Basics GPUs Graphics Practice Reviews

Smoldering Headers on NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 4090 – New Insights, Measurements and (Un)known Causes of the 12VHPWR and 12V-2×6 Issue | Update

Today’s article is the result of several months of laboratory work, extensive measurement series, development work, and constant cross-checking. The matter of the 12-volt connectors is unfortunately so complex that I had to look for a new approach to complete the picture. And no, there isn’t THE one cause, but always a causal chain of several factors. That is what ultimately makes it so difficult, but at the same time, it’s a challenge to do more than just wildly speculate. And interestingly, my first articles on the topic almost seamlessly fit into what I have added new today.

Important Preface and Definition of Terms

This time I didn’t take the easy way out because it would be completely unfair to blame the user alone for destroyed hardware. When one has the ability to track the changes of the PCI SIG and the switch from the 12VHPWR to the 12V-2×6 connector, including all the detailed annotations, can use contacts with connector manufacturers, and also has precise measurement capabilities, a very interesting, completely new picture emerges. Because there are also causes of failure of this connection that have not been considered, in which the supposedly “stupid” user is only a small part of the truth.

The fact is that manufacturing tolerances, material, and overall quality of workmanship form a certain focus of the problem. And it has become clear after now more than 50 defects examined here in the lab that almost always a combination of several causes has led to total failure, not just one. Even if the story of incapable users just before NVIDIA’s announcement of quarterly results suited the provider (quite coincidentally), it helps no one, not even NVIDIA, as it was probably a hasty rush job.

This whole story is so complex that one must be very careful with attributions of blame. And so, for weeks, I have also been examining a component that has, strangely enough, hardly been written or speculated about. The supposed “socket” that sits on the graphics card is actually, technically speaking, a male connector with the male pins. What we then plug into it is actually a socket, because the spring contacts represent the female parts of the connection. Therefore, I will consistently use “header” when referring to the part with the pins on the graphics card and the counterpart to be plugged in, as “cable plug,” as the PCI SIG does. And even though both together actually constitute a clamping plug connection, I will simply refer to it as “connector” for the sake of simplicity.

Differences between CEM 5.0 and CEM 5.1 and New Details

The PCI SIG and its participants seem to have gone through a continuous “learning by doing” process concerning certain details. To avoid user errors, they now use retracted sense pins and forward-extended power pins to create more contact surface. This may be helpful if the user does not possess special skills for plugging in, but that is known and NOT the topic today. I will summarize these other things at the end to complete the picture. So today, it will primarily be about the pins on the graphics card header and not about what the user exactly plugs in there. First, let’s look at the older CEM 5.0 and the 12VHPWR header in its original form:

We see that the 12 pins (6 for 12 volts and 6 for ground) are each specified as square with 0.64 mm outer length or height. The tolerances for this detail are completely missing (and not only for this). That can quickly become a problem, but now let’s take a look at the current version of the headers on the graphics cards:

Well, what a coincidence! Now they have also set the tolerances, which have been constantly demanded (not only by me), that apply to the dimensions of the pins! However, important details such as the twisting, the radii of the edges (which are not round), as well as the position tolerance are still missing. For the latter, according to the drawing, a very generous 0.2 mm would be set, which can definitely be a source of error. But more on that in a moment. But we also see that it’s not only the type of spring contacts (whether Astron or NTK) that matters, but also the actual clamping area resulting from the pins and their size and positioning, as well as possibly insufficient contact pressure! By clamping area, we mean the area where the intended current flow can actually take place, and unfortunately, this area is still missing in all documentation, as is the prescribed contact pressure. Here, unfortunately, each connector manufacturer cooks its own soup, and one runs against a wall of silence.

One must not forget: With the now established tolerance range for the pins, these may have a side length between 0.62 and 0.66 mm for a specification of 0.64 mm. But this includes the absolute ideal case that these pins are absolutely rectangular and also always completely straight. Just by the production (usually a punch and die process), a slight twist can occur. This is not bad per se if you calculate the tolerances for it and the socket with the female contacts has been designed for it. However, this does not seem to be the case at the moment, as the PCI SIG’s new specifications suggest.

 

Update and Technical Note for Outsiders

A positional tolerance of 0.2 mm relative to 2 axes means that you are allowed a maximum deviation of 0.07 mm per axis. Why is this the case? Such tolerances are squared per axis. But then the question arises how connector manufacturers can implement this: Can they really work so precisely in a process-capable manner? You may believe it, but you don’t have to. What are actually missing from the drawings of the PCI SIG are the following dimensions:

  1. The perpendicularity of the pins relative to reference C
  2. The parallelism of the pin surfaces to A and B (regarding twist)
  3. The flatness or surface contour of the pin clamping surfaces (concerning camber)
  4. Edge break specifications (radii on the pins)
  5. The minimum clamping surface for the Cable Plug (minimum opening dimension in the unclamped state), ensuring the clamping or contact surface for electrical current flow.1

I had already written the rest. Furthermore, one should really consider whether it is possible to move from the classic ABC reference system to a symmetric dimensioning system. It’s perfectly acceptable that the dimensions of the part to be inserted are made tighter, as this prevents any jamming. However, the general omission of everything concerning the spring contacts has been retained. Personally, I find this dangerous because it can certainly introduce new potential sources of error. I have conducted numerous test series and have also checked the materials and surfaces. It’s somewhat disheartening that some manufacturers are not very precise with tolerances or consistently operate at the very lowest end of what is permissible. When you take third-party products like the CableMod adapter or even the header soldered onto defective cards by KrisFix, both the cable plug and the respective headers align exactly with the standard values of CEM 5.1, WITHOUT fully exploiting the tolerances to the downside.

Update (2) and Positional Tolerances

Thanks to Fritz Hunter for the rapid graphics that highlight the nonsense with these positional tolerances once more and calculate that with such specifications, even clamping connectors can be a possibility (click to enlarge):

 

Test system and test objects for the measurement

It has always been the case that testers have primarily focused on the outer burnt contacts when it came to defects and severe criticism. But at least since users have been sensitized to properly inserting and angling the cables, the picture has changed slightly. For the following comparison, I found a total of four different types from which I could make little piles with the defective headers available to me. In this context, it’s also interesting to note the pattern of failure at the bottom of the headers and the backside. Most of the headers in my “corpse” collection are so-called inverse headers, like those used by Asus (but not exclusively). With this variant, the locking latch and the 4 sense pins face away from the board, effectively upwards. And it is these headers that I will use for the following examinations because I have the most of them. A bit of statistics and reproducibility can never hurt.

The Keyence VHX-7000 system coupled with the AE-300 from my own lab is a versatile 3D profilometer, and the powerful microscope (max. x2000) can also be used perfectly for such examinations with its HDR function, automated lighting scenarios, and immense depth of field. Furthermore, it serves for material analysis, for which I do not have to use a complex SEM + EDX. Vacuum? I don’t need that anymore, and it saves a lot of time. As long as one knows what one is getting into and where the limits of the used method lie, it really works well. That’s exactly what we need today as well.

 

399 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

big-maec

Urgestein

819 Kommentare 474 Likes

Danke erstmal für die kostenlose Analyse des 12VHPWR, habe auch noch 5 Header hier herumliegen, müsste mal schauen, ob die dann überhaupt was taugen.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Roland83

Urgestein

663 Kommentare 501 Likes

Traurig das ganze, weil das eigentlich jedem mit etwas Hausverstand und zumindest 2-3 versch Steckern und einfachsten Messwerkzeugen in 30 Minuten klar sein muss das man sich hier absolut beim Design und den Anforderungen verrannt hat.
Nichts anderes habe ich ja schon bei meinen Kontaktflächen Messungen bei den ersten 2 verschiedenen Kabeln, Adaptern.. die ich persönlich zu Hause hatte festgestellt. Das ganze ist am oberen Ende so heikel, dass es nur regelmäßig schief gehen kann wenn auch nur an 1-2 Punkten der Kette geschludert wird.
Trotzdem danke das du hier nicht locker lässt und das so offen und umfangreich darlegst.
Ich werde trotzdem dabei bleiben und meinen "Kunden" keine Karten über 350W TDP mit dieser Stecker/Buchsen Kombi verbauen.
Das darf dann jeder selber und auf eigenen Gefahr erledigen :p

Antwort Gefällt mir

echolot

Urgestein

906 Kommentare 705 Likes

Danke für die nochmalige Bestätigung, dass die Welt so eine Sch..Steckverbindung nicht braucht.

View image at the forums

Wenn dann so etwas dabei rauskommt, dann fragt man sich was die all die Jahre vorher richtig gemacht haben. Es waren auch Steckklemmverbindungen. Aber nicht an der physikalischen Grenze und mit reichlich Reserve. Back to the roots!

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,155 Kommentare 18,727 Likes

Vielleicht sollte man ja mal die tolle AI nutzen, um DEN perfekten Stecker zu entwerfen :D

Antwort 6 Likes

Gregor Kacknoob

Urgestein

524 Kommentare 442 Likes

Trifft für mich den Nagel auf den Kopf. Man müsste wohl nach jedem Einstecken ein Benchmark laufen lassen und dabei die Temperatur der Steckverbindung einmal prüfen, um wirklich auf der sicheren Seite zu sein. Klingt sarkastisch, aber nützt ja nichts ^^

Edit:
Und lässt AI die Qualitätskontrolle übernehmen. Was kann da schon schiefgehen :whistle:

Antwort Gefällt mir

R
RazielNoir

Veteran

323 Kommentare 107 Likes

Warum wird am MB und Grafikkarten keine Steckverbindung über flache Metallbahnkontakte und Federleisten verwendet? Sowas wie der SATA-Stromstecker in GROSS? Mechanisch ist die Steckverbindung ja ähnlich wie die alten 4-Pin Molex Stecker und die haben mich immer schon geärgert! Und am MB die Aufteilung in 24Pin und 4 Pin an 2 verschieden Positionen....

Antwort 1 Like

Roland83

Urgestein

663 Kommentare 501 Likes

Ich fürchte der reine Entwurf an sich ist nicht das Thema. Aber wir sind ja heute alle sehr Serviceorientiert und die Anforderungen der verwöhnten Kundschaft sind halt dementsprechend hochtrabend...
"He Sirilexa - konstruiere mir eine Steckverbindung für 1000W, die soll aber Luios Viutton Weiß sein, maximal 3 Quadratmillimeter groß und mit ARGB Beleuchtung"
Dann müsste man eigentlich höflich formuliert die Antwort erhalten sich doch bitte auf die nächste Toliette zu begeben...
Aber weil die Manager, Marketing und Kunden halt immer König sind und ein einfaches "Heast Deppada des geht ned" heute nicht mehr Gesellschaftsfähig ist nimmt der Wahnsinn seinen Lauf xD

Antwort 2 Likes

Xandros

Mitglied

10 Kommentare 7 Likes

Vielen Dank für diese aufschlussreiche Untersuchungsreihe !
Die Tatsache dass mittlerweile, angesichts der fließenden Ströme, grenzwertig kleine Kontaktflächen und Querschnitte genutzt werden war bereits bedenklich genug. Nun aber auch noch an den, wie du so schön schreibst, Grenzen des physikalisch vertretbaren zu schlampen oder die Spezifizierungen ausdrücklich unscharf zu lassen, erscheint mir als beinahe vorsätzlich eingepflegte Sollbruchstelle.

Es wird schon seine Gründe gehabt haben, warum man die drei 12V-Leitungen auf den PCIe-8Pin-Kabeln samt Kontakten auf maximal je nominal 3x 50W bzw. 5,5A an 12V, also 66W limitiert hat. Soweit hat es damit wohl nie ernsthafte Probleme gegeben. Letztlich wurde die Stromdichte pro Kabel/Kontakt beim 12VHPWR schlicht verdoppelt (Dauerleistung 6x100W), wodurch Übergangswiderstände eine zunehmende Rolle spielen.

Einen schönen Tag allen Foristen

Antwort Gefällt mir

echolot

Urgestein

906 Kommentare 705 Likes

Wir reden hier über 1 kW. Das ist nicht der Rede wert. Dafür gibt es zig Lösungen. Warum wählt man dann so eine grauenvolle Worst-Case-Ausführung? Es ist ja nicht so, dass die Verbindung jeden Tag unterbrochen wird. In einem GPU-Leben vielleicht 20 mal.

Antwort 2 Likes

ssj3rd

Veteran

214 Kommentare 142 Likes

Denke damit ist das Thema auch hier (endlich!) mal durch. 🙏

Ansonsten berichtet auch keiner wirklich mehr darüber, dass Thema scheint tot zu sein, selbst bei Reddit ist da inzwischen kaum noch was los. 🥱

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,155 Kommentare 18,727 Likes

ChatGPT Konzept für einen wirklich sicheren 12V-Steckverbinder, Das hat was :D

View image at the forums

Antwort 19 Likes

Igor Wallossek

1

10,155 Kommentare 18,727 Likes

Ging nicht schneller... :D

Antwort Gefällt mir

J
JahJah192

Mitglied

31 Kommentare 16 Likes

Toller und wichtiger Artikel, danke dafür!

Finde es absurd das Nvidia gerade bei den gigantischen 4090 Klopper so einen kleinen Stecker nutzt. Die Dinger werden immer größer und die Stecker immer kleiner…da wäre auch noch platz für einen zweiten Anschluss und weniger Grenzbereich gewesen.
Hab bei meiner Suprim penibel genau darauf geachtet das Teil gerade reinzustecken bis es einrastet, schlechte Gefühl bleibt, insbesondere wenn man dann sowas liest.
mMn eine der dümmsten, weil gefährlichsten, Designentscheidungen überhaupt. Muss nicht sein.

Antwort 5 Likes

echolot

Urgestein

906 Kommentare 705 Likes
RaptorTP

Veteran

317 Kommentare 153 Likes

Mega !
Ich bin da auch völlig bei dir Igor.
Hab zwar schon eine RTX 4070 hier im Hause. Aber natürlich die aus deiner Empfehlung (KFA2) und dem guten alten 8pin !

Ich würde sagen Thema ist durch.
Wenn, dann sollte es ein Artikel für eine Alternative samt Umlöt-Anleitung geben xD

Das würde ich sogar präventiv eher machen als das mir die Karte abschmort und der Hersteller sowieso dann sagt ich seie zu blöd den fragilen Stecker, dessen Design fragwürdig ist, einzustecken.

Antwort 1 Like

Nulight

Veteran

220 Kommentare 141 Likes

Der Stecker hätte doch einfach nur 50% in allen Abmessungen größer sein müssen, ca die Gesamtgröße von zwei alten 6Pin Steckern nebeneinander.
Mehr Platz, mehr Fläche, mehr Querschnitt, läuft.

Antwort 2 Likes

Arnonymious

Veteran

190 Kommentare 72 Likes

Toller Hintergrundartikel zu einem immer noch leidigen Thema.

@RaptorTP : Wenn einem die Garantie Wumpe ist, kann man das sicher machen, das sollte keine Hexerei sein. Derzeit habe ich das Problem trotz RTX nicht und hoffe, dass sich das bis zum nächsten Upgrade erledigt hat, egal welcher Couleur mein nächstes Pixelschübserchen sein wird.

Antwort 1 Like

c
cunhell

Urgestein

546 Kommentare 500 Likes

Warten wir mal ab, was passiert, wenn die 4090 und die anderen Karten, die den Stecker verwenden in den Second-Hand-Pool kommen.
So mancher wird dann wohl noch so seine Überraschung erleben. Gerade die leicht beschädigten Teile könnten beim erneuten Zusammenbauen dann ggf. Probleme machen, selbst wenn sie im Betrieb des Erstkäufers unauffällig waren.
Und da ja viele die Ursache einzig beim User sahen und auch so manche Hardwareseite diese Ursache als gegeben ansah, kommt dann die Aussage, der Zweitkäufer wäre zu doof gewesen und hätte den Stecker falsch bedient.

Cunhell

Antwort 3 Likes

echolot

Urgestein

906 Kommentare 705 Likes

Ich gehe davon aus, dass man den Platz für den Header in Relation zur Platinengröße verkleinert hat. Bei AMD hat sich da nichts geändert.

View image at the forums

View image at the forums

Antwort 2 Likes

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung