CPU Practice Reviews

Crash landing with announcement or Ryzen panic? Intel painted the specs as they were needed

Some of my articles mature like old wine and it’s certainly not wrong to look at them from time to time, even with current references. This is especially true now with regard to the current “drama” surrounding Intel’s CPUs and the move with the specs for the baseline. Nobody can pretend that Intel didn’t know anything about this, because they simply changed the specs between 2021 and 2023. I’ll cautiously call it the “Ryzen effect”. And of course I can also think of a classic that I can’t include here audiovisually for licensing reasons, but the quote should actually suffice:

Two times three makes four, widewidewitt and three makes nine, I make the world, widewide as I like it
Pippi Longstocking

 

That’s exactly what happened with Intel’s specs, only in technical terms. In case anyone (doesn’t) remember, I had already leaked the key data of Intel’s Alder Lake S and Raptor Lake S in August 2021 and also listed data there that no longer appears in the normal specs that were later made public. That is, if they are still available at all. That’s also a strange thing. After all, in 2021 there was no sign of such nice gimmicks as PL1 = PL2 in performance mode and values over 188 watts in the baseline for the PL2.

August 2021

Well, and then the Ryzen effect just mentioned came into play and with it the energetic Intel pressure refueling. The good old foie gras sends its regards. But it must also be emphasized at this point that arguing solely with the PL2 for the baseline is still far too nebulous. Until October 2022, i.e. the launch of Raptor Lake, the 188 watts for the PL2 were also set in the baseline. And that’s exactly where Gigabyte has corrected this value again with its current BIOS.

October 2022

But the performance setting had already been set at 253 watts in 2021. The fact that PL1 = PL2 came directly at the launch of Raptor Lake S at the end of October, even if it was not in the October 2022 document. The whole thing was confusing for many. Especially as the results of the benchmarks differed from one another when switching between the three performance or cooler profiles “Boxed”, “Tower” or “AiO” and the values for PL1 and PL2 were always set to the same value manually afterwards (e.g. 125 / 188). So more must have happened than just changing PL1 and PL2.

We can see very clearly in the first table from the 2021 table that the PL4 of Raptor Lake S is significantly lower (in theory). However, this is a value that Intel is reluctant to make public and I will have to come back to it in a moment. Intel’s IMPV9.1 (Intel Mobile Voltage Positioning) also comes into play in all these discussions, where the processor voltage (VCC) is dynamically adjusted based on processor activity to reduce the power consumed. This enables a higher processor clock frequency for a given power consumption or a lower consumption for a given clock frequency, depending on the case. In my opinion, however, this was only finalized after the launch of RPL S.

New features include support for two VID tables with 5 mV and 10 mV resolution and support for Iout with values above 255 amps. There is also an analog AUX-Imon input on the 0x0Dh domain. There is also a change to the fast Psys counters and peak detector to support both Psys and Vsys measurements independent of the old Psys ADC input. IMPV9 was already a big step forward in the 10th generation compared to IMPV8, which we still know from the CPUs of the 9th generation.

The “mysterious” PL4

Things like Processor Pmax, Never Exceed and Limit are calculated “a priori” and are therefore a genuine PROACTIVE limit value (the result itself is planned and achieved through differentiated advance planning and targeted interventions). PL1 and PL2 only refer to the average performance and are REACTIVE limits, where only values can be reacted to retrospectively. The mysterious PL4 refers to peak power events, which before Alder Lake and Raptor Lake could only be handled proactively and often never turned out to be completely optimal in the end.

A new, REACTIVES PL4, on the other hand, is the ideal solution from Intel’s point of view, in which the SoC frequencies remain as high as possible, but with a safety net based on Fast PROCHOT#. This is a digital output pin that has been around since Intel’s Pentium 4 processors and indicates that the internal thermal control circuit has been activated. This happens when the processor has reached its maximum safe operating temperature. However, the SoC frequency is still determined by the PL4.

When PROCHOT# is enabled, the total power of the SoC is always BELOW PL4_Safe, i.e. lower than the value set for the PL4. PL4_Safe therefore represents the level of peak power that the input power sources can deliver without fear of overloading the power supply (VRM) and the other components connected in between. Fast PROCHOT# is really fast. Vsys1 is monitored by the IMPV9.1 controller and PROCHOT# is activated within 2 μs (adjustable) after the threshold is exceeded. The CPU is then throttled 1μs later. Fast PROCHOT# thus enables a higher PL4, which leads to better responsiveness down to low load states while maintaining system stability, but also generates harder load changes.

However, one of the most important pieces of information is the interval of PL4. Here, this state can last up to 10 ms, but never longer. But it is not written anywhere how long the pauses between these high load states must be.

CPU spikes vs. GPU spikes

The Potential Peak Power (PPP)

The PPP is an expected worst-case power level calculated by the Power Control Unit (PCU) based on the component characteristics and the current operating frequency (IA, GT, ring domains). This occurs before each frequency transition (usually at 1-ms boundaries), or whenever AVX commands enter the pipeline or a core C state change is imminent. PPP assumes a scenario across domains, which is the most intensive known application.

So what does this mean in the context of the PL4? Quite simply: the PL4 is the limit value to which PPP is ultimately compared! If PPP at the frequency transition is > PL4, a lower frequency is selected to prevent PPP from exceeding PL4. Incidentally, PPP is purely a projection and is NOT based on the power telemetry of the current workload. The PPP projection is also not displayed via a software interface, but is only used within the CPU.

The absolute peak performance can therefore only be reduced preventively via the PL4 settings. Of course, I can only speculate, but the current problems are certainly also the result of the unfortunate exaggeration of the PL4 and thus the PPP as well as the previous degradation of the CPUs due to overly optimistic default settings.

Comparison with the current status

The earliest document I have with the current, significantly higher values of PL1 and PL2 is revision 2.5 from February 2023 and already contains the Extreme Config, which did not exist before. This will then continue unchanged until revision 3.5 from December 2023:

December 2023

It is also interesting in this context that there are no officially available explanations or readout options for the PL4 values that are currently actually implemented, whereby 420 watts are assumed for the K models of the I9. However, it can be assumed that these have been adjusted in the new BIOS from Gigabyte, for example, in parallel to the 188 watts for the PL2, which was originally in the Intel specifications at 314 watts. Anyone who has the right hardware and can therefore read out and compare the values from the first table in the BIOS will certainly be able to determine this. However, this also means that Intel alone is probably to blame for the current situation. Because what is not released will not be implemented by the board manufacturers.

Intel had already committed itself to Arrow Lake S. According to the latest (unofficial) information, the TDP is 125W, which is standard for unlocked CPUs from Intel. The PL2 rating of 177 watts is significantly lower than that of the Core i9-13900K and 14900K (currently rated at 253W), which means a 43% reduction in power consumption. The situation is similar with the PL4 power limit, which is said to be set at 333W. If we now take the reported PL4 limit of 420W, this would correspond to a 26% reduction. This is of course purely speculative, but it also shows that Intel is (or was) well aware of the problems with the PL4 and thus the PPP, which cannot be changed directly.

Here once again the link to my article from Saturday, which also contains my leak of Intel’s internally distributed preliminary report:

Intel veröffentlicht das „13th and 14th Generation K SKU Processor Instability Issue Update“

 

106 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

DrWandel

Mitglied

83 Kommentare 68 Likes

Das "Pippi Langstrumpf"-Zitat passt in der Tat hervorragend! Aber bitte "Pippi" statt "Pipi".
(Ich habe die Melodie dazu noch voll im Kopf)

[Update: Ich sehe, das ist jetzt schon korrigiert.]

Antwort 1 Like

arcDaniel

Urgestein

1,632 Kommentare 902 Likes

Kurz: die MB-Hersteller sind nicht alleine für die Misere Verantwortlich.

Antwort 2 Likes

big-maec

Urgestein

869 Kommentare 509 Likes

Das schlimme wird sein, das Problem begleitet einem wieder länger als man möchte und wenn dann mal wieder der Mantel des Schweigens drübergelegt wird, ist vielleicht später noch mit weiteren Problemen zu rechnen. Sorry Intel, für mich ist diese Serie jetzt gestorben.

Antwort 1 Like

p
pinkymee

Mitglied

67 Kommentare 61 Likes

Irgendwie sind die alle nicht lernfähig. Solche oder ähnliche Dinge passieren immer und immer wieder.
Vermutlich profitgier. Und/oder Spekulationen am Aktienmarkt usw.... Am Ende ist es immer das Selbe.
Bitter, aber nicht zu ändern ;)

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,298 Kommentare 19,083 Likes

Ich stelle 253 Gläser mit Marmelade auf den Frühstückstisch, darunter auch Honig und Nutella (PL1 = PL2). Dann mache ich dem Kind keinerlei echte Vorschriften, wie viel Süßkram es sich zentimeterdick aufs Weißbrot spachteln darf (<= 4096 Löffel), weil ich davon ausgehe, das es schon von allein aufhören wird, wenn es satt ist (PROCHOTt#). Oder spätestens dann, wenn ihm übel wird uns es kotzen muss. (PL4, PPP). Dass das nicht ewig gut geht, sagen dann der Allgemeinarzt ("Fettes Kind") und der Diabetologe (irreversible Degradation).

Ja, die Marmeladen-Kollektion auf dem Tisch impliziert Wohlstand und sieht fürs Social Media schön aus, aber auf Dauer muss das schiefgehen. Und dann streiten sich Eltern und die Süßkram-Lobby um die Schuld. Einfach weniger auf den Tisch stellen und aufpassen, wie viel der kleine Spachtelkönig da draufzementiert wäre sicher DIE Lösung, aber dann kommt das Nachbarkind und flext mit seinem fetten Ranzen...

Antwort 42 Likes

big-maec

Urgestein

869 Kommentare 509 Likes

Erstmal abwarten welche Lösung das Problem auf Dauer wirklich behebt und danach auf jeden Fall hartnäckig dran bleiben und versuchen, die skeptischer zu Testen und die Prüftiefe zu erhöhen. Hätte auch nichts gegen einen 24/7 Stunden Stabilitätstest.

Vielleicht ist das ja auch schon KI-Engineering, @ Intel?:unsure:

EDIT:
Huch, weiß ja nicht, wer der User mit dem Namen Intel ist, der Editor hatte mir das automatisch abgeändert als Username.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,298 Kommentare 19,083 Likes

KI = Kein Interesse :P

Antwort 4 Likes

d
dman

Veteran

168 Kommentare 100 Likes

:ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:was zur Hölle...ohne Vorwarnung sowas rauszuhauen.(y)

Antwort 3 Likes

S
Savage_Sinusoid

Mitglied

19 Kommentare 6 Likes

In dieser Hinsicht tickt die Chipindustrie wie die Automobilbranche: Solange eine Mehrheit des Kundenstamms rein auf die Anzahl der (F)PS lugt und die Verbrauchswerte ignoriert, sind genau solche Exzesse die logische Konsequenz. Das hat auch damit zu tun, dass in einem Enthusiasmus-getriebenen Markt die ominöse "Leistungskrone" extrem wichtig fürs Marketing ist. Wer will schon vom Zweitbesten kaufen?

Und genau anhand der (Nicht-)Diskussion solcher Auswüchse lässt sich sehr trennscharf unterscheiden zwischen Marketing-Handlangerei und echtem Journalismus.

Antwort 4 Likes

L
Legostein

Neuling

2 Kommentare 0 Likes

Es ist immer wieder ein lehrreicher Eye-Opener, wie hier in die Tiefe gehende Analysen den von Nebelkerzenwerfern & Co. verbreiteten Nebel lichten, und das über die gesamte Breite des für Consumer relavanten EDV-Spektrums. Herzlichen Dank dafür.

Immerhin zieht man bei PCGH, wenn auch etwas weniger ausführlich, die gleichen Schlussfolgerungen wie hier Igor. Quelle: PCGH

Die CB moniert die mangelnde Transparenz des Baseline-Profils. Quelle: CB

Beim LUXX heißt es dagegen schlicht, es sei nun offensichtlich, dass seitens der Mainboardhersteller die Intelvorgaben missachtet wurden. Quelle: LUXX

Antwort Gefällt mir

Tolotos66

Mitglied

29 Kommentare 17 Likes

Elektromigration?
Reihenweise RMAs in 2 Jahren.
Die Foren werden sich füllen :D
Gruß T.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Lieblingsbesuch

Veteran

451 Kommentare 80 Likes

Müsste Intel nicht eigentlich von den MB Herstellern verklagt werden?

Antwort Gefällt mir

onyman

Veteran

240 Kommentare 128 Likes

Die einigen sich außergerichtlich mit Nebenabsprachen.

Die sind doch voneinander abhängig. Und da hackt eine Krähe der anderen kein Auge aus.

Antwort 1 Like

B
Besterino

Urgestein

6,817 Kommentare 3,395 Likes

Was ein Scheiß. Mein blöde Kiste mit dem 13900KS rennt seit Anbeginn ihrer Zeit auf 6.3GHz auf nem Asus z790 Hero absolut stabil.

Getreu dem Motto "never touch a running system" hab ich, seitdem ich die Kiste seinerzeit eingestellt und mühsam stabile und gleichzeitig möglichst konservative Settings ausgelotet hatte, noch nichtmal ein BIOS-Update gemacht. Das heißt, ich bin auf 0813 vom Stand Januar 2023 und seitdem hat es sage und schreibe 11 (!) neue BIOS-Versionen gegeben (einschließlich dem jetzt aktuellen 2202 mit dem Baseline Profile.

So richtig Lust, wieder bei 0 anzufangen und nun mühsam zu gucken, a) was sich bei allen Settings mit dem Baseline Profile ändert und b) mit welchen Settings ich wieder auf meinen hübschen Takt komme ohne dabei Gefahr zu laufen, über die Zeit die CPU zu grillen. Besonders doof wäre ja, wenn die Kiste dann wegen schon erlittener Degration mit dem Baseline Profile schon gar nicht mehr stabil rennt.

Aber ich glaub, ich steige mal in den Kaninchenbau mit dem BIOS-Update und hoffe einfach...

Antwort 3 Likes

Lieblingsbesuch

Veteran

451 Kommentare 80 Likes

Aber bestimmt nicht innerhalb der Intel Vorgaben.

Antwort 1 Like

Y
Yumiko

Urgestein

502 Kommentare 216 Likes

Am Ende des Tages machen die was Intel denen sagt (also die Spezifikation zulässt und idR von Intel abgesegnet wird).

Antwort Gefällt mir

H
Hillar

Mitglied

17 Kommentare 3 Likes

Danke Igor für den Artikel! Ich bin immer wieder beeindruckt wie weit ihr bei den Analysen in die Tiefe geht! (y)

Bei Intels Veröffentlichung dass die Boardhersteller Schuld sind schoss mir zuerst das Wort "Steisand-Effekt" durch den Kopf. Passt zwar nicht genau, ist aber auch ein Bumerang.

AMD dürfte das Theater freuen ;)

Antwort Gefällt mir

B
Besterino

Urgestein

6,817 Kommentare 3,395 Likes

Woher soll ich das wissen? :P

Antwort Gefällt mir

Ifalna

Veteran

339 Kommentare 304 Likes

Ich hab lange Zeit auch so gedacht und um ehrlich zu sein interessiert mich der Energieverbrauch aus Perspektive der "Stromkosten" immer noch herzlich wenig.

Wir sind aber inzwischen an einem Punkt angekommen, an dem es schwer wird als Nutzer neben einem unter Vollast laufenden System zu sitzen ohne dabei gegrillt zu werden. Da hört der Spaß das irgendwann auf. Selbst meine 3080 kann ich mit ihren ~380W im Sommer nicht unter Vollast laufen lassen. Ne Graka die bis zu 600W verballert mag ich mir gar nicht mehr vorstellen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung