Reviews SSD & HDD Storage drives

Patriot SUPERSONIC RAGE PRIME 1 TB Review – Small USB stick with SSD qualities in writing OR reading

Patriot has once again made it exciting and even issued an extra NDA for this SUPERSONIC RAGE PRIME 1TB USB 3.2 stick. I must also preface this by saying that I had to do this test without a communicated MSRP, which might put some things into perspective later on. But I was really fascinated by this stick in many parts of this test, because it offers more than just SATA performance for the pocket in the size of a rather small USB stick. Even with really large files and even after several full-fill actions, where I had completely filled the stick and then deleted it again.

But why does Patriot make it so mysterious this time? Unfortunately, nothing could be pulled out of the noses of the gentlemen, not even the data on the controller, which celebrated its mysterious appearance in the fully glued stick and is supposed to be “something from Phison” in the end. Be that as it may, it worked as advertised, otherwise today’s test would have had a different, rather catty introduction. Anyone who makes such big cheeks must also be able to deliver. That’s where there’s a lot of light, but also some shadow. But more on that later.

Actually, I wanted to compare the stick with an external NVMe-SSD (ADATA SE770G 1TB), but in the course of the tests I came to the conclusion that the purpose and characteristics of the two drives are not comparable. The new stick is almost perfect as a powerful data carrier for on the go, which can swallow larger data volumes in no time and also spit them out again quickly. The device can also handle long 4K streams without batting an eyelid and without stuttering. And you then not only reach the stated “up to 600 MB/s”, but can often exceed it very clearly, even with the stick already fully used and various write operations.

But – here comes the certain but – it’s not a real drive in the conventional sense, so no tricks and optimization of the firmware of the “Phison something” helps with the IOPS. While the two tested drives, the stick and the external SSD, were still very close to each other in the synthetic tests and even AJA as a streaming benchmark, the workstation test later separates them into two completely different categories. But I’ll get to that in detail and with lots of benchmarks later, because first we want to look at both the technical details and the usual benchmarks. At least here Patriot can score really well with the new stick.

Connectivity, power consumption and temperatures

In order to achieve the promised data rates, USB 3.2 is used as the interface, which is logical. This in turn only really works in all its glory if you use the USB-A port on the back of the motherboard, which is directly connected to the CPU. At least for most motherboards. Significantly lower values are measurable at normal USB 3.x or a split port. However, the low power consumption is astonishing. In idle it is just 50 to 100 mW, during reading and writing it is on average less than 500 mW. So with peaks below 1 watt, there won’t be any surprises thermally.

Apart from the fact that Patriot also writes about built-in temperature sensors in its documentation, the resulting typical power loss of far below one watt is never a reason for concern, especially since the stick only got hand-warm after one hour even in the workstation test. Plus point with distinction. The tested NVMe SSD from ADATA in the external case is a different caliber with almost 6 watts and in the stress test it is the perfect pants warmer for Siberian winter evenings.

The spec sheet also reads pretty tasty at first.

PEF1TBRPMW32U Sku Sheet_062121

 

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

P
Phelan

Veteran

190 Kommentare 172 Likes

ne NDA für ein Stick ... okay ... Ich hab schon überlegt welche GRafikkarte jetzt wieder neu rauskommt ;-)

Beeindruckend finde ich die kleine Stromaufnahme.
Mich nerft es seit Jahren das schneller USB3.0 Stick gerne mal 1-3 Watt haben.
Dauerhaft am Notebook angesteckt kostet ds echt viel Akkulaufzeit, so das ich da noch eine sparsamen aber auch lahmen Stick nutzen.

Leute die große Daten bewegen möchte und/oder einen wirklich schnellen Stick mit massig Speicher haben wollen, die wird auch der Preis nicht stören.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,157 Kommentare 18,727 Likes

Der ist im Idle mit 0.01 bis 0.02 Ampere wirklich kein Stromfreser. Beim Lesen wird fast mehr gelutscht als beim Schreiben.
Es gibt ja noch einen Test, aber da hat man offensichtlich am falschen Port getetstet ;)

Antwort 2 Likes

ArthurUnaBrau

Veteran

319 Kommentare 161 Likes

Gibt es einen technischen Grund für USB-A statt USB-C oder hat es nur mit Kompatibilität zu tun?

Antwort Gefällt mir

p
passivecool

Mitglied

53 Kommentare 28 Likes

Irgendwie war der Trailer doch spannender als der Hauptfilm. :LOL:
Wer als Patriot sein Sneakernet pflegt muss künftig nicht mehr wie ein gehetzter Gorilla laufen;
die vorab gesparten kostbaren Millisekunden sei Dank!

Antwort Gefällt mir

g
goch

Veteran

469 Kommentare 179 Likes

Ja, wenn der Stick noch USB-A und USB-C hätte (hybrid), wäre das echt ne schöne Allzweckwaffe ;)

Antwort 1 Like

Derfnam

Urgestein

7,517 Kommentare 2,029 Likes

Ja, nett, aber die Marketingbande hat auf der Verpackung mal so richtig gnadenlos zugeschlagen:
EXTREME PERFORMANCE +++++++++
Könnte mal wer testen, ob die Katz' den 8x oder 9x vom Schreibtisch schubsen kann, bis er kaputt ist?

Antwort 2 Likes

Tim Kutzner

Moderator

812 Kommentare 657 Likes

Intel's 14nm wird neidisch

Antwort 1 Like

D
Don Omerta

Mitglied

47 Kommentare 34 Likes

Vor drei Jahren habe ich bis auf zwei USB-Sticks alle in die Tonne gekloppt. Die beiden USB-Sticks nutze ich nur noch für Bios-Update. Die anderen USB-Sticks habe ich durch zwei alte SSD (1 x Samsung 830 und 1 x Kingston HyperX aus 2012) via USB-3.0 Gehäuse ersetzt, der Speed ist halt besser und die Einbrüche bei kleinen Daten nicht so dramatisch wie bei den Sticks.
Trotzdem ein interessanter Test.....

Antwort Gefällt mir

Liquidator

Neuling

9 Kommentare 3 Likes

Hab hier 512gb, is echt ne Wucht. 🙂

Antwort Gefällt mir

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,451 Kommentare 814 Likes

Danke für den Test, übrigens auch bei CB in einer Meldung verlinkt. Vielleicht hat Igor oder jemand hier die Antworten: Sind die kleineren (und billigeren) Sticks (zB 256 oder 512 GB) ähnlich oder genau so schnell?
Davon abgesehen, ist die Frage wie Patriot oder wer auch immer das Ding herstellt die hohen Datenraten schafft ohne die üblichen Nachteile von SSD on a Stick, v.a. Power Draw? Das finde ich schon faszinierend.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,157 Kommentare 18,727 Likes

Deshalb haben die auch so ein NDA Drama drum gemacht

Antwort Gefällt mir

K
Kobichief

Urgestein

671 Kommentare 202 Likes

Erstklassige Überschall Wut mit extremer Leistung. Gratulation an Patriots Marketing, ihr habt es geschafft einem guten Produkt den Anschein eines billigen Schrottprodukts aus der Grabbelkiste für die Zielgruppe 13-Jähriger zu geben.

Antwort 1 Like

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung