Basics Editor's Desk Measuring instruments and tools Pro Reviews Technology

Infrared measurement: facts, fake or only colourful hocus-pocus? The bitter truth behind many “thermal images” and the simple reasons

In view of the “measurements” with thermal imaging cameras or equivalent smartphones that have appeared again and again lately, I want to bring last year’s article forward again today to show you the complexity of the matter and to explain why measurement is not the same as colorful imaging. One can “measure” more than one really experiences in facts, if the most important rules and basics are permanently disregarded.

It’s a bit like when the first laser printers were introduced to the PC: everyone suddenly thinks they are a trained graphic designer and simply designs their own flyers and brochures. The products of such overconfidence still adorn many a snack bar today, and the easy-to-use technology, including software, tempts even laymen to think they are little Michelangelos. With thermography and non-contact measurement it is unfortunately no different and so unfortunately almost everyone takes the colorful little pictures presented on YouTube with so-called infrared images far too seriously, although they are actually only thermal snapshots without any accuracy. I would like to dispel these myths today, because many such publications put what is in itself a very good measuring method in a completely false light.

What is that supposed to be? Fake facts from the smartphone (Source: YouTube)

Important preface

It is not the technique itself that is inaccurate or inappropriate, it is almost always the equipment and the basic knowledge of the user that fails! This is not meant to be a scolding of colleagues or a devaluation of the tools used, but to be fair we have to distinguish between a simple thermal image for information purposes (e.g. searching for hotspots or thermal and cold bridges) and a real measurement that really deserves its name. Everything else is fraud on the reader or viewer and ultimately on oneself. Infrared cameras versus infrared scanners? I’ll explain the difference to you today!

Yes, it really is rotationally necessary once again to explain the difference between methodical and pre-planned work, and simply “pointing” with cheap handheld or IR cell phone snapper. All too often the results of inaccurate infrared recordings are sold as measurements and irrefutable facts, which unfortunately have nothing to do with reality. It doesn’t matter whether you measure graphics cards, processors, mainboards or entire devices such as notebooks or game consoles – the basics and mistakes made are always the same.

This time, of course, it’s all based on a certain event on YouTube, because I’m always annoyed how thoughtlessly people handle the IR measurement on a Playstation 5 (picture above), for example, and usually overestimate themselves grandiosely. Reach is no guarantee of quality, but in the end everyone has exactly the audience they deserve. Shitstorm included.

Thermography – Important basics explained simply

I’m deliberately making it simple for you and breaking the basics down to the bare essentials, because not all of you are technicians. I can’t spare you a bit of theory to understand the whole thing, but it can (hopefully) be done in a reasonably entertaining way. Therefore, let’s start simple and first look back into the past. It is the year 1800 and the musician and astronomer Wilhelm Herschel (1738-1822) is in a bad mood. That’s when he decides to interrupt his current experiment and go out for a bite to eat first, because there were no delivery services yet.

Herschel was a good observer and his telescopes are still known today as well as his important discoveries in the field of astronomy. But what does all this have to do with today’s infrared measurement technology? Herschel is testing something very special on this sunny morning. He lets light shine through a prism and thus conjures up a kind of rainbow on the work table. He uses the white light, thus broken down into its individual spectral ranges, to place a thermometer in each of the visible color sections to measure the different intensities of the thermal radiation. But research makes you hungry, as we all know, and so before leaving the room he puts the thermometers back in the stand, which happens to be just below the red area, and goes to lunch in a hurry.

(Illustration by Vilmos Thernesz based on the original figure in Herschel, W., 1800: “Experiments on the refrangibility of the invisible rays of the Sun” Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. London 90, 284-292)

When he comes back and, purely by chance, takes a look at the thermometers, he can’t believe his eyes: he can read values that are significantly higher than what he had just measured in the visible spectrum! So there had to be something outside this spectrum and below the red border area, which cannot be seen but can be measured and felt: The infrared area. And so, in the end, a love of order, hunger and good powers of observation are the rather accidental trigger for a completely new technique.

But what exactly did Herschel see? If we take a quick look at the following diagram, we can see that there are still large areas both below and above the visible light that can only be detected by measurements, because our eyes are simply not suitable for this. Today, however, we are only interested in the longer-wave range below red light, which is why it is also called the infrared range. The hard radiation up to the gamma range we push aside mentally simply times.

© Optris GmbH

Aha, good old thermal radiation then! You can feel it (always appreciated) – indirectly or directly with occasional ouch effects – and of course measure it. Normal thermometers actually need direct contact, but we can’t just shove mum’s mercury thermometer into the graphics card. Therefore, non-contact measurement always plays a role when direct contact via sensors and the like is not possible or expedient. Let’s remember that, please.

I have often used the term spectrum, but what does it mean? In the end, it is nothing more than the intensity of a mixture of electromagnetic waves as a function of wavelength or frequency. All in all, it covers an immense wavelength range of about 23 powers of ten(!), but differs in individual sections by the origin, generation and application of the radiation. It is the same, however, that all types of this radiation are subject to similar laws concerning, for example, diffraction, refraction, reflection and polarization. But more about this on the next pages with the measurement errors, but please remember these laws, because this is exactly where almost everyone quickly makes glaring errors without knowing it!

The actual infrared spectral range extends from the lower end of the visible spectral range (about 0.78 μm) to beyond wavelengths of 1000 μm. For our infrared temperature measurement, however, only the wavelength range from 0.7 to 14 μm is relevant, since the energy quantities outside this range are simply too low to be detected by commercially available sensors. Which brings us elegantly back to the real infrared camera I use.

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

RedF

Urgestein

4,645 Kommentare 2,542 Likes

Das IR-Kamera Messungen nicht ohne sind war mir bekannt. Jetzt weiß ich auch warum : ).

Danke für den Artikel.

Antwort 1 Like

S
SpiritWolf448

Veteran

120 Kommentare 33 Likes

Toller und informativer Artikel, und das am frühen Morgen. Das ist doch mal eine schöne Art, in die Woche zu starten. :love:

Danke dafür, Igor. (y)

Antwort 2 Likes

D
Deridex

Urgestein

2,210 Kommentare 846 Likes

Das ist eigentlich recht weit vom "bunten Hokuspokus" entfernt.

Nur gilt bei der Thermografie noch mehr die Grundregel beim Messen:

Man muss immer beachten was genau man eigentlich misst und welchen Einfluss die Messung selbst hat.

Antwort Gefällt mir

ipat66

Urgestein

1,349 Kommentare 1,348 Likes

Gutes Video !!
Schöne Zusammenfassung Deines letzten Exkurses über dieses Thema.
Die halbe Stunde ging rum wie im Flug.

Ich muss auch immer grinsen,wenn Smartphonebesitzer über ihre verbauten Objektive sprechen....

Witziges Shirt...:)

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,158 Kommentare 18,733 Likes

Und genau deshalb ist das, was die kleinen Wunderkisten beim falschen Adressaten suggerieren, wirklich nur Hokuspokus. Für Unterwegs, wenn man mal Hotspots an einer PV-Anlage suchen muss, ist so ein CAT mit FLIR-Wärmesucher faktisch unersetzlich. Aber messen kann man damit wirklich nichts. :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

g
goch

Veteran

470 Kommentare 179 Likes

Ganz toller Artikel! Es ist immer schön, auch mal einen tieferen Einblick hinter die Test-Kulissen zu bekommen.

Vor allem aber, in einem aktuellen Artikel (kein Retro!) einmal wieder etwas von "VGA Auflösung (640 x 480 Pixel)" als hochauflösend zu lesen, ist doch mal eine schöne Erinnerung an unterschiedliche Perspektiven zum Wochenstart.

Antwort 1 Like

Megaone

Urgestein

1,740 Kommentare 1,642 Likes

Wie war der Filmtitel nochmal?

Denn sie wissen nicht, was sie tun! ;-)

Antwort 1 Like

Mr. Self Destruct

Mitglied

19 Kommentare 6 Likes

Vielleicht sollte man hier auch nochmal klarstellen, dass man keine Rückschlüsse von der Messung eines Bauteils auf die Temperatur eines anderen Bauteils machen darf. Beispiel Wärmebild eines heißeren CPU-Kühlers bedeutet nicht zwangsläufig eine heißere CPU
Siehe dazu auch das Video vom Gamers Nexus When Thermal Cameras Shouldn't Be Used (PS5, Xbox, CPU Coolers, & Cases)
Da spielen viele ebenso viele Faktoren und Missverständnisse mit rein.

Antwort Gefällt mir

D
Deridex

Urgestein

2,210 Kommentare 846 Likes

Btw: Mir wurde mal erklärt, dass man mindestens eine Fläche von 3x3px braucht um in der Mitte davon einen verwendbaren Wert zu bekommen.

@Mr. Self Destruct
Man muss halt wissen was man misst (Die Temperatur an der Oberfläche stellenweise auch lackiert usw.) und was nicht (Junction Temperatur usw.)

Antwort Gefällt mir

v
vonXanten

Urgestein

802 Kommentare 335 Likes

Sehr schöner Artikel!

Leider interessieren sich viele nicht einmal für einfache Grundlagen und Vertrauen allem was so angezeigt wird blind (egal ob das Sinn macht oder nicht) steht ja da und Fehler macht ja keiner.
Wenn es dann noch ein wenig komplizierter wird, ohje.
Habe in der letzten Woche die Frage bekommen: "Wozu benötigt man eine Fehlerbetrachtung, bei der Aufnahme von Messwerten?" 😭
Vllt wäre da Igors Artikel genau das Richtige + im Nachgang dann eine Zusammenfassung in eigenen Worten. Da es auch ein Video gibt, aber das ist über 10min, solange reicht dann die Aufmerksamkeit bei 90% nicht.

@Megaone ist der Kassenschlager an den Lehranstalten 😑 wobei Doppel e passender wäre... Mit dem was Sie nicht wissen, können noch 3 durchfallen.

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,158 Kommentare 18,733 Likes

Unser Prof meinte immer zu solchen Spezis:
Mit Ihrem Wissen können Sie gern auch als diplomierte Ostseeboje anfangen. Sie sind so hohl, dass Sie mit Sicherheit nie untergehen werden... 💪😜👍

Antwort 5 Likes

RedF

Urgestein

4,645 Kommentare 2,542 Likes

Bin da etwas uninformiert in meiner Blase.
Welches Video war der Auslöser?

Der Käse König?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,158 Kommentare 18,733 Likes
v
vonXanten

Urgestein

802 Kommentare 335 Likes

@Igor Wallossek der ist auch gut, aber Ostsee wäre zu weit weg.
Aber in der Elbe gibt es ja auch welche! 🥴

Antwort Gefällt mir

Alkbert

Urgestein

930 Kommentare 705 Likes

Gut, dass ich nix messen, sondern nur gucken muss und für den Entschluss dass ich neue Fenster brauche hat schon meine Flir one gereicht.

Antwort 3 Likes

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,454 Kommentare 817 Likes

Sehr guter Artikel, und auch das Video kann ich empfehlen! Wieder was gelernt. Danke, solche Hintergrund Artikel sind immer noch ein Grund, hier oft vorbeizuschauen.

Antwort 1 Like

N
Name

Mitglied

75 Kommentare 14 Likes

Vielen Dank für die gute Erklärung der Grundsätze. Einmal für mich persönlich super und auch echt hilfreich um andere Leute in aussichtslosen Diskussion auf deinen Artikel zu verweisen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

DrWandel

Mitglied

79 Kommentare 61 Likes

Vielen Dank für den Artikel und das Video. Besonders gut gefallen hat mir der historische Exkurs in Richtung Herschel. Wenn Physiklehrer in der Oberstufe so toll und anschaulich erklären könnten, hätten wir vermutlich weniger Probleme mit dem MINT-Nachwuchs (kein Thema bei mir selbst - hatte Phsyik-Leistungskurs und bin Ingenieur).

Antwort Gefällt mir

B
Besterino

Urgestein

6,704 Kommentare 3,301 Likes

Bei uns an der Schule ist die MINT-AG sehr gut besucht (überbucht)...

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung