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Xinfrared XTHERM II T2S Plus Review – affordable semi-professional infrared camera for smartphones and mobile use | Black Friday Offer with 20% off!

The Xinfrared T2S Plus is considered one of the pioneers among thermal imaging cameras for smartphones with a usable 8mm macro lens. This special design allows users to capture detailed thermal images of objects even at close range, which is especially useful for identifying heat loss, the condition of insulation, electrical problems and details, or damage to circuit boards and their components. The outstanding feature of this camera is the focusable 8 mm macro lens that allows magnification of the subject.

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And who, pray tell, is Xinfrared? This is a consumer brand from InfiRay, a manufacturer that specializes in infrared camera technology. Its products include a variety of infrared cameras in the mobile space, including models designed specifically for smartphones. The cameras are used in a variety of industries, from building diagnostics to hardware inspection. So much for the theory.

Since the built-in bolometer of the Xinfrared T2S Plus is also much more capable than the small 80 x 60 bolometers of the usual smartphones with the cheap FLIR chips, my private curiosity was naturally aroused. Can this camera perhaps even replace my extremely expensive, but unfortunately also wired camera technology in certain situations? I’ve been looking for a complement for quite some time, so this all has a very practical background for me as well. I have therefore described today’s self-experiment in more detail and also calibrated the camera beforehand, because it can clearly do more than what you get served up as PR half-knowledge in the usual influencer videos or blogs.

That’s why I’ll come back to the app in a special chapter, because you can only measure relatively accurately with the right settings and not just estimate where the hot and cold spots are. And in general – in order to discourage the careless from using the app and at the same time motivate them to finally learn more about it – I have added a short technical explanation of the technology used. If this is still not enough, please refer to the basic article on the last page.

Scope of delivery and accessories

The camera and its accessories were delivered safely in a well-padded box. The Xtherm II T2S weighs 18 grams and measures 26 millimeters in width, 26 millimeters in height, and 24.2 millimeters in thickness. Included are a small, padded storage case, a Lightning or Type-C extension cable, and a quick start guide and stickers that no one needs. An accompanying software package, which you have to download yourself, provides the necessary tools to select the appropriate options and capture the resulting photos and videos.

Camera details about the T2S Plus and theoretical basics of a bolometer

Weighing 18 grams, the T2S Plus model features a 256 x 192 sensor array that produces the basic thermal image. This compact camera is equipped with a 12 μm infrared detector and an integrated, adjustable 8 mm macro lens. After all, the image displayed with this ends up reflecting the detail of the thermal detector. Infrared resolutions usually vary between 80 x 60 and 640 x 480 pixels. Higher resolution images contain more information, which increases measurement accuracy.

Cameras with a resolution of 80 x 60 pixels are sufficient when working close to the object to be inspected. However, better thermal resolution is required for measuring smaller targets from a greater distance. In this wavelength range, uncooled photoelectric detectors are basically not available. Since the radiation maximum in the mid-infrared is for substances with temperatures that occur naturally on Earth, bolometer arrays are being used to develop thermal cameras that can operate without cooling and can be calibrated, as was just done with the T2S Plus.

Infrared cameras are specialized devices capable of detecting thermal radiation and converting it into visual images. These cameras are essential in areas such as building diagnostics, industrial inspection and security. Two important parameters that determine the performance of an infrared camera are NETD (Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference) and MRTD (Minimum Resolvable Temperature Difference). While NETD indicates the smallest temperature difference that the camera can detect under ideal conditions, MRTD describes the minimum temperature difference that an object must have from its surroundings for it to still be distinguishable by the camera. Proper focusing is critical to obtaining clear and accurate thermal images. An out-of-focus image can lead to incorrect interpretations and measurements.

Another critical factor in infrared detectors, especially bolometers, is pixel size. The size of the pixels can affect the spatial resolution and sensitivity of the detector. Smaller pixels can image finer details, while larger pixels are generally more sensitive to temperature changes. Understanding these parameters and their significance is critical for optimal use and interpretation of infrared camera results. The T2S Plus is actually a pretty good compromise there with the 12 μm pixel size for each sensor in the bolometer matrix. The NETD is ≤60mK @ 25 °C, F#1.0 and the MRTD is ≤500 mK @ 25 °C, F#1.0, which is quite usable for such a small camera solution. Temperatures can also be captured on the T2S Plus at a single point, along the length of a line, or within a rectangle sized to cover a specific area.

Such bolometer arrays are used to detect infrared radiation, particularly mid-infrared (MIR) radiation, and to measure temperature changes caused by incident electromagnetic radiation, particularly infrared radiation. Such a detector works by raising the temperature of a temperature-sensitive resistive material, often a semiconductor or metal film, when struck by infrared radiation. This temperature increase causes a change in the electrical resistance of the material, which is then in turn measured and converted into an electrical signal.

© Optris GmbH

This signal is then further amplified and processed to produce a thermal image representing the temperature distribution of the observed area. Bolometers are characterized by their high sensitivity and can detect a wide range of infrared wavelengths. Another advantage of bolometers is that, unlike some other infrared detectors, they do not require active cooling, making them more compact and cost-effective. Their fast response time allows them to detect temperature changes in real time, making them useful for a variety of applications. However, there is one small but regarding the temperature sensitivity of the bolometer, but I’ll get to that in a moment.

Advantages and disadvantages of mobile solutions and built-in smartphone cameras

Infrared cameras in smartphones have become increasingly popular in recent years, as they offer a variety of practical applications. However, a lot of mischief is also done with them and people believe they are measuring something that doesn’t actually deserve the term measurement. Mostly, however, they are only rough estimates, because the small matrix with only a few measurement pixels, a lack of focus and the limited functions or settings in the software do not allow more. Believe instead of know, that’s unfortunately the case most of the time and always leads to nice errors and confusions.

Yes, mobile solutions also have advantages. The integration into a smartphone, for example, makes the infrared camera extremely portable and available at any time. It can be used for a variety of applications, from checking for heat leaks in a house to nighttime photography. For something like this, what’s offered is usually sufficient. By integrating it into a smartphone, users can use intuitive apps to analyze and share images. Mass production and integration into smartphones can reduce costs for individuals compared to standalone infrared cameras. However, there are also weighty reasons against such an integrated solution.

The quality of infrared images from smartphone cameras is nowhere near that of professional stand-alone infrared cameras. Some advanced features available in professional infrared cameras are almost always missing in such cheap smartphone versions. Using the infrared camera can also drain the smartphone’s battery faster, and integrating additional sensors into a smartphone can lead to compromises in other features or the device’s size. Also, here comes a very important point that I had already hinted at: smartphones can get hot during intensive use, which can then extremely affect the accuracy of the infrared camera as a result!

Mobile infrared cameras in smartphones offer a convenient and versatile way to see the world from a different perspective. While they offer many benefits, they are not necessarily a replacement for specialized equipment in professional applications. Unless you make them pluggable as an external solution like to T2S Plus, which is offered for USB-C and Lightning, Android, iOS and even Windows. Then you neither have the negative effect of the smartphone heating up nor the problems with space and a usable optics including manual focusing. If the app is also right and you can also extend the connection with external cables (e.g.) for a microscope stand, then something like this will also be interesting for me. Which closes the circle and I can come back to the camera as such. But one should have already talked about it once.

Technical data

Besides the manufacturer’s link, I have attached the excerpt from the datasheet and cut out the advertising. I get no money for it 😀

datasheet-t2s-t2l-thermal-camera-for-smartphone

 

Kommentar

Lade neue Kommentare

big-maec

Urgestein

895 Kommentare 530 Likes

Danke für den Test, das Model werde ich mir mal für später vormerken, bei Amazon ist die aber nur was für Ingenieure.:giggle:

https://www.amazon.de/Wärmebildkamera-Ingenieure-Xinfrared-PCB-Ausrichtungsmessgerät-Schaltkreise-Erkennen/dp/B0BJQ2HG9N

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,385 Kommentare 19,303 Likes

Das ist ja die Crux mit solchen Titeln auf Amazon. Aber sie ist auch unkalibriert gut zu verwenden und eben nicht nur was für Ingenieure, aber eben auch. Die Software bietet genügend Settings, um die Resultate dem eigenen Wissenstand anzupassen. Und das Teil ist immer noch besser als ein FLIR-Handheld für 500 Euro :D

Ja, zu meckern gibt es immer was, aber das ist hier schon recht hohes Niveau. Und der Black Friday kommt ja auch bald...

Antwort 4 Likes

echolot

Urgestein

1,059 Kommentare 810 Likes

Erst einmal ein Dankeschön für den Test. Diese Gerätschaften kommen ja auch immer mehr für den Ottonormaluser in Mode. Für was auch immer.
Das Problem ist schlicht das die wenigsten ein kalibriertes Referenzgerät zur Hand haben und eine Kalibrierung bzw. Nachjustierung sehr wahrscheinlich den Preis des Gerätes übertreffen wird. Wer mit +/- 2°C Abweichung leben kann soll damit glücklich werden. Wäre mir persönlich zu viel, wobei das ja auch von der Anwendung abhängt.

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,385 Kommentare 19,303 Likes

Lesen, es sind Prozent. Bei 50 Grad wäre es noch +/- 1 Grad. 😂

Antwort 1 Like

Selaya

Mitglied

23 Kommentare 9 Likes

256x192? hui
fast 50,000 pixels, ist ja schon eine hausnummer

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,385 Kommentare 19,303 Likes

Die FLIR-Dinger haben nur 80x60 :D

Außerdem laufen die Videos mit 25 FPS. FLIR schafft ganze 9 FPS (US Waffenembargo, was für ein Käse)

Antwort 4 Likes

J
John hill

Neuling

2 Kommentare 0 Likes

Sehr interessante Kommentare. Ich denke, es ist ein großartiges Werkzeug für Wärmebild-Enthusiasten und professionelle Ingenieure gleichermaßen, und das Preis-Leistungs-Verhältnis ist wirklich gut (im Vergleich zu einigen der traditionellen Bosse der Branche😆).
Wissen Sie übrigens, wie viel Xinfrared dieses Produkt auf der BF-Veranstaltung anbietet?

Antwort Gefällt mir

echolot

Urgestein

1,059 Kommentare 810 Likes

Ja sorry. Habs falsch hingeschrieben.

Antwort Gefällt mir

big-maec

Urgestein

895 Kommentare 530 Likes

Mmmh kommt darauf an, es wird ja auch beworben für die Jagd. So ein Teil an der Drohne.

View image at the forums

Antwort Gefällt mir

Igor Wallossek

1

10,385 Kommentare 19,303 Likes

Die US-Produkte haben nur 9 FPS. :D

Ich hatte damals meine Pi450 an TH US geschickt, aber die waren zu doof, das zu benutzen. Rücksendung nach DE ging nicht, wegen des US-Waffenembargos. Das ging dann nur als deklariertes elektronisches "Ersatzteil" ;)

Antwort 1 Like

ryanmi

Neuling

1 Kommentare 0 Likes

Als Heizungs-, Lüftungs- und Klimatechnik ist die Wärmebildkamera ein Werkzeug, das Sie nicht oft verwenden, aber wenn Sie es brauchen und es haben, werden Sie dankbar sein. Die Kosten sind deutlich gesunken und sogar die, die Sie mit Ihrem Telefon verwenden, funktionieren wirklich gut. T2S+ ist eine tolle Option.

Antwort Gefällt mir

T
Theresa W Chavez

Neuling

1 Kommentare 0 Likes
Great Thermal Camera from Infiray.

I have the Flir one and I can say that for macros and dynamic range of T2S surpasses my Flir one.

Antwort Gefällt mir

G
Guest

Wenn Du die Kamera am Handy fix auf der B&T MP9 montiert hast, hast nettes warmes Bild von
0,5 bis 20 Meter. Ausreichend für "allesindienackbrar"...
Wenns größer wird, wirds schwerer, das Loipold auf der 223er oder Scar dann mit 2 Kilo.
dafür auf 300 Meter nett .) Peace :)

Antwort Gefällt mir

e
eastcoast_pete

Urgestein

1,635 Kommentare 953 Likes

@Danke, sehr interessant! Zwei Fragen an Dich und die anderen hier im Forum; eine davon ist wahrscheinlich etwas naiv:
1. Gerade mit KI jetzt überall, gibt es denn eine Webseite oder App, die einem von einem Bild des Gegenstandes das wahrscheinliche Material sowie die Eckdaten (Strahler) vorschlagen kann, damit die Kalibrierung klappt?
2. Hier die eventuell naive Frage: wie empfindlich ist die Kamera gegen intensives sichtbares Licht? Ist die Optik entsprechend beschichtet?
Beispiel wäre, man will eine Wandtemperatur messen an einem richtig sonnigen Tag.

Antwort 1 Like

Igor Wallossek

1

10,385 Kommentare 19,303 Likes

Zum Thema Mirroring habe ich was geschrieben und Du siehst auf der ersten Seite, dass Bolometer nur Strahlungen unterhalb des sichtbaren Lichts in einem eng definierten Band aufzeichnen. Aber: Auch Sonne hat infrarote Anteile, die man aber geschickt abschatten kann. Die Optik ist zwar vergütet, aber gegen direkte Strahlung hilft sowas bei keiner Kamera. :)

Antwort 2 Likes

L
Lisa J Thibodeaux

Neuling

1 Kommentare 0 Likes

Als Heizungs-, Lüftungs- und Klimatechnik ist die Wärmebildkamera ein Werkzeug, das Sie nicht oft verwenden, aber wenn Sie es brauchen und es haben, werden Sie dankbar sein. Die Kosten sind deutlich gesunken und sogar die, die Sie mit Ihrem Telefon verwenden, funktionieren wirklich gut. T2S+ ist eine tolle Option.

Antwort Gefällt mir

*
*T*A*N*K*

Neuling

5 Kommentare 2 Likes

Endlich mal eine gescheite Alternative zu den SeekThermal-Modellen!
Ich habe Jahrelang in der Produktion aktiver Thermografiesysteme gearbeitet und da haben wir natürlich die Möglichkeit der Überprüfung der 'billigen' Modelle genutzt. FLIR ist bei diesen mobilen Lösungen recht praktisch, aber auch sehr ungenau. Die Modelle von Seek Thermal waren damals schon genauer und zugleich preiswerter. Nachteil: sie haben auch die Einschränkung auf 9Hz (inzwischen auch mit 15 Hz verfügbar). Aber einen preiswerteren Einstieg in die Thermografie wird man nicht finden, zumindest nicht wenn das Gemessene nicht nur *bunt* sondern auch einigermaßen genau sein soll.

Antwort 2 Likes

J
John hill

Neuling

2 Kommentare 0 Likes

yes it means that technology is developing very fast and the benificial is us😂

Antwort Gefällt mir

T
Timothy S McGraw

Neuling

1 Kommentare 0 Likes

Got my T2S+ last week - and my initial tests seem to confirm my expectations: Great camera (for the price)! Crappy Android app The included pistol grip is nicely made - but it seems unnecessary and bulky and I would rather have saved the odd 20 EUR. You can just hold the small camera in the end of the included cable instead. Now, if only the app allowed manual rotation of the image...

Antwort Gefällt mir

Danke für die Spende



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About the author

Igor Wallossek

Editor-in-chief and name-giver of igor'sLAB as the content successor of Tom's Hardware Germany, whose license was returned in June 2019 in order to better meet the qualitative demands of web content and challenges of new media such as YouTube with its own channel.

Computer nerd since 1983, audio freak since 1979 and pretty much open to anything with a plug or battery for over 50 years.

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