CPU Latest news

AMD talks about Zen 5, x86S and more, but won’t follow Intel’s P-Core and E-Core hybrid approach

AMD’s vice president says that AMD would not follow Intel’s approach with hybrid architecture and instead wants to bring Zen 5 to desktops as soon as possible. In the interview, David McAfee, corporate vice president and general manager of the Client Channel Business at AMD, talked about the company’s existing portfolio as well as upcoming products and their planned expansion. The talk began with AMD’s Ryzen AI, which he said makes up a large part of the new Ryzen 7040 mainstream laptop series, codenamed “Phoenix.”

Source: WccfTech

David’s most important revelation here concerns the hybrid CPU architecture. He said that it is known that AMD now has two types of Zen 4 cores, the standard Zen 4 and the density-optimized Zen 4C. David also elaborated that one way to do a hybrid CPU is to go the P-cores and E-cores route, but would not be what the red team had in mind at all. The reason, he said, is that two different cores very with different ISA capabilities made it harder to match the operating system and applications to the optimal cores for each. Intel was solving this problem with its Thread Director technology, but it would be so AMD could use similar but completely differently tuned architectures for its own hybrid approach, he said.

Source: TechpowerUp

In an earlier interview with AMD’s CTO Mark Papermaster, it was revealed that hybrid client and server CPUs were already on the way, he said. It was known, he said, that Zen 4 and Zen 4C would have the same ISA, with minor changes in between that would not make them a completely new chip. More important, he said, is that the right core is used for the right tasks. AMD believes such cores would provide little benefit on an unconstrained platform such as desktops, but could provide a greater advantage in constrained designs such as laptops, he said.

AMD’s hybrid approach is expected to be adopted much more quickly on the laptop front, he said, with the first products shipping with the upcoming Strix Point APU line.

I know that Mark Papermaster talked a lot of about different core types coming into our portfolio. I guess what I would say is that as we’ve looked at different core types there’s probably two things that are overarching factors that we think about in terms of how they fit into the portfolio. One is the notion that P-Cores and E-Cores that the competition uses is not the approach that we plan on taking at all. Because I think the reality is that when you get to the point of having core types with different ISA capabilities or IPC or things like that, it makes it very complicated to ensure that the right workloads are scheduled on the right cores, consistently.

Does that make its way into a desktop processor where you’re power-unconstrained, I think that’s a harder argument to make. We’re constantly looking at different core types, how they might fit into our architectures in the future, but I think there’s some more obvious places where different core types come in and bring an advantage much more quickly than in the desktop space.

I think laptops are a far more practical application for where you might see that adopted much more quickly.

AMD VP, David McAfee (via TechpowerUp)

David also talked about Zen 5 and how they are working full steam ahead to bring their latest and greatest architecture to desktops as quickly as possible. He said the chip design is already on track for release before the end of 2024 and would be available as a Ryzen 8000 desktop CPU with additional RDNA 3.5 graphics cores.

Source: WccfTech

It is also emphasized that the increase in the number of cores is proportional to the available bandwidth. You can increase the number of cores all you want to say, “Hey, we have the most cores/threads on our chip,” but that doesn’t matter if the core bandwidth isn’t available. The excess cores will not have a linear impact on performance, he said. Such a design would lead to performance degradation, and that is the limitation associated with dual-channel memory platforms, he said. Once faster memory is available for higher bandwidths on these platforms, we could see another jump in the number of cores, but it looks very much like they will stick with 16 cores in the Zen 5 series for now.

What we are looking for with Zen 5 is to bring it into the desktop space as quickly as we possibly can. As excited as we are about Zen 4, I think what you’ve seen from AMD is that every step in that processor core architecture gives us just such an amazing uplift in terms of capability, in terms of IPC, in terms of performance across every possible workload that you see in desktop and mobile applications. We’re working very, very hard to get it into the market as fast as possible, I know that Mark has talked in the past about how Zen 5 is on-track, it’s in-design, it’s taped-out etc so we are working very hard on it and I think you’re going to be very excited when you see that product come to market.

AMD VP, David McAfee (via TechpowerUp)

Source: AMD

Speaking of APUs, it appears that Phoenix AM5 desktop chips are already in the works as AMD has found a market for them. That market isn’t as big in the do-it-yourself space, he said, but the OEM users who need a chip that can house a GPU and allow them to do all their tasks in an SFF or commercial PC are definitely big enough to warrant such a product. So AMD is saying that if there is a PC market for users who want such chips, AMD will definitely support those customers.

That’s especially good, he said, considering that there have been several reports of AMD Ryzen 7000G or Phoenix AM5 desktop APUs being delayed until later this year or early 2024. One would hope that AMD could realize a reasonable DIY and OEM release, as these APUs offer a lot of value in the budget segment, especially considering the prices for discrete GPUs, which are hard to come by under $200. A sub-$200 chip with an RDNA 3 GPU offering similar performance to a $100-$150 discrete GPU would be great for gamers, he said.

As the Ryzen Desktop Guy I think about that question a lot. You know even in our AM4 portfolio there are very different customers who buy a 5600G vs a 5600X. There’s a class of buyers who wants to build SFF desktops, that wants to do things like APU based gaming. I think there will be a set of people where a Phoenix-based desktop APU would be very attractive for them, with RDNA3 graphics and Zen 4 CPU cores. I think there will be some people that will want that.

AMD VP, David McAfee (via TechpowerUp)

Source: AMD

On the subject of x86S, which was recently proposed by Intel to pave the way for 64-bit-only architectures, AMD says it will definitely look at it and has been evaluating similar proposals for a long time. They find Intel’s proposal very interesting.

We have absolutely been looking at that. We’ve been evaluating similar proposals for a long, long time. It is both incredibly beneficial to make that break, also very, very complicated. I think it is a non-trivial exercise to strip out legacy compatibility in a core architecture as well as time that in a way so that it matches up perfectly with an OS transition that also eliminates a lot of these legacy compatibilities. I would say “very interesting,” something that really, we would have to look at as an industry and make that move in concert. We find Intel’s proposal pretty intriguing as we look at that.

AMD VP, David McAfee (via TechpowerUp)

All in all, it was a very nice interview with David and they can’t wait to see the new chips in action. They are particularly looking forward to the hybrid approaches and especially the AM5 launches, which would include both Zen 5 and APUs for the low-cost DIY and OEM markets.

Source: WccfTech

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

arcDaniel

Urgestein

1,657 Kommentare 916 Likes

Interessantes Interview. Bin allerdings enttäuscht, dass AMD nicht auf den Weg von Hybrid/bigLITTLE CPUs gehen möchte. Im ARM Bereich seit Jahren ganz Normal und Intel hat es mittlerweile super im Griff.

Es klingt schon fast, als bräuchten sie hierfür Resourcen die sie nicht hätten, oder nutzen wollen.

Was ich auch komisch finde ist das mit RDNA3,5. RDNA3 gab es eher iGPU bevor die Grafikkarten auf den Markt kamen. Mich stimmt dies skeptisch, dass wir RDNA4 Grafikkarten vor 2025 sehen werden. Und RDNA3.5 wird sicher besser als 3, aber auch keinen Riesen Sprung machen, sonst hätte AMD aus Marketing Gründen sofort RDNA4 benutzt.

Mit Ryzen hat es AMD wieder und sogar sehr schnell nach vorne Gebracht. Seit Zen4 sind Plattformpreise gestiegen und persönlich finde ich dass es irgendwie an Inovation fehlt. Meine persönlicher Eindruck ist, dass sie ihr Momentum verloren haben.

Sie stehen zwar im CPU Bereich hervorragend dar, aber wenn sie nicht dahinter bleiben, naja Intel versucht auch wieder auf zu stehen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

c
cunhell

Urgestein

558 Kommentare 526 Likes

Lies doch erst mal nach was Zen 4c bedeutet.

Nvidia soll die nächste Generation auch erst 2025 bringen.
Öhm, also die neuen Epyc-Prozessoren sind im Moment in vielen Fällen klar gegen Intel im Vorteil.

Cunhell

Antwort Gefällt mir

R
RX_Vega1975

Veteran

165 Kommentare 46 Likes

RDNA 3.5 kann ein Gefixter Navi 31 mit Mehr Takt und Besserer Effizienz werden
um gegen die 4080 und 4090 gegenhalten zu können.
Fakt ist aber auch das die 7900XTX nun so gut wie immer schneller als eine 4080 ist (und oftmals mehr als nur wenige Prozent)
und zudem auch billiger, so um die 80 bis 150 Euro.

Antwort 1 Like

a
alexk94

Neuling

3 Kommentare 4 Likes

@arcDaniel: Hier findest du genaueres zum Thema Zen 4c.

Da gibt es einige Änderungen im Aufbau.

Antwort Gefällt mir

O
Oberst

Veteran

342 Kommentare 131 Likes

Du hast das falsch verstanden. AMD geht den Weg, den ARM schon lange geht: Verschiedene Kerne mit gleichen Features kombinieren. Intel geht bisher den Weg, verschiedene Kerne mit unterschiedlichen Features zu kombinieren. Diesen Weg geht AMD nicht mit. Intel hat deswegen ja so Probleme wie: AVX512 können nur die P-Kerne, nicht die E-Kerne, daher wird es in den P-Kernen deaktiviert (inzwischen wohl per Cut, lässt sich angeblich daher auch nicht mehr aktivieren).
Intel geht den Weg, weil sie die Kerne vorher auch schon hatten: Core und Atom. Und Atom war halt in den Features immer deutlich schwächer als Core. Das ist jetzt immer noch so, daher muss man eben die Features, die Core "mehr" bietet deaktivieren.
Ich gehe davon aus, dass Intel früher oder später die Features angleichen wird, aktuell hat man das aber noch nicht geschafft.

AMD braucht nichts angleichen, die streichen nur Sachen aus Zen weg, welche keine Anpassungen voraussetzen (Cache, Transistoren für hohe Taktraten,...). Ähnliches macht ARM auch. Der A520 hat im Vergleich zum A720 auch weniger L1 und L2 Cache (wobei ARM hier viele Freiheiten gibt, maximal hat der 520 jeweils die Hälfte L1 & L2). AMD's Ziel ist: Jeder Kern (egal ob schnell oder klein) kann immer alles von irgendeinem anderen Kern übernehmen. Also z.B. auch AVX512 Berechnungen. Die Kleinen machen das halt langsamer (da weniger Takt und Cache), aber sie können das trotzdem machen. Insofern fliegt das OS dann halt auch nicht auf die Schnauze, wenn es eine AVX512 Berechnung von einem Kern auf einen anderen verschiebt.

Antwort 2 Likes

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Y
Yumiko

Urgestein

513 Kommentare 222 Likes

Schade nur dass man die e-cores bei einigen Spielen und Applikationen im Bios ausschalten muss, um mehr Performance / FPS zu bekommen.
Das kann man als "Intel hat es mittlerweile super im Griff" bezeichnen, sagt aber dann viel darüber aus, was man bei Intel alles als "normal" in Kauf nehmen muss.
Bin froh, das es mit AMD wenigstens einen Hersteller gibt, der weiterhin auch CPUs für Konsolen und PC-Spiele produziert.

Antwort 1 Like

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,638 Kommentare 961 Likes

Mit der deutlichen Unterschieden in der Architektur zwischen AMD und Intel bleibt's zumindest interessant. Zumindest im Moment kann AMD sich ja auch auf die Fertigungsknoten bedingten Effizienz Vorteile ihrer "großen" Kerne verlassen. Wird interessant sein, was sich da (zumindest im Mobilen Bereich) bei Intel tut wenn Meteor Lake in "Intel 4" im Herbst erscheint. Auch daher wird es hohe Zeit, daß AMD und OEMs ihre 4 nm Phoenix APUs jetzt in größeren Zahlen anbieten; noch ist Intel hier im Nachteil.

Antwort 1 Like

g
gruffi

Mitglied

25 Kommentare 8 Likes

@arcDaniel

Intel hat gar nichts im Griff. Deren big.LITTLE Design ist einfach nur Müll. Angefangen bei der inkompatiblen ISA zwischen P- und E-Kernen. Über unterschiedliche Features, wie z.B. SMT. Bis hin zu fragwürdigen Designentscheidungen, wie die Atom Basis der E-Kerne. Was zu unzureichenden Ergebnissen führt, wie der mageren Energieeffizienz der E-Kerne. Intel hat big.LITTLE nur aus einem Grund gebracht, nämlich um AMDs Vorsprung beim Kern- und Chiplet-Design zu kaschieren. Was ihnen mit der aktuellen Implementierung aber keineswegs gelungen ist, wenn man mal genau hinschaut. Intels Glück ist, dass AMD die TDP mittlerweile auch deutlich angehoben hat. So fällt die Diskrepanz teils gar nicht so sehr auf. Schaut man hingegen mal in die deutlich niedrigeren TDP Bereiche, da wird Intel regelrecht massakriert. Und das liegt keineswegs nur am besseren TSMC Prozess von Zen 4.

AMD hat das schon richtig erkannt, big.LITTLE ist maximal für den mobilen Markt zu gebrauchen. Und zu mehr war ARM bisher auch nicht in der Lage. Deswegen setzt Apples M1/2 vorrangig auf big Kerne. Die paar wenigen LITTLE Kerne sind nur Beiwerk für Hintergrundaufgaben. Anders als bei Intel, die weiter die Anzahl der E-Kerne nach oben schrauben. Du versuchst ARM und Intel in den gleichen Topf zu werfen. Da sind sie aber keineswegs.

Im Desktop und professionellen Markt sind hingegen homogene Designs zu bevorzugen. Das hat nichts mit Ressourcen zu tun, die AMD nicht hätte. Vielmehr ist es so, dass Intel mit dem Thread Director einen Aufwand betreibt, der ziemlich sinnfrei ist und mit besseren Kerndesign gar nicht notwendig wäre.
Es kommt im Desktop Markt nicht darauf an, unter Umständen ein paar Milliwatt einzusparen. Die Performance von big Kernen ist da weitaus wichtiger. Und im professionellen Markt ist Flächeneffizienz ein entscheidender Faktor. Genau da setzen die c-Kerne von AMD an. Keiner dieser Märkte braucht big.LITTLE. Ein homogenes Design vereinfacht vieles. Gerade auch die Arbeit der Softwareentwickler.

Ich sehe auch nirgendwo, dass AMD Momentum verloren hat. Im professionellen und mobilen Markt sind sie so gut aufgestellt wie nie zuvor. Im Desktop Markt ist es schon seit Jahren ein enges Duell. Ausnahme war vielleicht nur der miserable Rocket Lake. Da musste Intel etwas Federn lassen. Und mit Zen 5 wird AMD weiter gewaltig nachlegen. Während ich für Intels 14. Gen im Desktop nur einen uninteressanten und lauwarmen Aufguss der 13. Gen erwarte. Erst die 15. Gen dürfte wieder interessant werden. Aber vermutlich nicht vor Ende 2024. Dauert also noch. Während Zen 5 in 1H 2024 erwartet wird.

Antwort 1 Like

Klicke zum Ausklappem
8j0ern

Urgestein

2,668 Kommentare 835 Likes

@gruffi

Möge die Fliegkraft mit uns sein, Hauptsache nicht verstrahlt von den Neutrinos !

Welcome to the Elite !

Antwort 1 Like

Ifalna

Veteran

347 Kommentare 306 Likes

Als Alder-Lake nutzer möchte ich hier mal ganz ehrlich sein:
Ich hab den Sinn von den E-Cores bis heute nicht verstanden.

Wenn ich mein OS oder irgendein game beobachte, krallen sich die Prozesse random irgendwelche cores auf die die grade Lust haben. Manchesmal läuft dann auch etwas von einem game auf einem E-Core anstatt auf einem P-Core und Windows eigene Dödelei läuft dann halt auch auf einem P-Core anstatt wie für einen Hintergrund task gedacht auf nem E-Core.

Die allermeisten Anwendungen nutzen weniger als 8 Cores. Da würden nicht vorhandene E-Cores nicht weiter auffallen. Das Einzige Programm was ich nutze, dass die CPU auslastet und mal von den E-Cores profitiert ist Blender (rendering). Man muss aber schon hart masochistisch sein, dass auf der CPU anstatt mit der GPU zu machen, welche dafür < 10% der Zeit braucht.

Soweit ich das sehe gibt es nur folgende Gründe für E-Cores:

  • Intel kann keine sinnvolle Ausbeute mit 20+ P-Cores erzielen.
  • 20+ P-Cores wären für normale Kühllösungen nicht handelbar.

Also schnappt man sich abgespeckte Cores die man massenweise draufklatschen und dann auch noch kühlen kann.

Ich bleib dabei, auch als Intel Nutzer: Big-LITTLE ist im Desktopbereich absuluter Blödsinn.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Tronado

Urgestein

3,873 Kommentare 2,038 Likes

Ohne E-Cores wäre Intel in der Leistung mit dem 7/10nm Prozess nicht mehr im MC konkurrenzfähig gewesen, das haben sie sehr geschickt gemacht. Sollte 4nm und darunter effizienter arbeiten, wird es auch irgendwann keine E-Cores mehr brauchen. Die Spiele und Programme, die (unter Windows 11 wohlgemerkt) nicht korrekt auf die Cores verteilen, lassen sich an einer Hand abzählen. Mich würde bei AMDs 7900X3D und 7950X3D eher der 3D-Cache auf nur einem CCD stören, von wegen "homogene Kerne". Und bei der IPC hinkt AMD immer noch hinterher.

Antwort Gefällt mir

arcDaniel

Urgestein

1,657 Kommentare 916 Likes

Also ich hatte einen Ryzen 5600X und habe die Plattform gewechselt (Grund würde Thema hier sprengen) und habe mich bewusst für Intel entschieden. Jetzt habe ich einen Intel 13400 und habe noch keine Nachteile wegen der E-Cores feststellen können. Nach 6 Jahren Ryzen der erste Wechsel zu Intel.

Der 13400 und 5600X sind bei im Marketing-Jargon in 7Nm gefertigt, ist man böse kann man sogar sagen, dass der Intel nur in 10Nm gefertigt ist.
Dennoch verbrät der Intel weniger Energie, bietet ein gutes Stück mehr Leistung und bleibt auch Kühler (unter gleichen Voraussetzungen).

Vor dem Wechsel habe ich mich natürlich auch Richtung AMD 7600 informiert und was soll ich sagen: durch die Bank nur geringfügig schneller, verbraucht dabei mehr Energie, wird also auch wärmer und der (gezwungene) Wechsel hätte mich mehr gekostet.

Würde man den 7600 so begrenzen, dass er die gleiche Energie wie der 13400 verbraucht, sind beide gleich schnell. Dann betrachte ich eine Intel7/10Nm CPU mit einer 5Nm CPU... wo ist also der Fortschritt bei AMD? Und hier muss ich @Tronado zustimmen. Rein von der IPC hinkt AMD immer noch hinterher. AMD konnte immer mit einem besseren Preis/Leistungsverhältnis locken, was mit AM5 leider vorbei ist.

Die CPUs 13900K(S) oder 7950X(3D) sind alle nur alle Murks, hier wird auf biegen und Brechen Leistung herausgeholt um die Spitze beanspruchen zu können. Leider wird zu oft an diesen Alpha-Tieren ausgemacht, wer der bessere ist.

Schaut man sich die Vernünftigeren CPUs an, kann sich das Bild sehr schnell drehen.

Zudem frage ich mich wer im Moment mehr Probleme hat, Intel mit den E-Cores oder AMD mit ihrer CCD Aufteilung und den SMT Probleme?
Wobei ich mir sicher bin, dass der normale Nutzen nicht von diesen Geringfügigen Problemchen etwas mit bekommt. Hier muss man schon aufwändige Analysen durchführen um etwas feststellen zu können.

Das Bedeutet nun nicht, dass ich Intel Fan... wäre. Bei meinem nächsten Plattformwechsel werde ich die Situation neu bewerten. Wie ich mich kenne wäre dies wieder in 2 Jahren.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Ifalna

Veteran

347 Kommentare 306 Likes

Das sind Desktop Prozessoren, da interessiert mich nur die Leistung aber ned ob die die Kiste im Endeffekt 20W weniger oder mehr braucht. Das mag bei Batteriegestützte Geräten wichtig sein, aber ned bei Desktops.

Natürlich solange Energieverbrauch und Wärmeentwicklung im Rahmen bleiben.
Nen unhinged-Overclock 340W Monster will ich dann auch nicht in der Kiste haben.

Ein untervolteter 13900KS ist sicher effizienter als dein 13400, allein schon wegen der höheren Chipgüte und damit einhergenend niedrigerer Spannung.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Hagal77

Veteran

142 Kommentare 87 Likes

Dann bietet endlich Quad Channel RAM an, für Desktop. Hört sich erst mal so an als wird ZEN5 auch langweilig.

Nicht mehr max. Kerne und nicht mehr Speicherkanäle, bestimmt auch wieder kein Dualcache X3D...
Dann muss ich wohl auf AM6 warten.

Einzig positive keine Schmutz E Cores.

mfg

Antwort Gefällt mir

Casi030

Urgestein

11,923 Kommentare 2,339 Likes

Sicher nicht sondern 1000% auf jeden Fall,ob er wie bei AMD den halben Verbrauch schaft ist aber fraglich.

Antwort 1 Like

arcDaniel

Urgestein

1,657 Kommentare 916 Likes

Sorry war gestern nicht sonderlich gut Gelaunt, deshalb waren meine Posts etwas Schorf...

@Ifalna (aber auch die anderen) ich gebe die ganz klar Recht und auch weiss ich dass mein 13400 nicht perfekt ist. Ich braucht aber jetzt eine neue Plattform und hätte lieber einen 13900T gekauft. Da der Raptor Lake refresh for der Tür steht, wollte ich aber die günstigste CPU welche mir jetzt von der Leistung reicht.

Ich möchte auch nicht von Hand Optimierte CPUs vergleichen, da dies leider sehr viele User total überfordern. Hier im Forum weniger (liest man dennoch), gibt es User, welche mit dem Simplen installieren eines Treibers total überfordert sind, wie soll man hier verlangen eine CPU zu optimieren?

Reviews basieren sich leider immer nur auf diese K(S) und X Modelle, wo egal wie der Verbraucht ist, versucht wird, so gut wie Möglich gegenüber der Konkurrenz da zu stehen.

So ein komplettes Review einer T CPU findet man eher selten. Ich habe jetzt nur einen sehr kurzen Teste 13900T vs 12900K gefunden, und hier hat der 13900T mehr Leistung bei 28% vom Verbrauch der TDP (35W vs 125W) und weniger als der Hälte beim Turbo (106W vs 241W)

Dies Per Hand zu optimieren, benötigt schon sehr viel Zeit ohne jemals die Garantie zu haben, dass auch wirklich zu 1000% alles Stabil läuft.

Was die E-Cores angeht:

Hier sieht man, dass im Überschlag, es keinen Nachteil gibt. Was ich hier interessant finden würde, wäre eine normale Tagesnutzung verglichen mit und ohne E-Cores, was am Ende des Tages an Ersparnis raus kommt oder auch nicht. Damit meine ich nicht von Morgens bis Abends Benchmarks laufen lassen, sondern gemischt, Office, Internet, vielleicht etwas Bildverarbeitung, oder sogar rendern, wie normales Gaming (kein Gaming Benchmark). Erst dann sollte man beurteilen ob die E-Cores etwas bringen oder nicht.

Ja auch hier hat AMD ihre non-X CPUs welche wirklich sehr Sparsam sind ohne wirklichen Leistungsverlust. Dennoch sieht man beim Vergleich von solchen CPUs, wo nicht versucht wurde auf Teufel komm raus, den längsten Balken zu generieren, Intel doch noch immer die Nase vorn hat, trotz eines schlechteren Fertigungsverfahren.

Früher war Intel teils so mächtig, weil sie das beste Fertigungsverfahren hatten und genau hier sind sie stark zurückgefallen, während AMD von der super TSMC Fertigung profitieren kann. Mit all dem was ich jetzt festgestellt habe (während ich mich Aktiv und Objektiv damit Beschäftigt habe och ich bei AMD bleibe oder zu Intel wechsle), Frage ich mich, was passiert, wenn Intel bei ihrer Fertigung wieder aufholt und/oder TSMC in Stocken gerät.

Dann kommt noch mein Gewissen dazu: Intel baut in Deutschland eine Fab (ich bin weder Deutscher noch lebe ich dort), was Arbeitsplätze bringt, Steuereinnahmen... Sprich Europa hier auch profitiert und unabhängiger vom immer komplizierten östlichen Markt macht. TSMC hat Europa eine Absage erteilt. (Welche Bedeutung hat Globalfoundries überhaupt nach im aktuellen Chip Markt?)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Klicke zum Ausklappem
Ifalna

Veteran

347 Kommentare 306 Likes

Eine interessante Frage.

Technisch gesehen, müsste man doch nur den idle-Verbrauch der beiden Kernsorten vergleichen. Denn sobald Leistung gefordert wird, läuft der Prozess sowieso auf den P-Cores. E-Cores machen (abseits von Anwendungen die alle cores hart rannehmen die nich bei 3 auf den Bäumen sind) sonst ja nur Windows internes Hintergrundgedudel.

Man sollte immer bedenken, dass diese Kernmonster heutzutage nur sehr selten wirklich mal unter Vollast laufen. Außerhalb von Benchmarks sehe ich bei meiner CPU nie die 200W.

Ich vermute, dass die Unterschiede im Desktopbetrieb im Bereich der Vernachlässigbarkeit liegen.

Ich gebe Dir Recht: die wenigsten Nutzer werden sich die Mühe machen ihr System von Hand zu optimieren und stundenlanges testen + evtl. Instabilitäten in Kauf nehmen nur um 10-20W zu sparen. Ich hab auch nur einen "primitiven" quick&dirty Overclock drin, weil ich da 5000+ sehen wollte. :'D

Antwort Gefällt mir

N
Novasun

Veteran

124 Kommentare 75 Likes

@arcDaniel Globalfoundries geht es besser denn je. Ihre Entscheidung im Wettrennen nicht mehr mit zu machen zahlt sich aus. Die Produzieren inzwischen für die Industrie.

Antwort Gefällt mir

arcDaniel

Urgestein

1,657 Kommentare 916 Likes

finde ich gut, Frage mich nur was und für wen sie im Moment fertigen. Kann ja sehr weit gehen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Samir Bashir

Werbung

Werbung