CPU Motherboard Reviews

Extensive workstation and AI test with Intel’s i9-13900K – The power profiles Baseline, Performance, Extreme and Insane from reasonable to pointless in practice

After we published Aris’ article about the power consumption of the Core i9-13900K in Cinebench 23 on Monday, I’m following up today with a larger program scope. And yes, I’m deliberately using a Z690 board because I also used it for the launch of Raptor Lake S and the subsequent refresh. That makes the comparison much easier. And as I already teased on Sunday: Intel’s half-hearted revelation with the new profiles for the Z790 boards also pissed me off a bit. When I explicitly asked an employee responsible for motherboards at a major Taiwanese manufacturer, all I got was a bored As of now, we only have “Intel Default Settings” for some Z790 models. When I asked why the whole thing was still dragging on, the answer was a terse Intel doesn’t have an official information about the root cause yet. Aha, no cause, no updates. So the rest is just cosmetic. Well…

Lately, people have been writing about Intel’s possible degradation problems with the high-end CPUs of the 13th and 14th generation and I’m sick and tired of all these discussions. Since I’m not interested in the rather useless gaming crown anyway, because I play almost exclusively in Ultra HD, where the CPU is of secondary importance, I’ve chosen the area where the mainstream doesn’t test: the workstation and AI area. And because some tests run for a very, very long time and involve a lot of load changes, stability is all the more important here. I also very reluctantly remember the Core i7-14700K from the launch article, which didn’t even run stably without overpowering. That was practically degradation out of the box. I have no idea where the part ended up after I returned it.

Performance profiles

I’m going to be mean today and test two profiles that Intel no longer wants to see. So there are now four. The so-called Baseline profile with 188 watts, which was still the standard in the first slides before the Raptor Lake launch, the so-called Performance profile (now “Intel Recommended”), the Extreme profile for the heating technicians among us and the completely stupid “Insane” profile of the motherboard suppliers with the no less insane 4096 watts as a placeholder for the infinite expanses of overclocking space.

And I can already spoil the fact that only two profiles are actually suitable for practical use. The move that Intel would now prefer to hide the baseline profile as “n/a” is probably also due to the fact that not every older Core i9-13900K still runs stably with it after all the energetic kicks in recent months. I deliberately didn’t use Intel’s Golden Sample for today’s test, but rather my own purchased retail model, whose average clock rates were somewhat lower in practice.

Intel Core i9-13900K (14900K) Baseline Performance Extreme “Insane”
Base performance of the processor 125 125 125 125
PL1 125 125 253 4096
PL2 188 253 253 4096
Iccmax 249 307 400 512

Intel therefore recommends implementing the highest power supply profile that is compatible with each individual motherboard design, not entirely without ulterior motives. What a nonsense, because I still pay for my electricity. As you’ll see from my test results, the baseline profile does affect performance from time to time, but I wouldn’t call it unusable. As long as the CPU runs stably with it, it’s a real alternative. Just not for blind marketing. I took the remaining settings from Intel’s slide, unless they were already set by default. And since the Z690 Unify used was not doped with pointless settings, customers should still be on the safe side in many respects. Things like CEP and eTVB limit are of course set as Intel would like them to be.

Test system and methodology

Let’s take a brief look at the test system, which offers no secrets. The power consumption measurement is carried out as usual using a high-resolution oscilloscope and the measuring clamps, but this time deliberately on the 8-pin EPS. I use this to measure BEFORE the voltage converters, whose maximum losses of 8 percent we still have to include here. However, I do this deliberately in order to remain comparable with Aris and also to record the actual load on the power supply unit.

Environment/laboratory Ambient temperature: 22°C ±1°C
Motherboard MSI MEG Z690 Unify
CPU Intel Coire i9-13900K
GPU KFA2 GeForce RTX 4090 SG
NVMe MSI Spatium M580 FrozR 4 TB
MEMORY TForce DDR5 6000
Power supply Be Quiet! Dark Power Pro 13
CPU cooler Be Quiet! Pure Loop 360 (Fan Speed max.)
Case Bykski Benchtable

Although I used a powerful cooling solution to test how high the Intel CPU can run when all restrictions are lifted, I deliberately refrained from using a custom loop solution with the IKA lab chiller for reasons of practical relevance. This should also cover over 90% of configurations. I have also dispensed with air cooling for the energetic Nimmersatt, as I don’t want to organize a BBQ.

 

120 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

echolot

Urgestein

998 Kommentare 761 Likes

Mal unabhängig von dem Wattwahnsinn. Was empfiehlt man da für ein Netzteil bei einer mittelprächtigen GPU ala RTX 4070 Ti oder RTX 7900 XT? Oder gar einer RTX 4090 am Limit?

View image at the forums

Antwort Gefällt mir

H
HabeLeiderKeinLabor

Veteran

117 Kommentare 110 Likes

Wir hatten bis anhin häufiger Abstürze in Twinmotion auf unseren 13900K und seltener auch auf unseren 13700K. Sind an die 20 Computer.

Nach dem BIOS Update von Asus welches laut changelog "The update introduces the Intel Baseline Profile option" einführt, dachte ich diese Intel Baseline wäre nun der Default. Das ist aber nicht so!
Das Wort "Intel Baseline" kommt im ganzen BIOS nicht einmal vor. Auch ASUS Multicore enhancement ist per default auf Auto.

Nachdem wir nun Asus Multicore auf
"Disabled, enforce all limits"
und SVID auf
"Intel failsafe"
umgeschaltet haben, sind die Abstürze verschwunden.

Danke für die Benchmarks, die meine Gefühl bestätigen:
Ein echte Leistungseinbusse ist (für unseren workload) nicht vorhanden.

Antwort 2 Likes

B
Besterino

Urgestein

6,817 Kommentare 3,395 Likes

Danke. Muss ich also doch nochmal ins BIOS krabbeln und an den Settings fummeln. Mist.

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,301 Kommentare 19,090 Likes

Rechne alle Wattfresser zusammen und multipliziere mit 1.5, um völlig sicher zu sein oder nimm gleich ATX 3.x

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,301 Kommentare 19,090 Likes

Lohnt sich aber sicher.

Antwort Gefällt mir

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,558 Kommentare 885 Likes

Also verhält sich RL genau wie erwartet - vernünftig eingestellt laufen die gut und nicht hart am Rand der Kernschmelze. Danke an @Igor Wallossek für das Testen aller 4 Profile in den Anwendungen, denn jetzt kann man's ja nachlesen. Daß "insane setting" dann genau das ist (verrückt) überrascht zwar nicht, aber wie weit die Unvernunft hier ging bzw geht ist schon beeindruckend (und deprimierend).

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,301 Kommentare 19,090 Likes
LurkingInShadows

Urgestein

1,372 Kommentare 572 Likes

kannte ich nur als qed

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,301 Kommentare 19,090 Likes

Es geht auch Deutsch statt Latein. Unser Mathelehrer legte da sehr großen Wert drauf. :D

Antwort 2 Likes

P
Pokerclock

Veteran

460 Kommentare 382 Likes

Ich bin mittlerweile ganz froh darum die ganzen i9er bei mir in den Mietsystemen immer mit 307A ICCmax und PL1/PL2 253 Watt eingetellt zu haben. Da hätte ich ja mal überhaupt keine Lust dazu, die (zurecht) angenervten Reklamationen meiner Kunden entgegennehmen zu müssen, weil die CPUs ihren langsamen Tod sterben. Vor allem würde man daran überhaupt gar nicht denken und andere Komponenten vermuten.

Ändern werde ich daran auch nichts, denn unterschiedliche PL1/PL2 sagen mir im Sinne einer konsistenten und damit nachvollziehbaren Leistung mehr zu. Gibt nichts Schlimmeres als verwirrte Kunden, die sich Fragen, warum der PC nach 56 Sekunden immer langsamer wird...

Man sieht auch ganz schön, dass lang andauernde Volllastszenarien mit gängigen Kühlmethoden überhaupt gar nicht möglich sind.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Lieblingsbesuch

Veteran

451 Kommentare 80 Likes

Danke für den Test aber warum wurde keine Spiele getestet?

Antwort Gefällt mir

R
RazielNoir

Veteran

399 Kommentare 163 Likes

Das ist ja das Ergebnis dessen, was befeuert von den ganzen OC-Gedöns der letzten Jahre im DIY-Bereich gefeiert wurde. Der Review wurde fast nie mit dem Baselineprofil (wie es jetzt heißt) gemacht. Und die meisten haben immer die -K oder KF/KS Prozessoren getetstet.

Eine Server- oder Workstation-CPU wird nicht getunt, läuft also quasi immer mit den Spezifikationen des Herstellers.
Weil Stabilität und Zuverlässigkeit der Ergebnisse wichtiger als das letzte Promille Mehrleistung.
Das zeigt m.M.n. der schon etwas älter Test des Xeon w9-3495X auf HWLuxx

Daher ist mir ein nativer 10 Kerner nur mit P-Cores bei stabilen 3,7Ghz und 125w Dauerlast lieber als diese Chimären-Cpu's ab Alder Lake.

Antwort Gefällt mir

RX480

Urgestein

1,883 Kommentare 874 Likes

richtig dolle guuut, das Du zeigen konntest, das "Performance" nur 1% ineffizienter als "Baseline" arbeitet (x)

View image at the forums

Das werden schon genügend Andere zeigen.

(x) wird in Games nicht groß anders sein

Antwort Gefällt mir

LurkingInShadows

Urgestein

1,372 Kommentare 572 Likes

Artikel lesen hilft:

Antwort 2 Likes

LurkingInShadows

Urgestein

1,372 Kommentare 572 Likes

Meine meinte immer "Mathematiker sind faule Leute, drum suchen sie immer Abkürzungen, zB Multiplikation statt Kettenaddition" :)

Antwort Gefällt mir

HerrRossi

Urgestein

6,790 Kommentare 2,246 Likes

Intel wollte halt mit allen Mitteln die Gamingkrone holen, bei den min fps hat das ja auch manchmal funktioniert, der Preis ist halt der hohe Stromverbrauch und, wenn man Pech hat, eine kaputte CPU.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Lieblingsbesuch

Veteran

451 Kommentare 80 Likes

Mit dem Insane Profil wird man die Gamingkrone bestimmt behalten können ....

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,301 Kommentare 19,090 Likes

... und gleich noch einschmelzen. :D

Antwort 3 Likes

Lieblingsbesuch

Veteran

451 Kommentare 80 Likes

Aber auch das Insane Profil ist inoffiziell von Intel frei freigeben oder nicht?
Wenn es stabil bei Spielen eingesetzt werden kann, warum nicht damit auch testen ...

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung