CPU GPUs Motherboard Practice PSU Reviews

Ground on the wrong track: Why only certain power connector pins melt and we should rethink PCs | Part 1 of 2

Some things are accidental discoveries and are actually so trivial that nobody even bothers to question the current flows in the PC and, above all, to measure them. We only ever measure the 12-volt rails and are happy. But with connectors such as the 12VHPWR or 12V2x6 over 6+2 pin, the 8-pin EPS and the 24-pin mainboard connection, does exactly the same current flow back to ground as flows in? Not at all, and that’s what really got me triggered!

I was actually looking for the reason why the 12VHPWR connectors only ever burn the 12V pins and, on the other hand, the ground pins of an 8-pin EPS get extremely hot, especially when using powerful (and extremely hungry) graphics cards. I was also working on a completely different article at the same time, which dealt with audible ground loops in PC audio and their elimination, and was somewhat surprised that all the causes could be reduced to a common denominator!

A completely scorched 12V2x6 plug and the well-preserved ground pins

Important preliminary remark

“Ground loops” are nothing new, because electricity is like water and always looks for the easiest and shortest path, even when it flows back. You would never expect to find them where they actually occur. Since the PC case, the type of spacers to the mainboard, the cabling and the power supply unit mounting or the power supply unit itself also play a very important role and there are therefore countless factors and variations, I have very consciously and deliberately mounted today’s experiment on an electrically insulating benchtable. All input and output lines are therefore very easy to compare and measure individually, as there are no additional influences from other earth connections in the housing.

However, you can also test it in the housing and notice that the main points of my current findings and their consequences are still very similar. It is just more difficult to reproduce and generalize. Furthermore, there are of course also different mainboards with very different circuitry, track quality and more or less layers. This and significantly fluctuating temperatures when warming up the boards and graphics cards can of course significantly change the absolute values, but here too it is true that in principle it remains equally unpleasant with the in and out. In order to understand the current, I would like to start with a short anecdote that explains Kirchhoff’s law.

What Mr. Kirchhoff has to do with it

One gloriously sunny afternoon, a certain Mr. Kirchhoff, known for his serious expression and even more serious moustache, decided to take an unusually spontaneous walk along the nearby river. And as he strolled along the bank, with the sun at his back and the gentle lapping of the water as his only company, he began to think about currents. Not about electric currents, oh no, but about the water that flowed so happily past him. In a moment of exhilaration (or was it the heat going to his head?), he began to think of the water and the leaves floating by as electrical charges flowing through an electrical circuit.

“Interesting,” he muttered to himself as he watched a particularly nimble leaf swirl around a rock before continuing on its way. “If I’m seeing this correctly, the river behaves very much like an electrical circuit. The total amount of water, whether before or after the watermill or the parallel weir, that enters here must be exactly the same as the amount that comes out much further back. An eternal balance! I think I’ve just discovered a fundamental principle of electricity – on the banks of a river, mind you!” A law that from then on would not only strike fear into the world of electricity, but also into the hearts of physics students worldwide. And if you listen carefully, you can still hear the quiet giggling of the ducks who were the first to witness how a flowing stream provided the inspiration for one of the fundamental laws of electrophysics.

These Kirchhoff’s laws, also known as Kirchhoff’s rules, refer to two fundamental rules in electrical engineering that are used to analyze currents and voltages in electrical networks. These laws are crucial for understanding and analyzing electrical circuits. There are two main laws, the first of which is of most interest to us today.

  1. Kirchhoff’s current theorem (node point theorem or first Kirchhoff’s rule)
    This law states that in every node of an electrical network (a point where conductors come together), the sum of all currents flowing in is equal to the sum of all currents flowing out. This law is based on the principle of conservation of charge, according to which electrical charge can neither be generated nor destroyed. Electricity can therefore not be consumed.

  2. Kirchhoff’s voltage law (mesh law or second Kirchhoff’s rule)

    This law states that in every closed loop of a network, the sum of all voltage drops (caused by components such as resistors) and the voltages generated by sources must be zero. This means that the algebraic sum of the products of current and resistance plus the sum of the electromotive forces (EMF) in the loop is equal to zero This law follows from the principle of energy conservation in a closed loop.

These two laws are fundamental for circuit analysis, as they make it possible to calculate unknown currents and voltages in complex networks by setting up a system of linear equations that can be solved using linear algebra methods. But we don’t have to make it quite so complicated today, although of course, as always, what you put in must come out. And so we expect that everything that is supplied to the PC on the 12-volt rail also comes back to earth. And it does, but it’s better to measure where and how it all comes back.

 

184 Antworten

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

J
Jan_03

Neuling

4 Kommentare 0 Likes

Muss man sich demnächst sorgen um den PCI Sockel machen? Der kann ja nur 75W, wird aber ja deutlich mit 120W belastet.

Ist ja nur auf der Masse Leitung, nicht auf der + Leitung, funktioniert das dann nur deswegen mit der Erwärmung? Oder kann der Slot doch mehr?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Sci-Man

Veteran

146 Kommentare 93 Likes

War gerade bei gleicher Überlegung.
Meine laienhafte Überlegung dahingend ist, dass es nur wegen der einseitigen Belastung nicht zum überhitzen kommt, also dadurch dass "nur" die Masseseite so stark belastet ist, sich die entstehende Hitze verteilen kann.

Antwort Gefällt mir

RX480

Urgestein

1,885 Kommentare 874 Likes

Wo gehen die Strömlinge dann mit ner 7900er Graka eigentlich hin?
Ist da auch soviel Masse auf dem PCiE-Slot?

.... wenn man mal bedenkt wieviel W da manche Luxxer beim X-OCen drauf hauen

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,406 Kommentare 19,379 Likes

Erstens:
Das ist bei AMD-Grafikkarten nicht anders. Bei manchen sogar noch ausgeprägter.

Zweitens:
Am PCIe Slot gibt es nur 3 offizielle 12V-Pins (mit Reserve-Pin sind es 4), aber deutlich mehr Masse-Pins. So gesehen passt das schon noch. Ich hatte mit einer MSI RTX4090 SUPRIM X und 516 Watt Leistungsaufnahme knapp 13 Ampere am Slot, bei 600 Watt BIOSen sind es sicher 14 bis 15 Ampere. Das ist zwar schon arg sportlich, aber für satte 34 Gnd-Pins noch locker machbar. Ich mache mir da eher Sorgen ums Mutterbrett und die Interferenzen

Antwort 10 Likes

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,641 Kommentare 970 Likes

Interessant! Erdungsanschlüsse (Schraube am Metall Gehäuse zum Anschließen eines Erdung/Ground Kabels) gibt's ja aus guten Gründen in Netzwerk Switches und Routers, zT sogar schon in billigen Geräten (so ab €100, einfach danach suchen). Warum es dann sowas nicht auch für die PCs selbst gibt, weiß ich nicht.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,406 Kommentare 19,379 Likes

Frrag die Industrie. Das gabs früher sogar an Netzteilen (zum Gehäuse).

Antwort 5 Likes

holansensei

Mitglied

63 Kommentare 17 Likes

Guten Morgen,

dies ist mal wieder ein Beweis, wieso ich hier so gerne lese. Ein Artikel über ein Thema, welches kein anderer auf dem Schirm hat und dann noch für mich verständlich präsentiert.

Genug geschleime, sonst bricht sich noch jmd was.

Ich nehme für mich also mit, dass wenn ich die Möglichkeit für 2x4Pin CPU Stecker habe (je nach Konfiguration des MB) auch diese dran stecke?

Nicht wegen Zulauf, sondern Rücklauf?

Antwort 4 Likes

Roland83

Urgestein

706 Kommentare 548 Likes

Heute ist ja bald alles pulverbeschichtet, sogar die Schrauben, also da noch eine zuverlässige Masse abseits der Kabel hinzubekommen grenzt eh schon an Kunst. Die Kunststoff Abstandshalter sind dann die Krönung 🙈

Antwort Gefällt mir

Rizoma

Veteran

184 Kommentare 156 Likes

Sind die Netzteile nicht über die Gehäuseverbindungsschrauben geerdet ?

Antwort Gefällt mir

Roland83

Urgestein

706 Kommentare 548 Likes

Jo mit den pulverbeschichteten Gehäusen (sowohl nt als auch pc ) samt Schrauben . Natürlich wirst du da mit etwas Glück beim eindrehen den ein oder anderen Kontakt finden aber optimal ist anders 😅

Masseverbindungen, Erde, Potential etc.. sollten ja idealwerweise so dimensioniert sein das sie die Gesamtheit des Rückflusses aufnehmen bzw ableiten können ( warum sieht man ja schön an Igors Schema). Drei "angeritzte" Gewindegänge entsprechen dieser Situation vielleicht nicht so ganz.

Antwort 3 Likes

echolot

Urgestein

1,069 Kommentare 821 Likes

Elektrizität zu Ende gedacht! Thema Potentialausgleich. Das Erdungskabel kam mir sofort in den Sinn. Hatte selber auch mal mit einer Soundblaster zu kämpfen. Gibt es von Dir eine DIY Lösung dazu?

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,406 Kommentare 19,379 Likes

Drucke Dir einfach eine Bracket oder nimm Tesa-Film zum Isolieren. Dazu kommt morgen ja das Follow-Up. Auch mit Soundkarte :D

Antwort 3 Likes

Roland83

Urgestein

706 Kommentare 548 Likes

Soundkarten, Erdungsklemmen... wer gestern nach 20 Minuten Ram Training noch dachte AM4 war solide wird morgen den 486er wieder auspacken :LOL:

Antwort Gefällt mir

echolot

Urgestein

1,069 Kommentare 821 Likes

Für den Fall der Fälle einfach mal abwarten was da morgen noch kommt. Ansonsten sehe ich bei meinem Setup momentan keine Probleme.

Antwort Gefällt mir

p
pintie

Veteran

179 Kommentare 132 Likes

An den ganzen Glasscheiben ist nichts mehr frei... da sind schon die ganzen RGB Kontroller geerdet.

Antwort 3 Likes

Roland83

Urgestein

706 Kommentare 548 Likes

Einfach den freien Raum mit 10-20 Liter Gartenerde auffüllen, da reicht auch die günstige aus dem Baumarkt. Es muss nicht die Corsairde Republic of Gardening um 80 Euro das Kilo sein, auch wenn führende Youtuber da die meisten Regenwürmer drinnen gefunden haben wollen ...
Wir verlassen uns da lieber ganz auf Igors künftige Materialanalysen ;)

Antwort 6 Likes

DrWandel

Mitglied

84 Kommentare 69 Likes

Ja, mit den Kirchhoffschen Gesetzen habe ich mich sehr intensiv während meines Studiums der Elektrotechnik befasst, vor sehr langer Zeit. Danke für das passende Bild und die Erläuterungen!

Zum Thema passt perfekt die Benamung des ersten Kapitels: "Unerklärlliche Dinge..." (sic) ;-)

Ich spekuliere mal, dass dieses Thema (Powerstecker für Grafikarten) auch in ein oder zwei Jahren noch aktuell sein wird...

Antwort Gefällt mir

arcDaniel

Urgestein

1,658 Kommentare 918 Likes

Sehr interessanter Artikel, allerings die Geschichte mit dem Wasser... Ja man glaubte lang dass der Strom Vom Plus nach Minus fliesst und auch alle Schaltungen sind so gezeichnet, aucht wird sich dies nicht mehr ändern.
Allerdings fliessen die Elektronen in Wirklichkeit vom Minus auf den Plus.

Antwort 5 Likes

RedF

Urgestein

4,790 Kommentare 2,662 Likes

Also was konnte ich machen um den PEG Slot zu entlasten?
Dickes Kabel direkt zum Netzteil, aber wo an der Graka verbinden.

Antwort 2 Likes

Danke für die Spende



Du fandest, der Beitrag war interessant und möchtest uns unterstützen? Klasse!

Hier erfährst Du, wie: Hier spenden.

Hier kannst Du per PayPal spenden.

About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

Follow Igor:
YouTube Facebook Instagram Twitter

Werbung

Werbung