestein

3,103 Kommentare 1,030 Likes

Für einen Programmierer mit den nötigen Kenntnissen wäre das kein so grosser Aufwand. Als Hobbyprogrammierer und ohne Insiderinformationen habe ich eine Woche pröbeln müssen, um die Lüfter auf der Grundlage von Openhardwaremonitor selbst nach der Temperatur von CPU und GPU zu regeln. Aber um einen solchen Sensorwert direkt oder aus der Herstellersoftware aus zu lesen, fehlen einem natürlich die Informationen und der Quelltext.

Antwort Gefällt mir

D
Dark-Noir

Neuling

7 Kommentare 2 Likes

Gibt genug Software die das kann, immerhin bezahlt man die AquaSuite Software ja jährlich, also wenn neue Mainboards heraus kommen wo es anders funktioniert muss man halt eine neue Version kaufen, wäre ja ok. Aber garkein Support für Mainboard Lüfter etc. ist bei so einer Software einfach arm...

Antwort 1 Like

Danke für die Spende



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About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

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