Basics CPU Motherboard Reviews

AMD’s Scalable Voltage Interface 3 (SVI3) for Dummies and how to check if your AM5 Mainboard is SAFE

Terrible SoC voltages everywhere! AMD’s new horror! Say some YouTubers. But to learn more about this problem and understand why at first glance everything seems different than it actually is, we need to go back to the source, which is none other than SVI3. In this article today I will try to shed more light on this power interface used by AMD’s latest processors.

After I published the first article and especially the video, many users complained that I did not measure behind the CPU socket and that there could be a significant voltage drop on the PCB traces. Knowing that the corresponding traces are thick enough NOT to allow high voltage drops, and from the fact that the VRMs have current sense lines to adjust their output according to the load and voltage drops, I was not that concerned about it. Nevertheless, I took new measurements on the motherboard’s measurement pads and behind the CPU socket.

 

As you can see, the drop between the motherboard’s VRM output and the socket is only 0.01445V, with Prime95 running, which loads the CPU to the max. Now that we have that cleared up as well, let’s move on to the main article, which is about SVI3.

The Scalable Voltage Interface 3 (SVI3)

SVI3 is designed to provide faster and more precise control over the voltage required by the processor. It establishes a two-way communication protocol between the CPU and the motherboard’s voltage regulator modules (VRMs), allowing the CPU to control its current requirements alongside monitoring the power supply. There are some PWM controllers that are compatible with the SVI3 interface. The CPU has real-time information about the power and operating conditions of the mainboard’s VRMs. When the CPU does not need much power, it can turn off some VRMs to reduce power losses.

The CPU can enable or disable the power phases of the VRMs by sending the appropriate command to the power controller through the I2C bus. The AM5 socket has three different power rails that provide power to the CPU. One is shared between the CPU and the embedded graphics cores; the SoC rail is mainly for the I/O die (IOD), and the VDD rail is for the Infinity Fabric and other miscellaneous things.

There is almost no information about SVI3 from AMD. So I had to look for the older SVI2, on which SVI3 is based. Modern CPUs need to monitor dynamically and adjust the voltage rails that feed them accordingly. Since the CPU is generating the load, it is ideal to be able to control its power source. This could also be the case with power supplies. In fact, the ATX v3.0 and PCIe 5.0 standards use it through the 12VHPWR connector and its sinusoidal signals: CARD_PWR_STABLE and CARD_CBL_PRES# (Optional), but they are optional and I don’t see them implemented in the end.

But back to the topic at hand, the SVI2 and SVI3 are three-line interfaces with clock (SVC), data (SVD), and telemetry (SVT) lines. The SVI2 and SVI3 protocols are similar to the concept of the I²C bus, so the CPU as the master sends control packets over the SVC (clock) and SVD (data) lines to the VRM circuits of the mainboard.

 

For SVI2, the control packets consist of 3 bytes transmitted according to the SMBus send byte protocol: 1 byte to select the voltage range (core or SoC), followed by an acknowledgement bit (ACK), and then 2 bytes containing the voltage to be applied and other configuration parameters, each byte followed by an ACK bit. Because of the configuration coding, the voltage can be configured with a step size of 6.25 mV. The telemetry function (TFN) configuration bits can enable periodic voltage (and current) reports from the VR to the CPU via the SVC and SVT lines.

In SVI3, we have three rails, core, SoC, and VDD, so the first byte in the control packet must be used for three options instead of two in SVI2. The VRMs of the mainboard receive or send I2C signals through the I2C interface. The CPU sends various commands (read/write/reset registers, VID/address packets, change power state, and telemetry request) to the VRMs. There is a loop controller that controls the on/off sequence of the VRMs, handles protection functions, and controls the PWM operation of the VRMs.

The CPU includes on die integrated sensor inputs, VCC_SENSE and VSS_SENSE. If no CPU is installed and manufacturers want to test the motherboard, pairs of 100Ω resistors are required to close the circuit and provide voltage feedback. VSEN and RGND must be routed as differential pairs from the VRM controller to the CPU socket without crossing any phase node, gate driver, VIN current delivery path, and high-speed signals. VSEN is ideal for accurate measurements without having to account for voltage drops.

Most importantly, there is a remote measurement line between the VRMs and the load (the CPU) to handle voltage drops along the PCB traces, the CPU’s internal current routers, and the socket contacts. So not only is there a voltage drop on the motherboard, but we also have a drop on the pins of the motherboard that are connected to the CPU and inside the CPU!

For telemetry information, the CPU takes data from the controller, which continuously monitors the output voltage of the VRMs, from the differential voltage sensor input (VSEN pin and RGND pin). Some power controllers average the data for higher accuracy to reduce measurement noise. The controller also collects information about the current output (Iout) and temperature to the CPU. So if the CPU detects that something is wrong, it can make the appropriate changes to the VRM operation using the data provided.

I would like to note that most of the protection functions are handled by the motherboard current controller, including overcurrent, overheat, undervoltage, and overvoltage protection. For example, when the overvoltage protection is triggered, the controller forces the low-voltage MOSFETs to turn on, so the high-voltage MOSFETs are turned off and the VRMs are disconnected from the input of the power supply (12V).

Regarding the overheat protection, when the controller receives an “overheat” signal, it transmits it to the CPU via the I2C bus, and it reduces the power consumption by reducing the CPU load. Therefore, the quality of VRMs is important for the speed of the CPU. If VRMs get hot quickly during overload, the CPU must reduce its load to let them cool down.

Conclusions and conclusion

From all this, we can come to the following conclusions:

  • SVI3 allows the CPU to fully control the VRM phases of the motherboard.
  • SVI3 can not only take measurements, but also provide all types of measurements, including of course all voltage levels fed to the corresponding circuits of the CPU.
  • The only way to get voltage measurements inside the CPU is to use SVI3.
  • We have no way of knowing if the measurements SVI3 provides inside the CPU are accurate because we cannot measure them externally.
  • There is a voltage drop between the VRM output of the motherboard and the socket, which in my case, for the VSOC, under full load, is 0.01445V.
  • There is a voltage drop between the socket’s power connection and what the CPU’s internal circuits receive, due to the connections through the motherboard’s pins and the power losses within the CPU’s internal power lines. In my case, I measured 1.35294V on the back of the socket, while the CPU VDDCR_SOC (SVI3 TFN) voltage was 1.295V as reported by HWinfo. This means that from the back of the socket to the corresponding circuit of the CPU, the voltage drop is 0.05794V, while if you take the motherboard VRM output as a starting point, the voltage drop is 0.07239V, which is significant.

AMD has stated that anything above 1.30V VSOC is unsafe and should be avoided, but has not clarified at what point. At the motherboard VRMs, at the back of the sockets, or in the internal circuitry of the CPU? I talked to people from Gigabyte and they told me that they try to keep the VSOC voltage below 1.3V according to the information from SVI3, which means inside the CPU where we can’t make measurements by physical means, only by software. A lower VSOC SVI3 voltage than 1.30V, for example 1.25V, creates problems for RAM kits with EXPO profile enabled.

From all this, I can safely assume that if you check your motherboard CPU VDDCR_SOC voltage (SVI3 TFN) and find that it is below 1.30V (while running a stressful benchmark and EXPO is enabled), you can also be sure that everything always runs according to AMD’s specifications. For me, the problem is that I can’t take physical measurements of this voltage and I’m troubled by the significant voltage drop of 0.05794V between the CPU socket and the circuitry inside the CPU. But this is said to be even higher for Intel.

References and sources:

  • Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. 2018. understanding power management and processor performance determinism. Retrieved 2023-05-17 from https://www.amd.com/system/files/documents/understanding-power-management.pdf
  • Buhren, R., Jacob, H. N., Krachenfels, T., & Seifert, J. (2021). One Glitch to Rule Them All: Fault Injection Attacks Against AMD’s Secure Encrypted Virtualization. ArXiv. /abs/2108.04575
  • Renesas Electronics Corporation. 2020. ISL62776 Multiphase PWM Regulator for AMD CPUs Using SVI2. Retrieved 2023-05-17 from https://www.renesas.com/us/en/document/dst/isl62776-datasheet
  • Richtek Technology Corporation. 2023. Dual Channel PWM Controller with I2C Interface Control for AMD SVI3 CPU/GPU Core Power Supply. Retrieved 2023-05-17 from https://www.richtek.com/assets/product_file/RT3667BT/DS3667BT-00.pdf

 

My thanks go to the guest author, whose insights I am of course happy to share. If you want to know more about Aris, hwbusters.com (this article was also first published here) and Cybenetics i would like to recommend the respective homepages. You will find unique content based on real and independent measurements. I also recommend the new Powenetics V2 PMD or reading about the product:

Powenetics V2 – Power Measurements Device – Review

 

164 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

Case39

Urgestein

2,519 Kommentare 942 Likes

Lese ich hier ne Gratwanderung der Spannungsversorgung heraus?

"Eine niedrigere VSOC SVI3 Spannung als 1.30V, zum Beispiel 1.25V, schafft Probleme für RAM-Kits mit aktiviertem EXPO-Profil."

"Aus alledem kann ich sicher annehmen, dass, wenn man seine Hauptplatine CPU VDDCR_SOC Spannung (SVI3 TFN) überprüft und feststellt, dass sie unter 1.30V liegt (während ein stressiger Benchmark läuft und EXPO aktiviert ist), man auch sicher sein kann, dass alles immer gemäß AMDs Vorgaben läuft. Für mich ist es ein Problem, dass ich keine physischen Messungen dieser Spannung vornehmen kann und ich bin durch den erheblichen Spannungsabfall von 0.05794V zwischen der CPU-Sockel und dem Schaltkreis innerhalb der CPU beunruhigt."

Antwort Gefällt mir

Wake

Mitglied

53 Kommentare 25 Likes

X670 Carbon mit 1.0.0.7a AGESA UEFI stellt SoC direkt auf 1.3V wenn ich XMP eines 2x32GB 6600 CL32 Kits lade, auf 6000 zurückgedreht hab ich erstmal 1.28V manuell eingestellt und bis jetzt ist alles stabil.

Jemand mit mehr RAM-Kits zur Verfügung könnte ja mal nachschauen, welche SoC-Spannungswerte bei verschiedenen, niedrigeren EXPO/XMP-Profilen eingetragen werden oder ob eh alle direkt auf 1.3V geprügelt werden :unsure:.

Antwort Gefällt mir

big-maec

Urgestein

869 Kommentare 509 Likes

Sorry mußte ein bißchen grinsen als ich "Schlussfolgerunen" gelesen habe wenn ich nicht mehr weiter weiß lege ich meine Runen Karten.

Antwort 2 Likes

amd64

1

1,105 Kommentare 676 Likes

Meinungsverstärkung durch ganze Sätze in Fettschrift ist unnötig und hässlich.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Case39

Urgestein

2,519 Kommentare 942 Likes

Dann bringt die 1.0.0.7a wohl nicht viel?!

Antwort Gefällt mir

Carcasse

Veteran

332 Kommentare 117 Likes

Wenn ich Bild 2 so sehe fällt mir das Mädel mit dem Lötkolben ein...schönen Feiertag. ;)

Antwort Gefällt mir

s
summit

Veteran

150 Kommentare 73 Likes

Liest sich wie von einem technischen Projektleiter bei "ASUS" (Gigabyte ist hier imho nur Mitläufer) der nun seinem Vorgesetzten im Management erklären muss was da los ist. ;)
Aber selbst wenn ich das "Pendel der Schuld" zu AMD schieben will, ich komme so auch nicht auf bis zu 1,5 V_SOC.
Besoffen muss man sein wenn man als "technisch Verantwortlicher" sagen/schreiben würde:
"AMD hat erklärt, dass alles über 1.30V VSOC unsicher ist und vermieden werden sollte, hat aber nicht klargestellt, an welchem Punkt. An den VRMs des Mainboards, an der Rückseite der Sockel oder im internen Schaltkreis der CPU?"
Das ist echt geil, selbst wenn die das bis jetzt noch nicht mitbekommen haben(!) wie die Angaben zu interpretieren sind. Wie wäre es dann mal seinen "Partner" (was AMD wäre) zu fragen?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,298 Kommentare 19,083 Likes

Feiertag ist gut... :(

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,298 Kommentare 19,083 Likes

220 Volt Steckdose :D

Antwort 1 Like

D
Deridex

Urgestein

2,218 Kommentare 851 Likes

Bei Angaben bis auf die letzte angezeigte Stelle bei Messgeräten stellt es mir immer wieder die Haare auf. Bei meiner Haarlänge sieht das doof aus.

Antwort 2 Likes

Case39

Urgestein

2,519 Kommentare 942 Likes

Wenn ich mir rückblickend die ganze Geschichte, beginnend Ende April, mit den Berichten zu abfackelnden CPU usw...ansehe, komm ich zum Ergebnis das sich niemand bei AMD und den Boardpartnern (vllt. mit einzelnen Ausnahmen), so richtig mit ihren Produkten auskennt, sonst würde sowas erst nicht aufkommen.
Sowas kenne ich aus meiner Arbeitswelt. Da liefern wir als Kunden, den Herstellern, tiefergehende Lösungen...

@Igor Wallossek Mir drängt sich gerade der Gedanke auf, das EXPO auf AM5 gar nicht laufen kann.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,298 Kommentare 19,083 Likes

Dann beschwere Dich doch mal bei keysight und frage höflich an, warum sie keine Folie zum Abkleben der Displays mitliefern :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

C
Cr@zed^

Mitglied

10 Kommentare 9 Likes

Also, ich habe ein ASUS X670E Board, eine Ryzen9 X3D CPU und ein 64GiB Ram Kit, das mit Expo 6000 läuft. Trotzdem kann ich ruhig schlafen und genieße die paar Stunden in der Woche am PC, die ich mir abknöpfen kann. Mache ich etwas falsch, wenn ich nicht auf den Hysteria Train aufspringe, oder bin ich einfach zu alt dazu?

Antwort 2 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,298 Kommentare 19,083 Likes

Ich habe seit 5 Jahren privat keine Asus Boards mehr und schlafe perfekt. :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

S
Shama

Mitglied

85 Kommentare 45 Likes

Meine Meinung aus meiner OC Zeit und Erfahrung ist immer die gleiche. Automatisches übertakten ist einfach nur für Leute die keine Ahnung haben. Wer Ahnung von PCs und dem Übertakten hat, macht dies händisch. Denn dabei verliert man nicht die Kontrolle über die Spannungen, die je nach Hersteller fast schon willkürlichen Spannungssteigerungen. Zudem hat man damals in meiner OC Zeit (Sockel 754, AM2) immer die Leute davor gewarnt, bloß nicht zu übertreiben und ja schön langsam und vorsichtig zu sein.

Jetzt wird man zugemüllt mit automatischen OC und sogar die Boards hauen die Spannungen in die Höhe, wenn man nur an den Frequenzen spielt.
Für mich ist AM5 mit Ryzen 7000 keine Plattform zum Übertakten. Vielleicht etwas optimieren, also maximal DDR5 5600 und an den Timings spielen und möglicherweise etwas untervolten.

AMD wusste eben schon vorher, dass Raptor einfach eine harte Konkurrenz zu AM5 sein wird. Dann wollte man halt wenigstens mit EXPO scheinen und zeigt ständig Benches mit DDR5 6000.
Dabei zeigen doch die Ergebnisse, dass DDR5 6000 keinen Mehrwert hat zu DDR5 5200. Dann doch lieber CL28 und vielleicht DDR5 5400 probieren.

Antwort 2 Likes

P
Pokerclock

Veteran

459 Kommentare 381 Likes

Ich muss demnächst zwei Systeme mit einem Asus Prime X670-P Wifi ausstatten (dazu 7800X3D, 2x 32 GB RAM), weil es das einzige Board auf dem Markt ist, das für AM5 zwei elektrisch angebundene x4-Slots bietet für Blackmagic SDI-Karten und gleichzetig die Dickschiff-3,5-Slot-Grafikkarten aufnehmen kann.

Asus ist für mich seit Jahren gestorben, aber wenn es nicht anders geht und der Kunde einen lukrativen Mietauftrag erteilen möchte, dann muss ich halt über meinen eigenen Schatten springen. BIOS ist auch keine zwei Tage alt. Dennoch wird es so sein, dass ich EXPO erst einmal ausgeschaltet lasse. Muss dann halt mit DDR5-4800 laufen.

Also falls jemand mal einen Vergleich zwischen zwei identischen Systemen haben möchte, gerne melden. Meine letzte persönliche Erfahrung mit Asus waren 20 defekte Mainboards für 52 identische Miet-PCs. Seitdem ist Asus bei mir auf der Blacklist.

Antwort Gefällt mir

big-maec

Urgestein

869 Kommentare 509 Likes

Mal eine Frage, das Gigabyte Board hat ja Messpunkte auf dem Board mit der Bezeichnung "Voltage Measurement Points"

Messpunkte haben die Bezeichnung: VDDIO_MEM, VDD_MISC, VCORE, VCORE_SOC, CPU_VDD18, PM_VCC18

Wenn ich die mit einem Multimeter nachmessen würde und alles ok ist, müsste das ja eigentlich save sein, oder?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Roland83

Urgestein

691 Kommentare 532 Likes

Das hat doch nichts mit Hysteria zu tun, derart hohe VSOC Spannungen werden die Lebensdauer der CPU drastisch reduzieren - bis hin zum plötzlichen Tod nach wenigen Wochen/Monaten wie wir gesehen haben. Dafür braucht man keinen "Train" das ist schlicht und einfach logisch.
Wer sich informiert hat ja jetzt alles das er braucht um gegenzusteuern und wer einfach lustig weiter mit den EXPO Profilen fährt spielt halt gern Lotto oder hat zu viel Geld bzw. es ist ihm schlicht und einfach egal ob der PC morgen noch funktioniert oder nicht.
Wobei es uns erwachsenen natürlich am Ende immer selber überlassen bleibt was wir mit unserer Hardware anstellen, also alles gut ;) Nur dann halt nachher nicht meckern.

Antwort 1 Like

Roland83

Urgestein

691 Kommentare 532 Likes

Kommt halt drauf an wo diese Messpunkte ansetzen .. Denn wie Igor bzw seine Kollegen beim messen schon gezeigt haben kann das ganze je nach Messpunkt halt weit auseinanderdriften... Aber da wir jetzt auch wissen um welche Bereich es da in etwa geht kann man ja rechnen und dann überlegen ob man gegensteuern möchte oder ob es in jeden Fall im grünen Bereich sein sollte.
Meine Meinung hab ich eh schon oft genug Kund getan, ich würde im Moment mit dem SOC so weit runter wie möglich ( unter bzw max 1.2 V) und beim DDR halt etwas Federn lassen, falls das überhaupt notwendig ist.... Bringt ja nichts wegen 5fps den Rechner zu riskieren solang bis AMD und Boardpartner hier mit einer seriösen Lösung kommen.

Ja leider ist der Mitbewerb bei I/O oft schlecht aufgestellt was es einem dann schwierig mach timmer um Asus herzum zu rudern.. Entweder zu wenitg USB ... dafür das ganze PS2 Geraffel das eh kaum noch jemand braucht, oder zu wenig Slots ...
Asus hat da idr einfach die beste Austattung.
Aber das war bei AM4 leider auch schon so :(

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Dr. Aristeidis Mpitziopoulos

Chief Test Engineer at Cybenetics LTD

Ph.D. in Wireless Sensor Networks
Bachelor in Computer Science and Electronics
Telecommunications Engineer Degree

Werbung

Werbung